Nature.com

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Papers with shorter titles get more citations

    NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
    Boer Deng
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Intriguing correlation mined from 140,000 papers.Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2015.18246
  • Neurodegeneration: Problems at the nuclear pore

    Nature - AOP - nature.com science feeds
    Bennett W. Fox
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 26 August 2015. doi:10.1038/nature15208 Authors: Bennett W. Fox & Randal S. Tibbetts Expansion of a repetitive DNA sequence is associated with neurodegeneration. Three studies identify genes involved in nuclear import and export that can mediate the toxicity this expansion causes.
  • Graphene: High-quality delamination

    Nature Materials - Issue - nature.com science feeds
    John Plummer
    19 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Materials 14, 857 (2015). doi:10.1038/nmat4416 Author: John Plummer
  • The C9orf72 repeat expansion disrupts nucleocytoplasmic transport

    Nature - AOP - nature.com science feeds
    Ke Zhang
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 26 August 2015. doi:10.1038/nature14973 Authors: Ke Zhang, Christopher J. Donnelly, Aaron R. Haeusler, Jonathan C. Grima, James B. Machamer, Peter Steinwald, Elizabeth L. Daley, Sean J. Miller, Kathleen M. Cunningham, Svetlana Vidensky, Saksham Gupta, Michael A. Thomas, Ingie Hong, Shu-Ling Chiu, Richard L. Huganir, Lyle W. Ostrow, Michael J. Matunis, Jiou Wang, Rita Sattler, Thomas E. Lloyd & Jeffrey D. Rothstein
  • How cities can beat the heat

    NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
    Hannah Hoag
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Rising temperatures are threatening urban areas, but efforts to cool them may not work as planned.Nature 524 402 doi: 10.1038/524402a
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Know your network

    Peter Fiske
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Know your network Nature 524, 7566 (2015). doi:10.1038/nj7566-507a Author: Peter Fiske Seek and cultivate professional relationships to advance your career, says Peter Fiske.
  • Human evolution: Old finger with modern traits

    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Human evolution: Old finger with modern traits Nature 524, 7566 (2015). doi:10.1038/524391a A 1.84-million-year-old finger bone from Tanzania is the oldest known hominin hand bone with human-like features.Ancient human relatives used stone tools 2 million to 3 million years ago, but had hands that were suited to living in trees. A team led by Manuel Domínguez-Rodrigo
  • Astrophysics: Cosmic neutrinos abound

    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Astrophysics: Cosmic neutrinos abound Nature 524, 7566 (2015). doi:10.1038/524391e Super-high-energy neutrinos from outside the Milky Way pepper Earth from all directions.Neutrinos are created in the Universe's most violent environments and travel through it almost unimpeded, providing a way to study distant astronomical objects. A team at the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South
  • We must build resilience into our communities

    Erwann Michel-Kerjan
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    We must build resilience into our communities Nature 524, 7566 (2015). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/524389a Author: Erwann Michel-Kerjan Innovative approaches can better equip society to deal with natural disasters and other shocks, says Erwann Michel-Kerjan.
  • Medical microbiology: Lung pathogen evolves in isolation

    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Medical microbiology: Lung pathogen evolves in isolation Nature 524, 7566 (2015). doi:10.1038/524391c Bacteria that infect the lungs of people with cystic fibrosis evolve into different forms in various parts of the lungs.Pradeep Singh at the University of Washington in Seattle and his team dissected the infected lungs of ten people with the disease who were having
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • The C9orf72 repeat expansion disrupts nucleocytoplasmic transport

    Ke Zhang
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 26 August 2015. doi:10.1038/nature14973 Authors: Ke Zhang, Christopher J. Donnelly, Aaron R. Haeusler, Jonathan C. Grima, James B. Machamer, Peter Steinwald, Elizabeth L. Daley, Sean J. Miller, Kathleen M. Cunningham, Svetlana Vidensky, Saksham Gupta, Michael A. Thomas, Ingie Hong, Shu-Ling Chiu, Richard L. Huganir, Lyle W. Ostrow, Michael J. Matunis, Jiou Wang, Rita Sattler, Thomas E. Lloyd & Jeffrey D. Rothstein
  • Neurodegeneration: Problems at the nuclear pore

    Bennett W. Fox
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 26 August 2015. doi:10.1038/nature15208 Authors: Bennett W. Fox & Randal S. Tibbetts Expansion of a repetitive DNA sequence is associated with neurodegeneration. Three studies identify genes involved in nuclear import and export that can mediate the toxicity this expansion causes.
  • GGGGCC repeat expansion in C9orf72 compromises nucleocytoplasmic transport

    Brian D. Freibaum
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 26 August 2015. doi:10.1038/nature14974 Authors: Brian D. Freibaum, Yubing Lu, Rodrigo Lopez-Gonzalez, Nam Chul Kim, Sandra Almeida, Kyung-Ha Lee, Nisha Badders, Marc Valentine, Bruce L. Miller, Philip C. Wong, Leonard Petrucelli, Hong Joo Kim, Fen-Biao Gao & J. Paul Taylor The GGGGCC (G4C2) repeat expansion in a noncoding region of C9orf72 is the most common cause of sporadic and familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. The basis for pathogenesis is unknown. To elucidate the consequences of G4C2 repeat expansion in a…
  • Cancer: A moving target

    Natalia L. Komarova
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 26 August 2015. doi:10.1038/nature15210 Author: Natalia L. Komarova An in silico, three-dimensional model of tumour evolution suggests that cell motility is a key factor in the initial growth of a tumour mass. The model also reveals the dynamics of mutation spread.
  • Orientation-specific joining of AID-initiated DNA breaks promotes antibody class switching

    Junchao Dong
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 26 August 2015. doi:10.1038/nature14970 Authors: Junchao Dong, Rohit A. Panchakshari, Tingting Zhang, Yu Zhang, Jiazhi Hu, Sabrina A. Volpi, Robin M. Meyers, Yu-Jui Ho, Zhou Du, Davide F. Robbiani, Feilong Meng, Monica Gostissa, Michel C. Nussenzweig, John P. Manis & Frederick W. Alt During B-cell development, RAG endonuclease cleaves immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) V, D, and J gene segments and orchestrates their fusion as deletional events that assemble a V(D)J exon in the same transcriptional orientation as adjacent Cμ constant region exons. In…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Biotechnology - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • High-throughput phosphoproteomics reveals in vivo insulin signaling dynamics

    Sean J Humphrey
    16 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3327 Authors: Sean J Humphrey, S Babak Azimifar & Matthias Mann Mass spectrometry has enabled the study of cellular signaling on a systems-wide scale, through the quantification of post-translational modifications, such as protein phosphorylation. Here we describe EasyPhos, a scalable phosphoproteomics platform that now allows rapid quantification of hundreds of phosphoproteomes in diverse cells and tissues at a depth of >10,000 sites. We apply this technology to generate time-resolved maps of insulin signaling in the mouse liver. Our results…
  • Overexpression of receptor-like kinase ERECTA improves thermotolerance in rice and tomato

    Hui Shen
    16 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3321 Authors: Hui Shen, Xiangbin Zhong, Fangfang Zhao, Yanmei Wang, Bingxiao Yan, Qun Li, Genyun Chen, Bizeng Mao, Jianjun Wang, Yangsheng Li, Guoying Xiao, Yuke He, Han Xiao, Jianming Li & Zuhua He The detrimental effects of global warming on crop productivity threaten to reduce the world's food supply. Although plant responses to changes in temperature have been studied, genetic modification of crops to improve thermotolerance has had little success to date. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of the Arabidopsis thaliana receptor-like kinase…
  • Massively parallel high-order combinatorial genetics in human cells

    Alan S L Wong
    16 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3326 Authors: Alan S L Wong, Gigi C G Choi, Allen A Cheng, Oliver Purcell & Timothy K Lu
  • Prediction of human population responses to toxic compounds by a collaborative competition

    Federica Eduati
    9 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3299 Authors: Federica Eduati, Lara M Mangravite, Tao Wang, Hao Tang, J Christopher Bare, Ruili Huang, Thea Norman, Mike Kellen, Michael P Menden, Jichen Yang, Xiaowei Zhan, Rui Zhong, Guanghua Xiao, Menghang Xia, Nour Abdo, Oksana Kosyk, Federica Eduati, Lara M Mangravite, J Christopher Bare, Thea Norman, Mike Kellen, Michael P Menden, Stephen Friend, Gustavo Stolovitzky, Allen Dearry, Raymond R Tice, Ruili Huang, Menghang Xia, Anton Simeonov, Nour Abdo, Oksana Kosyk, Ivan Rusyn, Fred A Wright, Tao Wang, Hao Tang, Xiaowei Zhan, Jichen Yang, Rui Zhong,…
  • Differentiation of pluripotent stem cells to muscle fiber to model Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Jérome Chal
    2 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3297 Authors: Jérome Chal, Masayuki Oginuma, Ziad Al Tanoury, Bénédicte Gobert, Olga Sumara, Aurore Hick, Fanny Bousson, Yasmine Zidouni, Caroline Mursch, Philippe Moncuquet, Olivier Tassy, Stéphane Vincent, Ayako Miyanari, Agata Bera, Jean-Marie Garnier, Getzabel Guevara, Marie Hestin, Leif Kennedy, Shinichiro Hayashi, Bernadette Drayton, Thomas Cherrier, Barbara Gayraud-Morel, Emanuela Gussoni, Frédéric Relaix, Shahragim Tajbakhsh & Olivier Pourquié
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Cell Biology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Fumarate in DNA repair

    Susan P. Lees-Miller
    27 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Cell Biology 17, 1096 (2015). doi:10.1038/ncb3232 Author: Susan P. Lees-Miller A new study suggests that fumarase, a metabolic enzyme normally associated with ATP production in mitochondria, is recruited to sites of DNA damage where it produces fumarate to inhibit histone demethylation and promote repair of DNA double strand breaks.
  • Microtubule nucleation at the centrosome and beyond

    Sabine Petry
    27 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Cell Biology 17, 1089 (2015). doi:10.1038/ncb3220 Authors: Sabine Petry & Ronald D. Vale Microtubule polymerization is initiated by γ-tubulin containing complexes. Petry and Vale discuss factors involved in localizing and activating γ-tubulin at different locations in the cell.
  • Actin shapes the autophagosome

    Petter Holland
    27 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Cell Biology 17, 1094 (2015). doi:10.1038/ncb3224 Authors: Petter Holland & Anne Simonsen Compared with most intracellular vesicles, the autophagosome is formed by an unusual event of vesicle budding involving an elusive sequence of membrane expansions that ends with a double membrane vesicle. It is now shown that actin polymerization inside the forming autophagosome is a driving force for the expansion and assembly of a functional autophagosome.
  • Corrigendum: The oncogene c-Jun impedes somatic cell reprogramming

    Jing Liu
    27 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Cell Biology 17, 1228 (2015). doi:10.1038/ncb3235 Author: Jing Liu, Qingkai Han, Tianran Peng, Meixiu Peng, Bei Wei, Dongwei Li, Xiaoshan Wang, Shengyong Yu, Jiaqi Yang, Shangtao Cao, Kaimeng Huang, Andrew Paul Hutchins, He Liu, Junqi Kuang, Zhiwei Zhou, Jing Chen, Haoyu Wu, Lin Guo, Yongqiang Chen, You Chen, Xuejia Li, Hongling Wu, Baojian Liao, Wei He, Hong Song, Hongjie Yao, Guangjin Pan, Jiekai Chen & Duanqing Pei
  • Distinct E-cadherin-based complexes regulate cell behaviour through miRNA processing or Src and p120 catenin activity

    Antonis Kourtidis
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Cell Biology 17, 1145 (2015). doi:10.1038/ncb3227 Authors: Antonis Kourtidis, Siu P. Ngok, Pamela Pulimeno, Ryan W. Feathers, Lomeli R. Carpio, Tiffany R. Baker, Jennifer M. Carr, Irene K. Yan, Sahra Borges, Edith A. Perez, Peter Storz, John A. Copland, Tushar Patel, E. Aubrey Thompson, Sandra Citi & Panos Z. Anastasiadis
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Chemical Biology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Translating biosynthetic gene clusters into fungal armor and weaponry

    Nancy P Keller
    17 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 11, 671 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1897 Author: Nancy P Keller
  • A chemocentric view of the natural product inventory

    Christopher T Walsh
    17 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 11, 620 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1894 Author: Christopher T Walsh As the identification of previously undetected microbial biosynthetic pathways burgeons, there arises the question of how much new chemistry is yet to be found. This, in turn, devolves to: what kinds of biosynthetic enzymatic transformations are yet to be characterized?
  • Methods: A small-molecule SMASh hit

    Jeffrey Hannah
    17 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 11, 637 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1886 Authors: Jeffrey Hannah & Pengbo Zhou There are many techniques that can be employed to control gene expression at the post-translational level. However, a novel system called SMASh (small molecule–assisted shutoff), which allows for chemically-induced degradation of target proteins, presents some distinct advantages.
  • Minimum Information about a Biosynthetic Gene cluster

    Marnix H Medema
    17 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 11, 625 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1890 Authors: Marnix H Medema, Renzo Kottmann, Pelin Yilmaz, Matthew Cummings, John B Biggins, Kai Blin, Irene de Bruijn, Yit Heng Chooi, Jan Claesen, R Cameron Coates, Pablo Cruz-Morales, Srikanth Duddela, Stephanie Düsterhus, Daniel J Edwards, David P Fewer, Neha Garg, Christoph Geiger, Juan Pablo Gomez-Escribano, Anja Greule, Michalis Hadjithomas, Anthony S Haines, Eric J N Helfrich, Matthew L Hillwig, Keishi Ishida, Adam C Jones, Carla S Jones, Katrin Jungmann, Carsten Kegler, Hyun Uk Kim, Peter Kötter, Daniel Krug,…
  • Protein degradation: Prime time for PROTACs

    Raymond J Deshaies
    17 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 11, 634 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1887 Author: Raymond J Deshaies PROTACs are heterobifunctional small molecules that simultaneously bind a target protein and a ubiquitin ligase, enabling ubiquitination and degradation of the target. Major progress in developing potent and specific PROTACs has recently been reported, invigorating prospects for novel PROTAC-based therapies.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Chemistry

  • Synthetic biology: Caught in a TRAP

    Russell Johnson
    19 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry 7, 681 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchem.2340 Author: Russell Johnson
  • Nickel catalysis: Amide activation

    Stephen Davey
    19 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry 7, 682 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchem.2341 Author: Stephen Davey
  • Hydrogels: Coordination driven gelation

    Thomas Faust
    19 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry 7, 681 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchem.2339 Author: Thomas Faust
  • Blogroll: Better online science

    Matthew Partridge
    19 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry 7, 682 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchem.2333 Author: Matthew Partridge
  • State-specific electron transfer: Shake it off

    Igor V. Rubtsov
    19 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry 7, 683 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchem.2332 Author: Igor V. Rubtsov Electron transfer is ubiquitous across both life and modern technologies, and thus being able to control it is an attractive goal. Now, targeted infrared excitation has been used to modulate the efficiency of electron transfer in a series of donor–bridge–acceptor molecules.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Chemistry

  • Formal SiH4 chemistry using stable and easy-to-handle surrogates

    Antoine Simonneau
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2329 Authors: Antoine Simonneau & Martin Oestreich Cyclohexa-2,5-dien-1-yl groups bound to silicon act as masked Si–H bonds that can be released by the action of tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane (B(C6F5)3). In this way, hazardous SiH4 is unleashed from appropriately substituted precursors and engages in alkene hydrosilylation promoted by the same boron catalyst. The overall process is a transfer hydrosilylation of alkenes with monosilane.
  • Diverse sp3 C−H functionalization through alcohol β-sulfonyloxylation

    Yan Xu
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2326 Authors: Yan Xu, Guobing Yan, Zhi Ren & Guangbin Dong The late-stage functionalization of unactivated C(sp3)−H bonds could be useful for the rapid development of structure–activity relationships, but highly target-specific conditions make it challenging. Now, a strategy for the preparation of a variety of β-functionalized alcohol derivatives through a site-selective C−H sulfonyloxylation and subsequent SN2 reactions is described.
  • A cascade reaction network mimicking the basic functional steps of adaptive immune response

    Da Han
    16 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2325 Authors: Da Han, Cuichen Wu, Mingxu You, Tao Zhang, Shuo Wan, Tao Chen, Liping Qiu, Zheng Zheng, Hao Liang & Weihong Tan A cascade reaction network has been created that can function in a manner that is superficially similar to the most basic steps of the vertebrate adaptive immune response. This reaction network uses DNA and enzymes as simple artificial analogues of the components of the acquired immune system.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Genetics - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Genetic differential calculus

    Richard Mott
    26 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 47, 965 (2015). doi:10.1038/ng.3384 Author: Richard Mott High-throughput analysis of the phenotypes of mouse genetic knockouts presents several challenges, such as systematic measurement biases that can vary with time. A report from the EUMODIC consortium presents data from 320 genetic knockouts generated using standardized phenotyping pipelines and new statistical analyses aimed at increasing reproducibility across centers.
  • Corrigendum: Transcriptional activation of retrotransposons alters the expression of adjacent genes in wheat

    Khalil Kashkush
    26 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 47, 1099 (2015). doi:10.1038/ng0915-1099b Author: Khalil Kashkush, Moshe Feldman & Avraham A. Levy
  • Linking germline and somatic variation in Ewing sarcoma

    Nicholas C Gomez
    26 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 47, 964 (2015). doi:10.1038/ng.3387 Authors: Nicholas C Gomez & Ian J Davis The identification of gene-regulatory polymorphisms that influence cancer susceptibility can identify key oncogenic pathways. A new study links a germline variant to Ewing sarcoma disease susceptibility and EWSR1-FLI1–mediated gene activation.
  • Building a staircase to precision medicine for biliary tract cancer

    Nataliya Razumilava
    26 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 47, 967 (2015). doi:10.1038/ng.3386 Authors: Nataliya Razumilava & Gregory J Gores A new study has conducted a comprehensive exome and transcriptome analysis of a large number of intrahepatic, perihilar and distal cholangiocarcinomas and gallbladder cancers in Japanese patients. This study identifies many new alterations, confirms genetic differences in these distinct subtypes of biliary tract cancer and demonstrates that approximately 40% of described genetic aberrations are potentially targetable.
  • Corrigendum: Exploring population size changes using SNP frequency spectra

    Xiaoming Liu
    26 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 47, 1099 (2015). doi:10.1038/ng0915-1099a Author: Xiaoming Liu & Yun-Xin Fu
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Geoscience - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Snowball cooling after algal rise

    Georg Feulner
    26 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience 8, 659 (2015). doi:10.1038/ngeo2523 Authors: Georg Feulner, Christian Hallmann & Hendrik Kienert The Earth underwent two snowball glaciation events between 720 and 635 million years ago. The preceding expansion of eukaryotic algae and a consequent rise in emissions of organic cloud condensation nuclei may have contributed to the dramatic cooling.
  • Pluto: Glaciology's new horizon

    Tamara Goldin
    26 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience 8, 666 (2015). doi:10.1038/ngeo2528 Author: Tamara Goldin
  • Disintegration of Apollo lunar soil

    B. L. Cooper
    26 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience 8, 657 (2015). doi:10.1038/ngeo2527 Authors: B. L. Cooper, K. Thaisen, B. C. Chang, T. S. Lee & D. S. McKay
  • An icy past

    26 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience 8, 655 (2015). doi:10.1038/ngeo2531 During several intervals in Earth's history, ice sheets expanded to cover the globe. These glaciations may be intricately linked to the evolution of life.
  • Constraints from material properties on the dynamics and evolution of Earth’s core

    Christopher Davies
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience 8, 678 (2015). doi:10.1038/ngeo2492 Authors: Christopher Davies, Monica Pozzo, David Gubbins & Dario Alfè
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Geoscience - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • Planetary science: Carbon in the Moon

    Bruno Scaillet
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2530 Author: Bruno Scaillet The Moon was once thought to be depleted in volatile elements. Analyses of the carbon contents of lunar volcanic glasses reveal that carbon monoxide degassing could have produced the fire-fountain eruptions from which these glasses were formed.
  • Carbon content and degassing history of the lunar volcanic glasses

    Diane T. Wetzel
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2511 Authors: Diane T. Wetzel, Erik H. Hauri, Alberto E. Saal & Malcolm J. Rutherford Volcanic glasses observed on the lunar surface have been interpreted as the products of volatile-rich, fire-fountain eruptions. Revised estimates of the water content of primitive lunar magmas have overturned the notion of a volatile-poor Moon, but degassing of water-rich vapour during volcanic eruptions is inconsistent with geochemical and petrological observations. Although degassing of carbon is compatible with observations, the amount of indigenous carbon in lunar…
  • A record of spontaneous subduction initiation in the Izu–Bonin–Mariana arc

    Richard J. Arculus
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2515 Authors: Richard J. Arculus, Osamu Ishizuka, Kara A. Bogus, Michael Gurnis, Rosemary Hickey-Vargas, Mohammed H. Aljahdali, Alexandre N. Bandini-Maeder, Andrew P. Barth, Philipp A. Brandl, Laureen Drab, Rodrigo do Monte Guerra, Morihisa Hamada, Fuqing Jiang, Kyoko Kanayama, Sev Kender, Yuki Kusano, He Li, Lorne C. Loudin, Marco Maffione, Kathleen M. Marsaglia, Anders McCarthy, Sebastién Meffre, Antony Morris, Martin Neuhaus, Ivan P. Savov, Clara Sena, Frank J. Tepley III, Cees van der Land, Gene M. Yogodzinski & Zhaohui Zhang
  • Orbitally forced ice sheet fluctuations during the Marinoan Snowball Earth glaciation

    Douglas I. Benn
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2502 Authors: Douglas I. Benn, Guillaume Le Hir, Huiming Bao, Yannick Donnadieu, Christophe Dumas, Edward J. Fleming, Michael J. Hambrey, Emily A. McMillan, Michael S. Petronis, Gilles Ramstein, Carl T. E. Stevenson, Peter M. Wynn & Ian J. Fairchild Two global glaciations occurred during the Neoproterozoic. Snowball Earth theory posits that these were terminated after millions of years of frigidity when initial warming from rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations was amplified by the reduction of ice cover and hence a reduction in planetary albedo. This…
  • Palaeoclimate: Snowball climate conundrum

    Philip Allen
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2504 Author: Philip Allen Evidence for a Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth in the sedimentary record has been controversial. A weathered horizon preserved in sedimentary rocks from Svalbard may provide a rare signature of prolonged global glaciation.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Materials - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Graphene: High-quality delamination

    John Plummer
    19 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Materials 14, 857 (2015). doi:10.1038/nmat4416 Author: John Plummer
  • The British route to innovation

    19 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Materials 14, 851 (2015). doi:10.1038/nmat4404 Richard Murray of Innovate UK explains to Nature Materials how innovation derived from research findings can boost the production of wealth.
  • Microscopy: Around the single atom

    Maria Maragkou
    19 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Materials 14, 857 (2015). doi:10.1038/nmat4414 Author: Maria Maragkou
  • Reworking Greek research

    19 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Materials 14, 853 (2015). doi:10.1038/nmat4403 Costas Fotakis, the Greek Alternate Minister for Research and Innovation, explains to Nature Materials how he plans to improve the country's research and innovation landscape under the constraints of austerity.
  • 2D materials: Ultrafast exciton dynamics

    Xavier Marie
    19 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Materials 14, 860 (2015). doi:10.1038/nmat4398 Authors: Xavier Marie & Bernhard Urbaszek Time-resolved measurements of the exciton dynamics in tungsten diselenide monolayers reveal ultrafast radiative recombination of the exciton ground state (∼150 fs) and the interplay between optically bright and dark excitons.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Medicine - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • Hemagglutinin-stem nanoparticles generate heterosubtypic influenza protection

    Hadi M Yassine
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Medicine. doi:10.1038/nm.3927 Authors: Hadi M Yassine, Jeffrey C Boyington, Patrick M McTamney, Chih-Jen Wei, Masaru Kanekiyo, Wing-Pui Kong, John R Gallagher, Lingshu Wang, Yi Zhang, M Gordon Joyce, Daniel Lingwood, Syed M Moin, Hanne Andersen, Yoshinobu Okuno, Srinivas S Rao, Audray K Harris, Peter D Kwong, John R Mascola, Gary J Nabel & Barney S Graham The antibody response to influenza is primarily focused on the head region of the hemagglutinin (HA) glycoprotein, which in turn undergoes antigenic drift, thus necessitating annual updates of influenza vaccines. In contrast, the…
  • RAS-MAPK dependence underlies a rational polytherapy strategy in EML4-ALK–positive lung cancer

    Gorjan Hrustanovic
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Medicine. doi:10.1038/nm.3930 Authors: Gorjan Hrustanovic, Victor Olivas, Evangelos Pazarentzos, Asmin Tulpule, Saurabh Asthana, Collin M Blakely, Ross A Okimoto, Luping Lin, Dana S Neel, Amit Sabnis, Jennifer Flanagan, Elton Chan, Marileila Varella-Garcia, Dara L Aisner, Aria Vaishnavi, Sai-Hong I Ou, Eric A Collisson, Eiki Ichihara, Philip C Mack, Christine M Lovly, Niki Karachaliou, Rafael Rosell, Jonathan W Riess, Robert C Doebele & Trever G Bivona
  • Meta-analysis of shared genetic architecture across ten pediatric autoimmune diseases

    Yun R Li
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Medicine. doi:10.1038/nm.3933 Authors: Yun R Li, Jin Li, Sihai D Zhao, Jonathan P Bradfield, Frank D Mentch, S Melkorka Maggadottir, Cuiping Hou, Debra J Abrams, Diana Chang, Feng Gao, Yiran Guo, Zhi Wei, John J Connolly, Christopher J Cardinale, Marina Bakay, Joseph T Glessner, Dong Li, Charlly Kao, Kelly A Thomas, Haijun Qiu, Rosetta M Chiavacci, Cecilia E Kim, Fengxiang Wang, James Snyder, Marylyn D Richie, Berit Flatø, Øystein Førre, Lee A Denson, Susan D Thompson, Mara L Becker, Stephen L Guthery, Anna Latiano, Elena Perez, Elena Resnick, Richard K Russell, David C…
  • Nogo-B regulates endothelial sphingolipid homeostasis to control vascular function and blood pressure

    Anna Cantalupo
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Medicine. doi:10.1038/nm.3934 Authors: Anna Cantalupo, Yi Zhang, Milankumar Kothiya, Sylvain Galvani, Hideru Obinata, Mariarosaria Bucci, Frank J Giordano, Xian-Cheng Jiang, Timothy Hla & Annarita Di Lorenzo
  • Glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor–related protein co-stimulation facilitates tumor regression by inducing IL-9–producing helper T cells

    Il-Kyu Kim
    16 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Medicine. doi:10.1038/nm.3922 Authors: Il-Kyu Kim, Byung-Seok Kim, Choong-Hyun Koh, Jae-Won Seok, Jun-Seok Park, Kwang-Soo Shin, Eun-Ah Bae, Ga-Eun Lee, Hyewon Jeon, Jaebeom Cho, Yujin Jung, Daehee Han, Byoung S Kwon, Ho-Young Lee, Yeonseok Chung & Chang-Yuil Kang
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Methods - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • Predicting effects of noncoding variants with deep learning–based sequence model

    Jian Zhou
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3547 Authors: Jian Zhou & Olga G Troyanskaya Identifying functional effects of noncoding variants is a major challenge in human genetics. To predict the noncoding-variant effects de novo from sequence, we developed a deep learning–based algorithmic framework, DeepSEA (http://deepsea.princeton.edu/), that directly learns a regulatory sequence code from large-scale chromatin-profiling data, enabling prediction of chromatin effects of sequence alterations with single-nucleotide sensitivity. We further used this capability to improve prioritization of…
  • Trajectories of cell-cycle progression from fixed cell populations

    Gabriele Gut
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3545 Authors: Gabriele Gut, Michelle D Tadmor, Dana Pe'er, Lucas Pelkmans & Prisca Liberali An accurate dissection of sources of cell-to-cell variability is crucial for quantitative biology at the single-cell level but has been challenging for the cell cycle. We present Cycler, a robust method that constructs a continuous trajectory of cell-cycle progression from images of fixed cells. Cycler handles heterogeneous microenvironments and does not require perturbations or genetic markers, making it generally applicable to quantifying multiple sources of…
  • Oscope identifies oscillatory genes in unsynchronized single-cell RNA-seq experiments

    Ning Leng
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3549 Authors: Ning Leng, Li-Fang Chu, Chris Barry, Yuan Li, Jeea Choi, Xiaomao Li, Peng Jiang, Ron M Stewart, James A Thomson & Christina Kendziorski Oscillatory gene expression is fundamental to development, but technologies for monitoring expression oscillations are limited. We have developed a statistical approach called Oscope to identify and characterize the transcriptional dynamics of oscillating genes in single-cell RNA-seq data from an unsynchronized cell population. Applying Oscope to a number of data sets, we demonstrated its utility and also…
  • EMRinger: side chain–directed model and map validation for 3D cryo-electron microscopy

    Benjamin A Barad
    16 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3541 Authors: Benjamin A Barad, Nathaniel Echols, Ray Yu-Ruei Wang, Yifan Cheng, Frank DiMaio, Paul D Adams & James S Fraser Advances in high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) require the development of validation metrics to independently assess map quality and model geometry. We report EMRinger, a tool that assesses the precise fitting of an atomic model into the map during refinement and shows how radiation damage alters scattering from negatively charged amino acids. EMRinger (https://github.com/fraser-lab/EMRinger) will be useful for…
  • ChIPmentation: fast, robust, low-input ChIP-seq for histones and transcription factors

    Christian Schmidl
    16 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3542 Authors: Christian Schmidl, André F Rendeiro, Nathan C Sheffield & Christoph Bock Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) is widely used to map histone marks and transcription factor binding throughout the genome. Here we present ChIPmentation, a method that combines chromatin immunoprecipitation with sequencing library preparation by Tn5 transposase ('tagmentation'). ChIPmentation introduces sequencing-compatible adaptors in a single-step reaction directly on bead-bound chromatin, which reduces time, cost and input…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Nanotechnology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Our choice from the recent literature

    4 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 10, 653 (2015). doi:10.1038/nnano.2015.181
  • Nanoengineering: Super symmetry in cell division

    Kerwyn Casey Huang
    4 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 10, 655 (2015). doi:10.1038/nnano.2015.148 Author: Kerwyn Casey Huang Bacterial cells can be sculpted into different shapes using nanofabricated chambers and then used to explore the spatial adaptation of protein oscillations that play an important role in cell division.
  • Biological machines: Molecular motor teamwork

    Edward P. Debold
    4 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 10, 656 (2015). doi:10.1038/nnano.2015.175 Author: Edward P. Debold Synthetic muscles built from DNA nanotube scaffolds can be used to study how myosin motors work together to make real muscles function.
  • Self-assembly gets physical

    Arthur J. Olson
    4 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 10, 728 (2015). doi:10.1038/nnano.2015.172 Author: Arthur J. Olson Interacting with 3D-printed molecular models helps students to grasp insightful concepts on the kinetics and thermodynamics of molecular self-assembly, as Arthur J. Olson explains.
  • Correction

    4 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 10, 660 (2015). doi:10.1038/nnano.2015.166
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Neuroscience - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Optogenetics: 10 years after ChR2 in neurons—views from the community

    Antoine Adamantidis
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 18, 1202 (2015). doi:10.1038/nn.4106 Authors: Antoine Adamantidis, Silvia Arber, Jaideep S Bains, Ernst Bamberg, Antonello Bonci, György Buzsáki, Jessica A Cardin, Rui M Costa, Yang Dan, Yukiko Goda, Ann M Graybiel, Michael Häusser, Peter Hegemann, John R Huguenard, Thomas R Insel, Patricia H Janak, Daniel Johnston, Sheena A Josselyn, Christof Koch, Anatol C Kreitzer, Christian Lüscher, Robert C Malenka, Gero Miesenböck, Georg Nagel, Botond Roska, Mark J Schnitzer, Krishna V Shenoy, Ivan Soltesz, Scott M Sternson, Richard W Tsien, Roger Y Tsien,…
  • ChR2 coming of age

    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 18, 1191 (2015). doi:10.1038/nn.4103 10 years ago, channelrhodopsin-2 was expressed in neurons and shown to control their activity. In this issue, we consider how the field has developed since these early optogenetic experiments.
  • How a fly escapes the reflex trap

    Holger G Krapp
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 18, 1192 (2015). doi:10.1038/nn.4097 Author: Holger G Krapp Reflexes help us maintain a default posture and direction of locomotion. But what if we deliberately want to move differently? In Drosophila, the brain modifies a visually driven stabilization reflex to enable voluntary movements.
  • Modifiers of C9orf72 dipeptide repeat toxicity connect nucleocytoplasmic transport defects to FTD/ALS

    Ana Jovičić
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 18, 1226 (2015). doi:10.1038/nn.4085 Authors: Ana Jovičić, Jerome Mertens, Steven Boeynaems, Elke Bogaert, Noori Chai, Shizuka B Yamada, Joseph W Paul, Shuying Sun, Joseph R Herdy, Gregor Bieri, Nicholas J Kramer, Fred H Gage, Ludo Van Den Bosch, Wim Robberecht & Aaron D Gitler C9orf72 mutations are the most common cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Dipeptide repeat proteins (DPRs) produced by unconventional translation of the C9orf72 repeat expansions cause neurodegeneration in cell culture and in animal models.
  • GABA receptors in a state of fear

    Andrew Holmes
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 18, 1194 (2015). doi:10.1038/nn.4098 Authors: Andrew Holmes & Alon Chen Our internal states can color our memories just as powerfully as the external environment. A study finds that hippocampal GABAA receptors and associated microRNAs are important for generating state-dependent contextual fear memories.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Photonics - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Optomechanics: Artificial magnetic fields

    Oliver Graydon
    26 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Photonics 9, 553 (2015). doi:10.1038/nphoton.2015.172 Author: Oliver Graydon
  • Made in America

    26 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Photonics 9, 549 (2015). doi:10.1038/nphoton.2015.174 US$610 million has been secured for a US initiative into high-tech manufacturing involving 20 states with the hope of leveraging the capabilities of photonics.
  • SESAME for science and peace

    Chris Llewellyn Smith
    26 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Photonics 9, 550 (2015). doi:10.1038/nphoton.2015.157 Author: Chris Llewellyn Smith SESAME is a 2.5 GeV third-generation light source under construction in Jordan. Commissioning will begin in the second half of next year, assuming the funding that is still needed can be found.
  • Fibre optics: Turning the tables on nonlinearity

    Stojan Radic
    26 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Photonics 9, 556 (2015). doi:10.1038/nphoton.2015.163 Author: Stojan Radic The discovery of a new nonlinear light propagation regime in optical fibres paves the way to spectrally brighter lasers and control of signal distortion in communication links.
  • Imaging: Ultrasonic lens

    Rachel Won
    26 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Photonics 9, 553 (2015). doi:10.1038/nphoton.2015.168 Author: Rachel Won
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Photonics - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • Role of microstructure in the electron–hole interaction of hybrid lead halide perovskites

    Giulia Grancini
    16 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Photonics. doi:10.1038/nphoton.2015.151 Authors: Giulia Grancini, Ajay Ram Srimath Kandada, Jarvist M. Frost, Alex J. Barker, Michele De Bastiani, Marina Gandini, Sergio Marras, Guglielmo Lanzani, Aron Walsh & Annamaria Petrozza
  • Electrically driven optical antennas

    Johannes Kern
    16 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Photonics. doi:10.1038/nphoton.2015.141 Authors: Johannes Kern, René Kullock, Jord Prangsma, Monika Emmerling, Martin Kamp & Bert Hecht Unlike radiowave antennas, so far optical nanoantennas cannot be fed by electrical generators. Instead, they are driven by light or indirectly via excited discrete states in active materials in their vicinity. Here we demonstrate the direct electrical driving of an in-plane optical antenna by the broadband quantum-shot noise of electrons tunnelling across its feed gap. The spectrum of the emitted photons is determined by the antenna geometry and…
  • Ab initio quantum-enhanced optical phase estimation using real-time feedback control

    Adriano A. Berni
    9 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Photonics. doi:10.1038/nphoton.2015.139 Authors: Adriano A. Berni, Tobias Gehring, Bo M. Nielsen, Vitus Händchen, Matteo G. A. Paris & Ulrik L. Andersen Optical phase estimation is a vital measurement strategy that is used to perform accurate measurements of various physical quantities including length, velocity and displacements. The precision of such measurements can be greatly enhanced by the use of entangled or squeezed states of light as demonstrated in a variety of different optical systems. Most of these accounts, however, deal with the measurement of a very small shift of…
  • Inverse four-wave mixing and self-parametric amplification in optical fibre

    Sergei K. Turitsyn
    9 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Photonics. doi:10.1038/nphoton.2015.150 Authors: Sergei K. Turitsyn, Anastasia E. Bednyakova, Mikhail P. Fedoruk, Serguei B. Papernyi & Wallace R. L. Clements
  • Plasmon-induced resonance energy transfer for solar energy conversion

    Jiangtian Li
    9 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Photonics. doi:10.1038/nphoton.2015.142 Authors: Jiangtian Li, Scott K. Cushing, Fanke Meng, Tess R. Senty, Alan D. Bristow & Nianqiang Wu
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Physics - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • Single-molecule measurement of the effective temperature in non-equilibrium steady states

    E. Dieterich
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3435 Authors: E. Dieterich, J. Camunas-Soler, M. Ribezzi-Crivellari, U. Seifert & F. Ritort
  • Observation of the nonlinear phase shift due to single post-selected photons

    Amir Feizpour
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3433 Authors: Amir Feizpour, Matin Hallaji, Greg Dmochowski & Aephraim M. Steinberg Over the past years, much effort has gone towards generating interactions between two optical beams so strong that they could be observed at the level of individual photons. Interactions this strong, beyond opening up a new regime in optics, could lead to technologies such as all-optical quantum information processing. However, the extreme weakness of photon–photon scattering has hindered any attempt to observe such interactions at the level of single particles. Here…
  • Effect of magnetic frustration on nematicity and superconductivity in iron chalcogenides

    J. K. Glasbrenner
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3434 Authors: J. K. Glasbrenner, I. I. Mazin, Harald O. Jeschke, P. J. Hirschfeld, R. M. Fernandes & Roser Valentí
  • Attosecond tunnelling interferometry

    O. Pedatzur
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3436 Authors: O. Pedatzur, G. Orenstein, V. Serbinenko, H. Soifer, B. D. Bruner, A. J. Uzan, D. S. Brambila, A. G. Harvey, L. Torlina, F. Morales, O. Smirnova & N. Dudovich Attosecond physics offers new insights into ultrafast quantum phenomena involving electron dynamics on the fastest measurable timescales. The rapid progress in this field enables us to re-visit one of the most fundamental strong-field phenomena: field-induced tunnel ionization. In this work, we employ high-harmonic generation to probe the electron wavefunction during field-induced…
  • Observation of Weyl nodes in TaAs

    B. Q. Lv
    16 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3426 Authors: B. Q. Lv, N. Xu, H. M. Weng, J. Z. Ma, P. Richard, X. C. Huang, L. X. Zhao, G. F. Chen, C. E. Matt, F. Bisti, V. N. Strocov, J. Mesot, Z. Fang, X. Dai, T. Qian, M. Shi & H. Ding In 1929, H. Weyl proposed that the massless solution of the Dirac equation represents a pair of a new type of particles, the so-called Weyl fermions. However, their existence in particle physics remains elusive after more than eight decades. Recently, significant advances in both topological insulators and topological semimetals have provided an alternative way to…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Reviews Cancer - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Tumour immunology: TReg cells, more than a suppression problem

    M. Teresa Villanueva
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 15, 514 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrc4008 Author: M. Teresa Villanueva Chronic intestinal inflammation is associated with the development of colorectal cancer. Regulatory T (TReg) cells suppress inflammatory responses and maintain intestinal homeostasis, and therefore they might mitigate the formation of inflammation-associated tumours. Surprisingly, Geis et al. have found that in mice colonized
  • Genetics: The evil twin

    M. Teresa Villanueva
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 15, 514 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrc4009 Author: M. Teresa Villanueva Some cancers have an abundance of mutations at cytosines on one DNA strand, which is consistent with the mutagenic properties of APOBEC cytidine deaminases. APOBEC3B mRNA expression has been found in various cancers, whereas the role of APOBEC3A as a mutator is less clear.
  • Autophagy: Surviving stress in pancreatic cancer

    Gemma K. Alderton
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 15, 513 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrc4005 Author: Gemma K. Alderton Perera et al. investigated the high levels of autophagy in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC).
  • Imaging: Polyps in technicolour

    M. Teresa Villanueva
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 15, 514 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrc4007 Author: M. Teresa Villanueva Colorectal cancer (CRC) can be prevented by colonoscopy using white light to detect polyps that are then removed. However, small and flat polyps are difficult to detect using this technique. Burggraaf et al. have tested fluorescence-guided colonoscopy using the agent GE-137, a cyclic peptide
  • Therapy: Reinventing the wheel

    M. Teresa Villanueva
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 15, 514 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrc4010 Author: M. Teresa Villanueva Huang et al. have identified that the potassium channel ether-a-go-go 2 (EAG2) promotes tumour growth and metastasis in multiple fly and mouse brain tumour models. In a xenograft model of medulloblastoma, EAG2 knockdown impaired metastasis, and pharmacological inhibition of EAG2 with an FDA-approved antipsychotic
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Reviews Genetics - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Population genetics: One founding population, or two?

    Bryony Jones
    17 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 499 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg4003 Author: Bryony Jones Two new studies investigate the population history of native Americans, and come to differing conclusions. One study, published in Science, reports a single migration via Siberia
  • Pathogen genetics: Sequencing of clinical bacterial isolates

    Denise Waldron
    17 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 499 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg4002 Author: Denise Waldron Roach et al. performed prospective whole-genome sequencing of almost all bacterial isolates collected from a hospital's intensive care units over the course of a year: 12% of isolates that had been assigned a species-level classification via traditional microbiological methods were identified as novel genomospecies,
  • Epigenetics: Chromatin reorganization on a 'mega' scale

    Sarah Seton-Rogers
    17 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 498 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg4000 Author: Sarah Seton-Rogers Fusion oncogenes of NUT (also known as NUTM1) with several different genes, including bromodomain-containing protein 3 (BRD3), BRD4 and NSD3, cause the aggressive squamous cell cancer NUT midline carcinoma (NMC). These gene fusions result in the tethering of the
  • Functional genomics: Large-scale mouse phenotyping

    Denise Waldron
    17 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 499 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg4001 Author: Denise Waldron To aid the characterization of gene–phenotype relationships, de Angelis et al. developed and implemented statistical methods to optimize the design and analysis of multicentre, large-scale, broad-based phenotyping of mouse knockouts. The authors analysed data from over 27,000 mice with a total of 449 mutant
  • Knocking down disease: a progress report on siRNA therapeutics

    Anders Wittrup
    17 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 543 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg3978 Authors: Anders Wittrup & Judy Lieberman Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which downregulate gene expression guided by sequence complementarity, can be used therapeutically to block the synthesis of disease-causing proteins. The main obstacle to siRNA drugs — their delivery into the target cell cytosol — has been overcome to allow suppression of
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Reviews Immunology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Mucosal immunology: Living in harmony

    Lucy Bird
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 15, 527 (2015). doi:10.1038/nri3907 Author: Lucy Bird The mucosal immune system supports intestinal commensalism in multiple ways.
  • Tumour immunology: Malaria alters B cell lymphomagenesis

    Elisabeth Kugelberg
    20 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 15, 528 (2015). doi:10.1038/nri3906 Author: Elisabeth Kugelberg Malaria infection modifies endemic Burkitt lymphomas by inducing a prolonged expansion of germinal centre B cell numbers.
  • Translating nucleic acid-sensing pathways into therapies

    Tobias Junt
    20 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 15, 529 (2015). doi:10.1038/nri3875 Authors: Tobias Junt & Winfried Barchet Nucleic acid sensing by innate receptors initiates immune defences against viruses and other pathogens. A hallmark of this response is the release of interferons (IFNs), which promote protective immunity by inducing IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). A similar ISG signature is found in autoinflammatory and autoimmune conditions,
  • The cytoskeleton in cell-autonomous immunity: structural determinants of host defence

    Serge Mostowy
    20 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 15, 559 (2015). doi:10.1038/nri3877 Authors: Serge Mostowy & Avinash R. Shenoy Host cells use antimicrobial proteins, pathogen-restrictive compartmentalization and cell death in their defence against intracellular pathogens. Recent work has revealed that four components of the cytoskeleton — actin, microtubules, intermediate filaments and septins, which are well known for their roles in cell division, shape and
  • Bacteria, inflammation and cancer

    Jeffrey Pollard
    13 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 15, 528 (2015). doi:10.1038/nri3899 Author: Jeffrey Pollard Jeffrey Pollard describes a 2003 study by Enzler et al. that identified the immune response against bacteria as preventing chronic inflammation-associated tumour development.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Reviews Microbiology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Vaccines: A protective Ebola vaccine

    Cláudio Nunes-Alves
    13 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 526 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3540 Author: Cláudio Nunes-Alves The Ebola epidemic in West Africa is still ongoing, but a new study reports that a ring vaccination strategy — in which contacts, and contacts of contacts, of an infected patient are vaccinated — using rVSV-ZEBOV was successful in preventing infection. The vaccine consists of
  • Bacterial physiology: Hip persisters

    Cláudio Nunes-Alves
    13 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 526 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3538 Author: Cláudio Nunes-Alves Persisters are dormant bacterial populations that contribute to multidrug tolerance (MDT) because they are able to escape treatment with most antibiotics, which target metabolically active cells. A new study now characterizes the molecular basis for persister generation involving HipA, a kinase that inhibits protein synthesis
  • Bacterial toxins: Toxins actin(g) up

    Cláudio Nunes-Alves
    13 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 526 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3539 Author: Cláudio Nunes-Alves Several bacterial pathogens, including Vibrio cholerae, use toxins containing actin crosslinking domains (ACDs) to interfere with the ability of the host cell to polymerize actin. The toxicity of ACD-containing toxins is thought to arise via sequestration of bulk amounts of actin as non-functional oligomers,
  • Microbiome: An encrypted growth signature

    Naomi Attar
    13 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 527 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3544 Author: Naomi Attar Most metagenomic analysis methods are based on the relative abundance of a marker gene or of sets of genes in functional pathways. However, these methods offer a static view of microbial composition and provide no information on growth dynamics. Korem et al. devised a
  • Structural biology: T6SS cases its own tail

    Naomi Attar
    13 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 527 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3543 Author: Naomi Attar The bacterial type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a nanomachine that punctures the membranes of competing bacteria and, during pathogenesis, those of host cells. In addition to the tail, which is composed of a contractile sheath and a tipped arrow that punctures the membrane of
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Metabolism: Human bone marrow can make fat

    Kim Baumann
    20 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 16, 518 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrm4054 Author: Kim Baumann White adipose tissue (WAT) is the main type of adipose tissue in human adults. Whether white adipocyte progenitors derive only from permanently WAT-residing cells or whether cells migrating from other tissues may contribute to adipogenesis is unclear. Rydén et al. investigated subcutaneous WAT from
  • Gene expression: PolyQ repeats regulate transcription

    Kim Baumann
    20 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 16, 518 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrm4055 Author: Kim Baumann Polyglutamine (polyQ) repeats shrink and expand. PolyQ expansion over a certain threshold is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases, but the consequences of moderate repeat variations and their physiological role are unclear. PolyQ repeats are found in eukaryotic transcription regulator genes; by generating multiple repeat variants
  • Microfluidics: reframing biological enquiry

    Todd A. Duncombe
    20 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 16, 554 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrm4041 Authors: Todd A. Duncombe, Augusto M. Tentori & Amy E. Herr The underlying physical properties of microfluidic tools have led to new biological insights through the development of microsystems that can manipulate, mimic and measure biology at a resolution that has not been possible with macroscale tools. Microsystems readily handle sub-microlitre volumes, precisely route predictable laminar
  • Transcription: PAF1 regulates promoter-proximal pausing

    Eytan Zlotorynski
    20 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 16, 518 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrm4053 Author: Eytan Zlotorynski Promoter-proximal pausing of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) precedes transcription elongation, but how Pol II is restrained is unknown. Chen et al. discovered that depletion of Pol II-associated factor 1 (PAF1) in human and fly cells resulted in redistribution of Pol II from promoter-proximal
  • DNA methylation pathways and their crosstalk with histone methylation

    Jiamu Du
    20 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 16, 519 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrm4043 Authors: Jiamu Du, Lianna M. Johnson, Steven E. Jacobsen & Dinshaw J. Patel Methylation of DNA and of histone 3 at Lys 9 (H3K9) are highly correlated with gene silencing in eukaryotes from fungi to humans. Both of these epigenetic marks need to be established at specific regions of the genome and then maintained at these sites through
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Reviews Neuroscience - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Neurodegenerative disease: A neutrophil invasion

    Katherine Whalley
    19 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 510 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrn4014 Author: Katherine Whalley Neutrophil infiltration of the brain drives cognitive decline in mouse models of Alzheimer disease and is regulated by the integrin LFA-1.
  • Cerebral Cortex: Cortical reconstruction

    Darran Yates
    19 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 510 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrn4015 Author: Darran Yates The fine anatomical relationships between brain cells remain mostly unknown. This study examined the connectivity of a 1,500 μm3 volume of mouse neocortex. More than 2,000 29-nm coronal brain sections were generated with an automatic tape-collecting ultramicrotome and used in scanning electron microscopy,
  • Neurotransmitter receptors: Recoding the pathways

    Darran Yates
    19 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 510 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrn4018 Author: Darran Yates In the ventral striatum, motivated behaviour is understood to be encoded through a direct pathway, in which medium spiny neurons (MSNs) project from the nucleus accumbens (NAc) to the ventral mesencephalon (VM), and an indirect pathway, in which NAc MSNs project to ventral pallidum (VP)
  • Circadian rhythms: The rhythm regulator

    Darran Yates
    19 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 510 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrn4017 Author: Darran Yates The small ventral lateral neurons (sLNvs) are the main clock neurons in fruitflies and show circadian changes in excitability and axonal terminal width, which are at their greatest at dawn. This study revealed that sLNvs also show circadian changes in axon volume, suggesting the involvement
  • From the genetic architecture to synaptic plasticity in autism spectrum disorder

    Thomas Bourgeron
    19 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 551 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrn3992 Author: Thomas Bourgeron Genetics studies of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have identified several risk genes that are key regulators of synaptic plasticity. Indeed, many of the risk genes that have been linked to these disorders encode synaptic scaffolding proteins, receptors, cell adhesion molecules or proteins that are involved
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Reviews Cardiology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Aortic disease: Endovascular vs open AAA repair

    Gregory B. Lim
    10 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 12, 500 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2015.122 Author: Gregory B. Lim Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) is generally associated with lower periopertative morality than repair by open surgery and, accordingly, the use of endovascular procedures for AAA repair is increasing. However, a new paper published in The New England Journal of Medicine suggests
  • Prevention: Guidelines with high statin eligibility target risk and are cost-effective

    Robert Phillips
    3 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 12, 500 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2015.119 Author: Robert Phillips The 2013 ACC–AHA guidelines for cholesterol management make millions more people eligible for statin therapy than previous guidelines. The results from two studies show that these guidelines are effective for the identification of those at risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD), and that they are
  • Risk factors: Long-term low mortality in patients without coronary artery calcium

    Robert Phillips
    3 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 12, 501 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2015.120 Author: Robert Phillips Patients who have no detectable coronary artery calcium (CAC) and are in low or intermediate categories of cardiovascular risk have a 15-year prognostic warranty period for all-cause mortality of
  • Anticoagulation therapy: Benefits of extended oral anticoagulation after first episode of pulmonary embolism

    Karina Huynh
    27 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 12, 499 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2015.118 Author: Karina Huynh None of the current clinical practice guidelines offers clear recommendations on the optimal duration of anticoagulation after pulmonary embolism. Previous studies have reported that extending anticoagulant therapy beyond 3–6 months in patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism can reduce the risk of recurrence, but whether this
  • Device therapy: Saving lives with appropriate ICD therapy in elderly patients

    Valentina Kutyifa
    27 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 12, 504 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2015.114 Authors: Valentina Kutyifa & Arthur J. Moss Sudden cardiac death in elderly patients with recent myocardial infarction and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction can be substantially reduced using implantable cardioverter–defibrillators (ICDs) in appropriately selected, high-risk cardiac patients. Increased use of ICD therapy among eligible elderly patients will save lives.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Oncology drug pricing structure is broken

    Lisa Hutchinson
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 12, 499 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2015.141 Author: Lisa Hutchinson When attending the Worldwide Innovative Networking (WIN) conference in Paris at the end of June, a sobering comment made by one presenter, which was echoed by the audience and panellists, was that the biggest toxicity to cancer patients is the cost of cancer treatment—namely, drugs.
  • Haematological cancer: Promising results of BCL2 inhibition

    Diana Romero
    10 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 12, 504 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2015.139 Author: Diana Romero Although often associated with a favorable prognosis, acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is sometimes refractory to treatment. Studies have shown that the TCF3–HLF fusion transcript defines a group of patients with ALL who have a particularly poor prognosis. Using an integrated drug-response profiling approach in
  • Breast cancer: Weekly paclitaxel—still preferred first-line taxane for mBC

    Joseph Gligorov
    10 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 12, 508 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2015.137 Authors: Joseph Gligorov & Sandrine Richard Taxane-based regimens are among the preferred first-line chemotherapy options for metastatic breast cancer, with weekly paclitaxel considered equivalent to 3-weekly docetaxel. The CALGB 40502/NCCTG N063H (Alliance) trial has now compared bevacizumab plus weekly paclitaxel, nab-paclitaxel, or ixabepilone in this setting; ixabepilone was inferior and nab-paclitaxel was not superior, with a trend towards inferiority. Paclitaxel thus remains the standard-of-care taxane…
  • Imaging: Improving detection of bone metastases in renal cell carcinoma

    Lisa Hutchinson
    10 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 12, 503 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2015.138 Author: Lisa Hutchinson Current clinical imaging tests often fail to detect small bone metastases from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Detection of metastases is crucial to determine whether certain forms of treatment might be suitable for individual patients. 18F-NaF PET–CT has been used in other cancers to more-accurately
  • Breast cancer: Rational use of regional nodal irradiation needed

    David Killock
    3 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 12, 501 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2015.136 Author: David Killock Irradiation of the axillary, supraclavicular and/or internal mammary (regional) lymph nodes is part of adjuvant therapy for breast cancer. This approach has been examined over many decades, with the aim of combating common lymph-node metastases. Initial results were disappointing, and non-cancer-related mortality owing to cardiac
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Reviews Endocrinology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Stem cells: Donor-derived bone marrow cells become adipocytes in recipients

    David Holmes
    3 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Endocrinology 11, 506 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrendo.2015.127 Author: David Holmes Bone-marrow-derived progenitor cells contribute to adipogenesis in patients who have undergone allogeneic transplantation, according to a new study. The findings add clarity to the long-standing debate as to whether bone-marrow-derived cells can form cells of a nonhaematopoietic lineage in peripheral tissues.Mikael Rydén and colleagues
  • Endocrine disruptors: DDT, endocrine disruption and breast cancer

    Ana M. Soto
    3 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Endocrinology 11, 507 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrendo.2015.125 Authors: Ana M. Soto & Carlos Sonnenschein Developmental exposure to endocrine disruptors is suspected to be one of the main factors responsible for the increased incidence of breast cancer in industrialized countries. New data published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism show that exposure to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane during fetal life is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer.
  • Congenital generalized lipodystrophies—new insights into metabolic dysfunction

    Nivedita Patni
    3 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Endocrinology 11, 522 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrendo.2015.123 Authors: Nivedita Patni & Abhimanyu Garg Congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL) is a heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a near complete lack of adipose tissue from birth and, later in life, the development of metabolic complications, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertriglyceridaemia and hepatic steatosis. Four distinct subtypes of CGL exist: type
  • Physiological and pathophysiological roles of NAMPT and NAD metabolism

    Antje Garten
    27 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Endocrinology 11, 535 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrendo.2015.117 Authors: Antje Garten, Susanne Schuster, Melanie Penke, Theresa Gorski, Tommaso de Giorgis & Wieland Kiess Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is a regulator of the intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) pool. NAD is an essential coenzyme involved in cellular redox reactions and is a substrate for NAD-dependent enzymes. In various metabolic disorders and during ageing, levels of NAD are decreased. Through its
  • Diabetes: Dysglycaemia as a cause of cardiovascular outcomes

    Hertzel C. Gerstein
    27 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Endocrinology 11, 508 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrendo.2015.118 Author: Hertzel C. Gerstein The long-term follow-up of the Veteran Affairs Diabetes Trial is important for researchers and clinicians. For the former, this study supports the conclusion that dysglycaemia causes cardiovascular outcomes; for the latter, it shows that in high-risk individuals, the benefits of lowering glucose are modest and take a long time to emerge.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Reviews Nephrology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • RAS blockade: Nephroprotection by dual RAS blockade—a welcome back

    Piero Ruggenenti
    3 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Nephrology 11, 507 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrneph.2015.132 Authors: Piero Ruggenenti & Giuseppe Remuzzi A new meta-analysis shows that dual blockade of the renin–angiotensin system is the most effective approach to prevent end-stage renal disease in patients with diabetes and kidney disease. Combination therapy should therefore be reconsidered as the most powerful tool for nephroprotection, provided that treatment is individually tailored by careful dose-titration.
  • Acute kidney injury: Can remote ischaemic preconditioning prevent AKI?

    Anna Zuk
    27 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Nephrology 11, 512 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrneph.2015.119 Authors: Anna Zuk & Joseph V. Bonventre A randomized multicentre controlled study of 240 cardiac surgery patients at high risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) has demonstrated that remote ischaemic preconditioning can reduce the rate of AKI and requirement for renal replacement therapy. These findings suggest this procedure could be a promising therapeutic option for this high-risk patient group.
  • Renal injury: Prevention of talin-1-mediated activation of neutrophils protects against renal ischaemia–reperfusion injury

    Jessica K. Edwards
    27 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Nephrology 11, 506 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrneph.2015.130 Author: Jessica K. Edwards Integrins are αβ heterodimeric cell-adhesion molecules that support many biological processes, such as neutrophil-mediated tissue injury in inflammatory disorders. New data from Rodger McEver and colleagues show that the large cytoplasmic protein talin-1 is required for integrin activation in renal ischaemia–reperfusion (I/R) injury and neutrophil
  • Chronic kidney disease: ECGs help predict risk of death in CKD

    Jessica K. Edwards
    27 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Nephrology 11, 505 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrneph.2015.129 Author: Jessica K. Edwards The standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) is a routine diagnostic test that provides a comprehensive overview of cardiac arrhythmias and conduction, but debate exists regarding its utility in low and intermediate-risk populations, such as those with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Now, findings from the Chronic Renal
  • Development and application of human adult stem or progenitor cell organoids

    Maarten B. Rookmaaker
    27 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Nephrology 11, 546 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrneph.2015.118 Authors: Maarten B. Rookmaaker, Frans Schutgens, Marianne C. Verhaar & Hans Clevers Adult stem or progenitor cell organoids are 3D adult-organ-derived epithelial structures that contain self-renewing and organ-specific stem or progenitor cells as well as differentiated cells. This organoid culture system was first established in murine intestine and subsequently developed for several other organs and translated to
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Reviews Rheumatology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Bone: Targeting myostatin could prevent bone destruction in inflammatory arthritis

    Sarah Onuora
    10 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Rheumatology 11, 504 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrrheum.2015.113 Author: Sarah Onuora Myostatin has been indirectly linked with bone turnover through its influence on muscle, but new evidence highlights a direct role for this transforming growth factor-β family member in inflammatory joint destruction, as occurs in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The report in Nature Medicine also indicates
  • Rheumatoid arthritis: Microbiome reflects status of RA and response to therapy

    Robert Phillips
    3 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Rheumatology 11, 502 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrrheum.2015.109 Author: Robert Phillips Microbial components have been implicated in the aetiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but the identity of microbes that associate with this disease is unclear. The results of a new metagenome-wide association study (MGWAS) of human microbiomes revealed multiple links with RA that can be of
  • Therapy: New fusion protein reduces IL-1-mediated inflammation

    João H. Duarte
    3 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Rheumatology 11, 503 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrrheum.2015.108 Author: João H. Duarte Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), a naturally occurring inhibitor of serine proteases, has been implicated in caspase-1-independent processing of IL-1β—a major mediator of inflammation in gouty arthritis. Leo Joosten and colleagues now show that administration of recombinant human AAT fused with an IgG1-Fc fragment (AAT-Fc) suppresses inflammation in
  • Osteoarthritis: Cartilage matrix stiffness regulates chondrocyte metabolism and OA pathogenesis

    Sarah Onuora
    3 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Rheumatology 11, 504 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrrheum.2015.107 Author: Sarah Onuora Cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) is known to undergo remodeling as osteoarthritis (OA) progresses, manifesting as loss of ECM flexibility even before cartilage destruction occurs; however, the molecular basis of this ECM stiffening is unclear. New research indicates that these mechanical alterations to the ECM promote
  • Rheumatoid arthritis: 2014 treat-to-target RA recommendations—strategy is key

    Tom Huizinga
    20 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Rheumatology 11, 509 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrrheum.2015.98 Authors: Tom Huizinga & Rachel Knevel The treatment recommendations for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have been updated. Among the changes included, rheumatologists are advised to share treatment decision-making with patients and to maximize patients' quality of life by aiming for clinical remission. The update is based on scientific evidence, but more research is needed to strengthen RA treatment strategies.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nature Reviews Urology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Novel methods for mapping the cavernous nerves during radical prostatectomy

    Nathaniel M. Fried
    9 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Urology 12, 451 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrurol.2015.174 Authors: Nathaniel M. Fried & Arthur L. Burnett The cavernous nerves, which course along the surface of the prostate gland, are responsible for erectile function. During radical prostatectomy, urologists are challenged in preserving these nerves and their function. Cavernous nerves are microscopic and show variable location in different patients; therefore, postoperative sexual potency
  • Prostate cancer: AR splice variant dimerization—clinical implications

    Emmanuel S. Antonarakis
    9 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Urology 12, 431 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrurol.2015.184 Authors: Emmanuel S. Antonarakis & Jun Luo Androgen receptor splice variants might be associated with castration resistance in prostate cancer as well as resistance to hormonal therapies including abiraterone and enzalutamide. New data demonstrate that splice variants can form dimers with each other as well as with the full-length androgen receptor, and that dimerization is required for androgen-independent transcriptional activation of target genes.
  • Infectious disease: Blocking mTOR inhibits HIV-1

    Clemens Thoma
    27 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Urology 12, 417 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrurol.2015.185 Author: Clemens Thoma INK128, a catalytic inhibitor of cellular mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) active against both mTORC1 and mTORC2 complexes, blocks HIV-1 entry and transcription, according to a new study in PNAS. This agent could provide a novel strategy of HIV suppression, particularly for patients with
  • Prostate cancer: Intrapatient heterogeneity in prostate cancer

    Himisha Beltran
    27 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Urology 12, 430 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrurol.2015.182 Authors: Himisha Beltran & Francesca Demichelis A newly published study used whole-genome sequencing of multiple prostate tumour foci from several patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer to track evolutionary patterns and delineate the marked intrapatient molecular heterogeneity of this disease. Their findings have potential implications for the development of clinical prognostic and predictive biomarkers.
  • Kidney cancer: Novel targets in altered tumour metabolism in kidney cancer

    Denise R. Minton
    27 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Urology 12, 428 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrurol.2015.168 Authors: Denise R. Minton & David M. Nanus Alterations in metabolism are fundamental to the development and progression of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Through use of a combined proteomic and metabolomic analysis approach, a new paper enhances our understanding of the metabolomic alterations that occur in RCC and highlights new therapeutic targets.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Naturejobs - Search results

  • Tenure-Track Position in Developmental Biology

    28 Aug 2015 | 10:15 am
    Tenure-Track Position in Developmental Biology Laboratory of Cellular and Developmental Biology National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases National Institutes of Health Department of Health and Human Services We seek an outstanding scientist to direct a vigorous, innovative research program in molecular mechanisms of development and differentiation. Applicants must be highly motivated and have a demonstrated track record through publications that address significant bio…
  • Locum Associate Editor

    28 Aug 2015 | 9:27 am
    Nature Reviews Genetics has a vacancy for a full-time Associate Editor based in London, UK, for an initial period of 6 months. The journal aims to provide an authoritative, accessible and topical first port of call for researchers in the field of genetics & genomics. For more information about the journal, please visit http://www.nature.com/nrg. The Associate Editor position is a demanding and intellectually stimulating role that calls for a keen interest in the practice and communicatio…
  • Art Editor

    28 Aug 2015 | 8:39 am
    A position is available for an enthusiastic, self-motivated and flexible Art Editor to work on our UK-based Nature Research Journals, a diverse series of world-leading science titles. You will be able to communicate effectively with editorial colleagues and authors alike to produce striking and attractive artwork. The role will also involve some layout, handling of author proofs and managing content to and from external typesetters. You must have exceptional Adobe Illustrator drawing skills …
  • Postdoctoral Researcher

    28 Aug 2015 | 8:22 am
    Postdoctoral ResearcherSchool of Geographical SciencesFixed term contract staffFull timeSalary £31,342 – £33,242 per annumJob number: ACAD101628 The School of Geographical Sciences is looking to recruit a Postdoctoral Researcher for a project researching biological and physical influences on the albedo of the Greenland Ice Sheet, as part of the Black and Bloom project – Geographical Sciences and Life Sciences The primary aim of this project is to determine the influen…
  • Postdoctoral Researcher

    28 Aug 2015 | 8:22 am
    Postdoctoral ResearcherSchool of Geographical SciencesFixed term contract staffFull timeSalary £31,342 – £33,242 per annumJob number: ACAD101628 The School of Geographical Sciences is looking to recruit a Postdoctoral Researcher for a project researching biological and physical influences on the albedo of the Greenland Ice Sheet, as part of the Black and Bloom project – Geographical Sciences and Life Sciences. The primary aim of this project is to determine the influe…
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    European Journal of Human Genetics - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Challenges and solutions for gene identification in the presence of familial locus heterogeneity

    Atteeq U Rehman
    12 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Challenges and solutions for gene identification in the presence of familial locus heterogeneity European Journal of Human Genetics 23, 1207 (September 2015). doi:10.1038/ejhg.2014.266 Authors: Atteeq U Rehman, Regie Lyn P Santos-Cortez, Meghan C Drummond, Mohsin Shahzad, Kwanghyuk Lee, Robert J Morell, Muhammad Ansar, Abid Jan, Xin Wang, Abdul Aziz, Saima Riazuddin, Joshua D Smith, Gao T Wang, Zubair M Ahmed, Khitab Gul, A Eliot Shearer, Richard J H Smith, Jay Shendure, Michael J Bamshad, Deborah A Nickerson, University of Washington Center for Mendelian Genomics, John Hinnant, Shaheen N…
  • Reply to Pembrey et al: ‘ZNF277 microdeletions, specific language impairment and the meiotic mismatch methylation (3M) hypothesis’

    Fabiola Ceroni
    12 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Reply to Pembrey et al: ‘ZNF277 microdeletions, specific language impairment and the meiotic mismatch methylation (3M) hypothesis’ European Journal of Human Genetics 23, 1113 (September 2015). doi:10.1038/ejhg.2014.275 Authors: Fabiola Ceroni, Nuala H Simpson, Clyde Francks, Gillian Baird, Gina Conti-Ramsden, Ann Clark, Patrick F Bolton, Elizabeth R Hennessy, Peter Donnelly, David R Bentley, Hilary Martin, IMGSAC, SLI Consortium, WGS500 Consortium, Jeremy Parr, Alistair T Pagnamenta, Elena Maestrini, Elena Bacchelli, Simon E Fisher & Dianne F Newbury
  • A human laterality disorder associated with a homozygous WDR16 deletion

    Asaf Ta-Shma
    12 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    A human laterality disorder associated with a homozygous WDR16 deletion European Journal of Human Genetics 23, 1262 (September 2015). doi:10.1038/ejhg.2014.265 Authors: Asaf Ta-Shma, Zeev Perles, Barak Yaacov, Marion Werner, Ayala Frumkin, Azaria JJT Rein & Orly Elpeleg
  • The EuroBioBank Network: 10 years of hands-on experience of collaborative, transnational biobanking for rare diseases

    Marina Mora
    12 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    The EuroBioBank Network: 10 years of hands-on experience of collaborative, transnational biobanking for rare diseases European Journal of Human Genetics 23, 1116 (September 2015). doi:10.1038/ejhg.2014.272 Authors: Marina Mora, Corrado Angelini, Fabrizia Bignami, Anne-Mary Bodin, Marco Crimi, Jeanne- Hélène Di Donato, Alex Felice, Cécile Jaeger, Veronika Karcagi, Yann LeCam, Stephen Lynn, Marija Meznaric, Maurizio Moggio, Lucia Monaco, Luisa Politano, Manuel Posada de la Paz, Safaa Saker, Peter Schneiderat, Monica Ensini, Barbara Garavaglia, David Gurwitz, Diana Johnson,…
  • Isolation and prominent aboriginal maternal legacy in the present-day population of La Gomera (Canary Islands)

    Rosa Fregel
    12 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Isolation and prominent aboriginal maternal legacy in the present-day population of La Gomera (Canary Islands) European Journal of Human Genetics 23, 1236 (September 2015). doi:10.1038/ejhg.2014.251 Authors: Rosa Fregel, Vicente M Cabrera, José M Larruga, Juan C Hernández, Alejandro Gámez, Jose J Pestano, Matilde Arnay & Ana M González
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Log in