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  • Cleavage of tau by asparagine endopeptidase mediates the neurofibrillary pathology in Alzheimer's disease

    Nature Medicine - AOP - nature.com science feeds
    Zhentao Zhang
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Medicine. doi:10.1038/nm.3700 Authors: Zhentao Zhang, Mingke Song, Xia Liu, Seong Su Kang, Il-Sun Kwon, Duc M Duong, Nicholas T Seyfried, William T Hu, Zhixue Liu, Jian-Zhi Wang, Liming Cheng, Yi E Sun, Shan Ping Yu, Allan I Levey & Keqiang Ye
  • Rick Morimoto

    Nature Chemical Biology - Issue - nature.com science feeds
    Catherine Goodman
    16 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 10, 875 (2014). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1682 Author: Catherine Goodman A pioneer in proteostasis is changing the way we think about organismal biology and human disease.
  • Exploiting CRISPR-Cas nucleases to produce sequence-specific antimicrobials

    Nature Biotechnology - AOP - nature.com science feeds
    David Bikard
    4 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3043 Authors: David Bikard, Chad W Euler, Wenyan Jiang, Philip M Nussenzweig, Gregory W Goldberg, Xavier Duportet, Vincent A Fischetti & Luciano A Marraffini Antibiotics target conserved bacterial cellular pathways or growth functions and therefore cannot selectively kill specific members of a complex microbial population. Here, we develop programmable, sequence-specific antimicrobials using the RNA-guided nuclease Cas9 (refs.1,2) delivered by a bacteriophage. We show that Cas9, reprogrammed to target virulence genes, kills virulent, but not…
  • Tetherin signaling

    Nature Immunology - Issue - nature.com science feeds
    Laurie A Dempsey
    19 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Immunology 15, 1008 (2014). doi:10.1038/ni.3018 Author: Laurie A Dempsey
  • Electric Grand Prix cars to be powered by algae-based generators

    Nature Biotechnology - Issue - nature.com science feeds
    8 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology 32, 965 (2014). doi:10.1038/nbt1014-965b
 
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    Nature - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Universities challenged

    14 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Universities challenged Nature 514, 7522 (2014). doi:10.1038/514273a The accelerating pace of change in today’s world means that universities must modify how they fulfil their function of seeking and sharing knowledge.
  • Dust to dust

    13 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Dust to dust Nature 514, 7522 (2014). doi:10.1038/514273b What lessons can be learned from the presentation of the gravitational-waves story?
  • Review rewards

    14 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Review rewards Nature 514, 7522 (2014). doi:10.1038/514274a Welcome efforts are being made to recognize academics who give up their time to peer review.
  • How terror-proof is your economy?

    Erwann Michel-Kerjan
    14 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    How terror-proof is your economy? Nature 514, 7522 (2014). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/514275a Author: Erwann Michel-Kerjan Scientists can help to develop a financial safety net by providing transparent market data and loss-impact analysis, says Erwann Michel-Kerjan.
  • Meteorology: Weather explains Asian glacier survival

    14 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Meteorology: Weather explains Asian glacier survival Nature 514, 7522 (2014). doi:10.1038/514276a Some glaciers in central Asia could be weathering climate change better than those in neighbouring mountain ranges because of different seasonal weather patterns.Geoscientists have puzzled over why the glaciers of the Karakoram region (pictured) have not receded as much as others nearby. A team
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  • Reductive dehalogenase structure suggests a mechanism for B12-dependent dehalogenation

    Karl A. P. Payne
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 19 October 2014. doi:10.1038/nature13901 Authors: Karl A. P. Payne, Carolina P. Quezada, Karl Fisher, Mark S. Dunstan, Fraser A. Collins, Hanno Sjuts, Colin Levy, Sam Hay, Stephen E. J. Rigby & David Leys Organohalide chemistry underpins many industrial and agricultural processes, and a large proportion of environmental pollutants are organohalides. Nevertheless, organohalide chemistry is not exclusively of anthropogenic origin, with natural abiotic and biological processes contributing to the global halide cycle. Reductive dehalogenases are responsible…
  • Hepatitis A virus and the origins of picornaviruses

    Xiangxi Wang
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 19 October 2014. doi:10.1038/nature13806 Authors: Xiangxi Wang, Jingshan Ren, Qiang Gao, Zhongyu Hu, Yao Sun, Xuemei Li, David J. Rowlands, Weidong Yin, Junzhi Wang, David I. Stuart, Zihe Rao & Elizabeth E. Fry Hepatitis A virus (HAV) remains enigmatic, despite 1.4 million cases worldwide annually. It differs radically from other picornaviruses, existing in an enveloped form and being unusually stable, both genetically and physically, but has proved difficult to study. Here we report high-resolution X-ray structures for the mature virus and the empty…
  • Copulation in antiarch placoderms and the origin of gnathostome internal fertilization

    John A. Long
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 19 October 2014. doi:10.1038/nature13825 Authors: John A. Long, Elga Mark-Kurik, Zerina Johanson, Michael S. Y. Lee, Gavin C. Young, Zhu Min, Per E. Ahlberg, Michael Newman, Roger Jones, Jan den Blaauwen, Brian Choo & Kate Trinajstic Reproduction in jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) involves either external or internal fertilization. It is commonly argued that internal fertilization can evolve from external, but not the reverse. Male copulatory claspers are present in certain placoderms, fossil jawed vertebrates retrieved as a paraphyletic segment of the…
  • Suppression of cooling by strong magnetic fields in white dwarf stars

    G. Valyavin
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 19 October 2014. doi:10.1038/nature13836 Authors: G. Valyavin, D. Shulyak, G. A. Wade, K. Antonyuk, S. V. Zharikov, G. A. Galazutdinov, S. Plachinda, S. Bagnulo, L. Fox Machado, M. Alvarez, D. M. Clark, J. M. Lopez, D. Hiriart, Inwoo Han, Young-Beom Jeon, C. Zurita, R. Mujica, T. Burlakova, T. Szeifert & A. Burenkov Isolated cool white dwarf stars more often have strong magnetic fields than young, hotter white dwarfs, which has been a puzzle because magnetic fields are expected to decay with time but a cool surface suggests that the star is old. In…
  • Identification of multipotent mammary stem cells by protein C receptor expression

    Daisong Wang
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 19 October 2014. doi:10.1038/nature13851 Authors: Daisong Wang, Cheguo Cai, Xiaobing Dong, Qing Cissy Yu, Xiao-Ou Zhang, Li Yang & Yi Arial Zeng The mammary gland is composed of multiple types of epithelial cells, which are generated by mammary stem cells (MaSCs) residing at the top of the hierarchy. However, the existence of these multipotent MaSCs remains controversial and the nature of such cells is unknown. Here we demonstrate that protein C receptor (Procr), a novel Wnt target in the mammary gland, marks a unique population of multipotent mouse…
 
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    Scientific American

  • Who Has the Best Fuel Economy?

    Mark Fischetti
    13 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Scientific American 311, 90 (2014). doi:10.1038/scientificamerican1114-90 Authors: Mark Fischetti & Kevin Schultz Contrary to claims, not everyone is No. 1
  • Letters

    13 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Scientific American 311, 8 (2014). doi:10.1038/scientificamerican1114-8
  • Catching Some Rays

    Debra Weiner
    13 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Scientific American 311, 32 (2014). doi:10.1038/scientificamerican1114-32 Author: Debra Weiner An embattled cosmic-ray telescope gets a lift
  • 50, 100 & 150 Years Ago

    Daniel C. Schlenoff
    13 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Scientific American 311, 89 (2014). doi:10.1038/scientificamerican1114-89 Author: Daniel C. Schlenoff
  • Quick Hits

    13 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Scientific American 311, 27 (2014). doi:10.1038/scientificamerican1114-27a
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    Scientific American Mind

  • Cyborg Confidential

    Sandra Upson
    15 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Scientific American Mind 25, 30 (2014). doi:10.1038/scientificamericanmind1114-30 Author: Sandra Upson Hooking the brain up to a computer can do more than let the severely disabled move artificial limbs. It is also revealing the secrets of how we learn
  • All-Purpose Antidepressants

    Julia Calderone
    15 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Scientific American Mind 25, 20 (2014). doi:10.1038/scientificamericanmind1114-20 Author: Julia Calderone Doctors are increasingly prescribing SSRIs to treat more than just depression
  • Happy Birthday to Us

    Sandra Upson
    15 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Scientific American Mind 25, 1 (2014). doi:10.1038/scientificamericanmind1114-1 Author: Sandra Upson
  • Hitting Just the Right Neurons

    Julia Calderone
    15 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Scientific American Mind 25, 8 (2014). doi:10.1038/scientificamericanmind1114-8b Author: Julia Calderone Noninvasive fields zap specific areas
  • Upgrading the Brain

    15 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Scientific American Mind 25, 7 (2014). doi:10.1038/scientificamericanmind1114-7 Technology is shaping our thinking about mental abilities and their improvement
 
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    Nature Biotechnology - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • In vivo interrogation of gene function in the mammalian brain using CRISPR-Cas9

    Lukasz Swiech
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3055 Authors: Lukasz Swiech, Matthias Heidenreich, Abhishek Banerjee, Naomi Habib, Yinqing Li, John Trombetta, Mriganka Sur & Feng Zhang Probing gene function in the mammalian brain can be greatly assisted with methods to manipulate the genome of neurons in vivo. The clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease (Cas)9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) can be used to edit single or multiple genes in replicating eukaryotic cells, resulting in frame-shifting insertion/deletion (indel) mutations and…
  • Comparative analyses of C4 and C3 photosynthesis in developing leaves of maize and rice

    Lin Wang
    11 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3019 Authors: Lin Wang, Angelika Czedik-Eysenberg, Rachel A Mertz, Yaqing Si, Takayuki Tohge, Adriano Nunes-Nesi, Stephanie Arrivault, Lauren K Dedow, Douglas W Bryant, Wen Zhou, Jiajia Xu, Sarit Weissmann, Anthony Studer, Pinghua Li, Cankui Zhang, Therese LaRue, Ying Shao, Zehong Ding, Qi Sun, Rohan V Patel, Robert Turgeon, Xinguang Zhu, Nicholas J Provart, Todd C Mockler, Alisdair R Fernie, Mark Stitt, Peng Liu & Thomas P Brutnell
  • Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells to cells similar to cord-blood endothelial colony–forming cells

    Nutan Prasain
    11 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3048 Authors: Nutan Prasain, Man Ryul Lee, Sasidhar Vemula, Jonathan Luke Meador, Momoko Yoshimoto, Michael J Ferkowicz, Alexa Fett, Manav Gupta, Brian M Rapp, Mohammad Reza Saadatzadeh, Michael Ginsberg, Olivier Elemento, Younghee Lee, Sherry L Voytik-Harbin, Hyung Min Chung, Ki Sung Hong, Emma Reid, Christina L O'Neill, Reinhold J Medina, Alan W Stitt, Michael P Murphy, Shahin Rafii, Hal E Broxmeyer & Mervin C Yoder The ability to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells into endothelial cells with properties of cord-blood endothelial…
  • A bioinspired omniphobic surface coating on medical devices prevents thrombosis and biofouling

    Daniel C Leslie
    11 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3020 Authors: Daniel C Leslie, Anna Waterhouse, Julia B Berthet, Thomas M Valentin, Alexander L Watters, Abhishek Jain, Philseok Kim, Benjamin D Hatton, Arthur Nedder, Kathryn Donovan, Elana H Super, Caitlin Howell, Christopher P Johnson, Thy L Vu, Dana E Bolgen, Sami Rifai, Anne R Hansen, Michael Aizenberg, Michael Super, Joanna Aizenberg & Donald E Ingber
  • Exploiting CRISPR-Cas nucleases to produce sequence-specific antimicrobials

    David Bikard
    4 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3043 Authors: David Bikard, Chad W Euler, Wenyan Jiang, Philip M Nussenzweig, Gregory W Goldberg, Xavier Duportet, Vincent A Fischetti & Luciano A Marraffini Antibiotics target conserved bacterial cellular pathways or growth functions and therefore cannot selectively kill specific members of a complex microbial population. Here, we develop programmable, sequence-specific antimicrobials using the RNA-guided nuclease Cas9 (refs.1,2) delivered by a bacteriophage. We show that Cas9, reprogrammed to target virulence genes, kills virulent, but not…
 
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    Nature Chemical Biology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Cell cycle: Mitotic tag team

    Grant Miura
    16 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 10, 876 (2014). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1675 Author: Grant Miura
  • Protein turnover: Mitochondrial immaturity

    Grant Miura
    16 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 10, 877 (2014). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1679 Author: Grant Miura
  • Sculpting the proteome with small molecules

    Randall W King
    16 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 10, 870 (2014). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1671 Authors: Randall W King & Daniel Finley The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) pervades the biology of eukaryotes. Because it depends on the activity of hundreds of different enzymes and protein-protein interactions, the UPS provides many opportunities for selective modulation of the pathway with small molecules. Here we discuss the principles that underlie the development of effective inhibitors or activators of the pathway. We emphasize insights from structural analysis and describe strategies for evaluating the…
  • Carbohydrates: Cutting out starch

    Catherine Goodman
    16 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 10, 877 (2014). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1677 Author: Catherine Goodman
  • Rick Morimoto

    Catherine Goodman
    16 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 10, 875 (2014). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1682 Author: Catherine Goodman A pioneer in proteostasis is changing the way we think about organismal biology and human disease.
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    Nature Chemistry

  • Atom-efficient regioselective 1,2-dearomatization of functionalized pyridines by an earth-abundant organolanthanide catalyst

    Alexander S. Dudnik
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2087 Authors: Alexander S. Dudnik, Victoria L. Weidner, Alessandro Motta, Massimiliano Delferro & Tobin J. Marks Selective pyridine dearomatization processes traditionally use precious metal catalysts with reagents in stoichiometric excess, and are not well-understood mechanistically. Now, efficient 1,2-regioselective pyridine dearomatization is achieved using equimolar pinacolborane and an earth-abundant lanthanide catalyst. Mechanistic and theoretical studies elucidate the reaction mechanism and explain observed reactivity trends.
  • DNA brick crystals with prescribed depths

    Yonggang Ke
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2083 Authors: Yonggang Ke, Luvena L. Ong, Wei Sun, Jie Song, Mingdong Dong, William M. Shih & Peng Yin The programmed assembly of single DNA strands into bricks and ultimately micrometre-sized two-dimensional crystals with prescribed depths up to 80 nm is described. These crystals display intricate three-dimensional features including continuous or discontinuous cavities and channels with nanometre precision, and can pack DNA helices in parallel or perpendicularly to the plane of the crystals.
  • Switching on the fluorescence of 2-aminopurine by site-selective microhydration

    Simon Lobsiger
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2086 Authors: Simon Lobsiger, Susan Blaser, Rajeev K. Sinha, Hans-Martin Frey & Samuel Leutwyler The adenine analogue 2-aminopurine has been considered as intrinsically fluorescent and is widely used in biochemical assays to probe DNA and RNA structure. It is now shown that the molecule alone is nearly non-fluorescent, however, its fluorescence is increased by up to 95 times through hydrogen bonding to a single water molecule.
  • Self-assembling hydrogel scaffolds for photocatalytic hydrogen production

    Adam S. Weingarten
    4 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2075 Authors: Adam S. Weingarten, Roman V. Kazantsev, Liam C. Palmer, Mark McClendon, Andrew R. Koltonow, Amanda P. S. Samuel, Derek J. Kiebala, Michael R. Wasielewski & Samuel I. Stupp Self-assembled ribbons of perylene amphiphiles have been shown to crystallize in the presence of a nickel-based hydrogen production catalyst, allowing efficient electronic coupling between the perylene chromophores. This hydrogel material photocatalyses the production of H2, and can be shaped and placed on surfaces for incorporation into devices.
  • Direct observation of a borane–silane complex involved in frustrated Lewis-pair-mediated hydrosilylations

    Adrian Y. Houghton
    27 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2063 Authors: Adrian Y. Houghton, Juha Hurmalainen, Akseli Mansikkamäki, Warren E. Piers & Heikki M. Tuononen Comprehensive solution and solid-state characterization of an adduct between a Lewis acidic perfluoroaryl borane and an electron-rich silane is demonstrated. This has long been proposed as an intermediate in the ‘frustrated’ Lewis-pair hydrosilylation of C=C, C=O and C=N double bonds, but its existence has, so far, only been inferred from indirect experimental evidence.
 
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    Nature Genetics - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Chromatin looping and globin expression

    Emily Niemitz
    25 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 46, 1050 (2014). doi:10.1038/ng.3109 Author: Emily Niemitz
  • Growing quality

    25 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 46, 1043 (2014). doi:10.1038/ng.3115 Brazil's success in applying a systems approach to agricultural productivity has been rapidly followed by an expansion in postgraduate training with particular strength in agronomy, plant molecular biology and biotechnology. Research publications with international impact will be a key to sustaining and exporting these successes.
  • David H. Dressler 1941–2014

    Huntington Potter
    25 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 46, 1044 (2014). doi:10.1038/ng.3099 Author: Huntington Potter
  • Single-cell genomics in the brain

    Brooke LaFlamme
    25 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 46, 1050 (2014). doi:10.1038/ng.3111 Author: Brooke LaFlamme
  • Tetrad analysis in the mouse

    Danny E Miller
    25 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 46, 1045 (2014). doi:10.1038/ng.3104 Authors: Danny E Miller & R Scott Hawley Meiotic tetrad analysis is a powerful tool for analyzing all four products of a single meiosis. A new method for tetrad analysis in mammals provides valuable insights into the mechanisms that mediate the exchange of DNA sequences between homologs during meiosis and their influence on the evolution of recombination hotspots.
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  • Haplotype-resolved whole-genome sequencing by contiguity-preserving transposition and combinatorial indexing

    Sasan Amini
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics. doi:10.1038/ng.3119 Authors: Sasan Amini, Dmitry Pushkarev, Lena Christiansen, Emrah Kostem, Tom Royce, Casey Turk, Natasha Pignatelli, Andrew Adey, Jacob O Kitzman, Kandaswamy Vijayan, Mostafa Ronaghi, Jay Shendure, Kevin L Gunderson & Frank J Steemers
  • Comprehensive variation discovery in single human genomes

    Neil I Weisenfeld
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics. doi:10.1038/ng.3121 Authors: Neil I Weisenfeld, Shuangye Yin, Ted Sharpe, Bayo Lau, Ryan Hegarty, Laurie Holmes, Brian Sogoloff, Diana Tabbaa, Louise Williams, Carsten Russ, Chad Nusbaum, Eric S Lander, Iain MacCallum & David B Jaffe
  • Palindromic GOLGA8 core duplicons promote chromosome 15q13.3 microdeletion and evolutionary instability

    Francesca Antonacci
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics. doi:10.1038/ng.3120 Authors: Francesca Antonacci, Megan Y Dennis, John Huddleston, Peter H Sudmant, Karyn Meltz Steinberg, Jill A Rosenfeld, Mattia Miroballo, Tina A Graves, Laura Vives, Maika Malig, Laura Denman, Archana Raja, Andrew Stuart, Joyce Tang, Brenton Munson, Lisa G Shaffer, Chris T Amemiya, Richard K Wilson & Evan E Eichler
  • Somatic mutations of SUZ12 in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    Ming Zhang
    11 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics. doi:10.1038/ng.3116 Authors: Ming Zhang, Yuxuan Wang, Sian Jones, Mark Sausen, Kevin McMahon, Rajni Sharma, Qing Wang, Allan J Belzberg, Kaisorn Chaichana, Gary L Gallia, Ziya L Gokaslan, Greg J Riggins, Jean-Paul Wolinksy, Laura D Wood, Elizabeth A Montgomery, Ralph H Hruban, Kenneth W Kinzler, Nickolas Papadopoulos, Bert Vogelstein & Chetan Bettegowda Neurofibromatosis 1 is a hereditary syndrome characterized by the development of numerous benign neurofibromas, a small subset of which progress to malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). To better understand…
  • Genomic analyses provide insights into the history of tomato breeding

    Tao Lin
    11 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics. doi:10.1038/ng.3117 Authors: Tao Lin, Guangtao Zhu, Junhong Zhang, Xiangyang Xu, Qinghui Yu, Zheng Zheng, Zhonghua Zhang, Yaoyao Lun, Shuai Li, Xiaoxuan Wang, Zejun Huang, Junming Li, Chunzhi Zhang, Taotao Wang, Yuyang Zhang, Aoxue Wang, Yancong Zhang, Kui Lin, Chuanyou Li, Guosheng Xiong, Yongbiao Xue, Andrea Mazzucato, Mathilde Causse, Zhangjun Fei, James J Giovannoni, Roger T Chetelat, Dani Zamir, Thomas Städler, Jingfu Li, Zhibiao Ye, Yongchen Du & Sanwen Huang
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    Nature Geoscience - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Steps for success of OCO-2

    John B. Miller
    28 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience 7, 691 (2014). doi:10.1038/ngeo2255 Authors: John B. Miller, Pieter P. Tans & Manuel Gloor
  • Biological impact on Greenland's albedo

    Liane G. Benning
    28 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience 7, 691 (2014). doi:10.1038/ngeo2260 Authors: Liane G. Benning, Alexandre M. Anesio, Stefanie Lutz & Martyn Tranter
  • Coastal processes: Storm-proofing with marshes

    Sergio Fagherazzi
    28 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience 7, 701 (2014). doi:10.1038/ngeo2262 Author: Sergio Fagherazzi Shorelines are vulnerable to the destructive waves and water levels of increasingly frequent extreme storm events. Wave tank experiments demonstrate that salt marsh vegetation dissipates wave energy and withstands extreme storm conditions.
  • Wave attenuation over coastal salt marshes under storm surge conditions

    Iris Möller
    28 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience 7, 727 (2014). doi:10.1038/ngeo2251 Authors: Iris Möller, Matthias Kudella, Franziska Rupprecht, Tom Spencer, Maike Paul, Bregje K. van Wesenbeeck, Guido Wolters, Kai Jensen, Tjeerd J. Bouma, Martin Miranda-Lange & Stefan Schimmels Coastal communities around the world face an increasing risk from flooding as a result of rising sea level, increasing storminess and land subsidence. Salt marshes can act as natural buffer zones, providing protection from waves during storms. However, the effectiveness of marshes in protecting the coastline during extreme events when…
  • Biogeochemistry: Microbial flexibility

    Alicia Newton
    28 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience 7, 696 (2014). doi:10.1038/ngeo2265 Author: Alicia Newton
 
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  • Plateau uplift in western Canada caused by lithospheric delamination along a craton edge

    Xuewei Bao
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2270 Authors: Xuewei Bao, David W. Eaton & Bernard Guest Continental plateaux, such as the Tibetan Plateau in Asia and the Altiplano–Puna Plateau in South America, are thought to form partly because upwelling, hot asthenospheric mantle replaces some of the denser, lower lithosphere, making the region more buoyant. The spatial and temporal scales of this process are debated, with proposed mechanisms ranging from delamination of fragments to that of the entire lithosphere. The Canadian Cordillera is an exhumed ancient plateau that abuts the North…
  • A multi-sill magma plumbing system beneath the axis of the East Pacific Rise

    Milena Marjanović
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2272 Authors: Milena Marjanović, Suzanne M. Carbotte, Helene Carton, Mladen R. Nedimović, John C. Mutter & Juan Pablo Canales Upper oceanic crust at fast- to intermediate-spreading mid-ocean ridges is thought to form from the intrusion and eruption of magma accumulated within a mid-crustal reservoir present beneath the ridge axis. However, the mechanisms for formation of the lower crust are debated. Observations from pieces of ancient oceanic crust exposed on land — ophiolites — imply that multiple small magma lenses exist…
  • Nitrogen speciation in upper mantle fluids and the origin of Earth's nitrogen-rich atmosphere

    Sami Mikhail
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2271 Authors: Sami Mikhail & Dimitri A. Sverjensky Volatile elements stored in the mantles of terrestrial planets escape through volcanic degassing, and thereby influence planetary atmospheric evolution and habitability. Compared with the atmospheres of Venus and Mars, Earth's atmosphere is nitrogen-rich relative to primordial noble gas concentrations. The compatibility of volatile elements in mantle minerals versus melts and fluids controls how readily these elements are degassed. However, the speciation of nitrogen in mantle fluids is not well…
  • Evidence for basaltic volcanism on the Moon within the past 100 million years

    S. E. Braden
    11 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2252 Authors: S. E. Braden, J. D. Stopar, M. S. Robinson, S. J. Lawrence, C. H. van der Bogert & H. Hiesinger The bulk of basaltic magmatism on the Moon occurred from 3.9 to 3.1 billion years ago on the ancient lunar mare plains. There is evidence for basaltic volcanism as recently as 2.9 billion years ago from crystallization ages and a billion years ago from stratigraphy. An enigmatic surface formation named Ina (18.65° N, 5.30° E) may represent much younger mare volcanism, but age estimates are poorly constrained. Here we investigate 70…
  • Subtropical iceberg scours and meltwater routing in the deglacial western North Atlantic

    Jenna C. Hill
    11 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2267 Authors: Jenna C. Hill & Alan Condron Abrupt centennial-to-millennial shifts in Northern Hemisphere climate during the last deglaciation are thought to have been triggered by the discharge of large volumes of meltwater and icebergs to the subpolar North Atlantic. Here we show that meltwater and icebergs were also transported directly from the Laurentide ice margin to the subtropical North Atlantic in a narrow coastal current. We present high-resolution bathymetric data from south of Cape Hatteras showing numerous scours that we interpret as relict…
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    Nature Immunology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Tetherin signaling

    Laurie A Dempsey
    19 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Immunology 15, 1008 (2014). doi:10.1038/ni.3018 Author: Laurie A Dempsey
  • Time to cast a larger net

    Matthew L Wheeler
    19 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Immunology 15, 1000 (2014). doi:10.1038/ni.3013 Authors: Matthew L Wheeler & David M Underhill Neutrophils sense the size of microbial targets and respond via 'NETosis' when targets are too big to internalize and contain via phagocytosis.
  • Street smarts of science for students

    Michael M Chen
    19 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Immunology 15, 997 (2014). doi:10.1038/ni.2989 Authors: Michael M Chen, Anita Zahs, Sulie L Chang & Elizabeth J Kovacs A workshop organized by the Society for Leukocyte Biology offers advice to graduate students on how to navigate educational and professional waters to find success in academia.
  • TCR signaling fuels Treg cell suppressor function

    Jinfang Zhu
    19 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Immunology 15, 1002 (2014). doi:10.1038/ni.3014 Authors: Jinfang Zhu & Ethan M Shevach Acute ablation of T cell antigen receptors (TCRs) in regulatory T cells (Treg cells) impairs the suppressive activity of these cells, even though they retain expression of Foxp3 and CD25. TCR signaling imparts a critical role in the suppressive function of Treg cells.
  • Isoketals drive hypertension

    Zoltan Fehervari
    19 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Immunology 15, 1008 (2014). doi:10.1038/ni.3020 Author: Zoltan Fehervari
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    Nature Materials - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • Self-similar mesostructure evolution of the growing mollusc shell reminiscent of thermodynamically driven grain growth

    Bernd Bayerlein
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4110 Authors: Bernd Bayerlein, Paul Zaslansky, Yannicke Dauphin, Alexander Rack, Peter Fratzl & Igor Zlotnikov Significant progress has been made in understanding the interaction between mineral precursors and organic components leading to material formation and structuring in biomineralizing systems. The mesostructure of biological materials, such as the outer calcitic shell of molluscs, is characterized by many parameters and the question arises as to what extent they all are, or need to be, controlled biologically. Here, we analyse the…
  • Re-entrant solidification in polymer–colloid mixtures as a consequence of competing entropic and enthalpic attractions

    Lang Feng
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4109 Authors: Lang Feng, Bezia Laderman, Stefano Sacanna & Paul Chaikin In polymer–colloid mixtures, non-adsorbing polymers dispersed with much larger colloids provide a universal yet specific entropic attraction between the colloids. Such so-called depletion interaction arises from an osmotic-pressure imbalance caused by the polymers and is considered to be independent of temperature. Here we show that, for the most commonly used polymer–colloid depletion systems, the polymer undergoes a crossover from non-adsorbing to adsorbing and that,…
  • Liquid-like pseudoelasticity of sub-10-nm crystalline silver particles

    Jun Sun
    11 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4105 Authors: Jun Sun, Longbing He, Yu-Chieh Lo, Tao Xu, Hengchang Bi, Litao Sun, Ze Zhang, Scott X. Mao & Ju Li In nanotechnology, small-volume metals with large surface area are used as electrodes, catalysts, interconnects and antennae. Their shape stability at room temperature has, however, been questioned. Using in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we find that Ag nanoparticles can be deformed like a liquid droplet but remain highly crystalline in the interior, with no sign of dislocation activity during deformation.
  • Giant spin splitting of the two-dimensional electron gas at the surface of SrTiO3

    A. F. Santander-Syro
    11 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4107 Authors: A. F. Santander-Syro, F. Fortuna, C. Bareille, T. C. Rödel, G. Landolt, N. C. Plumb, J. H. Dil & M. Radović Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) forming at the interfaces of transition metal oxides exhibit a range of properties, including tunable insulator–superconductor–metal transitions, large magnetoresistance, coexisting ferromagnetism and superconductivity, and a spin splitting of a few meV (refs , ). Strontium titanate (SrTiO3), the cornerstone of such oxide-based electronics, is a transparent, non-magnetic, wide-bandgap…
  • Oligopeptide complex for targeted non-viral gene delivery to adipocytes

    Young-Wook Won
    4 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4092 Authors: Young-Wook Won, Partho Protim Adhikary, Kwang Suk Lim, Hyung Jin Kim, Jang Kyoung Kim & Yong-Hee Kim
 
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    Nature Medicine - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • Autosomal dominant immune dysregulation syndrome in humans with CTLA4 mutations

    Desirée Schubert
    19 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Medicine. doi:10.1038/nm.3746 Authors: Desirée Schubert, Claudia Bode, Rupert Kenefeck, Tie Zheng Hou, James B Wing, Alan Kennedy, Alla Bulashevska, Britt-Sabina Petersen, Alejandro A Schäffer, Björn A Grüning, Susanne Unger, Natalie Frede, Ulrich Baumann, Torsten Witte, Reinhold E Schmidt, Gregor Dueckers, Tim Niehues, Suranjith Seneviratne, Maria Kanariou, Carsten Speckmann, Stephan Ehl, Anne Rensing-Ehl, Klaus Warnatz, Mirzokhid Rakhmanov, Robert Thimme, Peter Hasselblatt, Florian Emmerich, Toni Cathomen, Rolf Backofen, Paul Fisch, Maximilian Seidl, Annette May,…
  • Cleavage of tau by asparagine endopeptidase mediates the neurofibrillary pathology in Alzheimer's disease

    Zhentao Zhang
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Medicine. doi:10.1038/nm.3700 Authors: Zhentao Zhang, Mingke Song, Xia Liu, Seong Su Kang, Il-Sun Kwon, Duc M Duong, Nicholas T Seyfried, William T Hu, Zhixue Liu, Jian-Zhi Wang, Liming Cheng, Yi E Sun, Shan Ping Yu, Allan I Levey & Keqiang Ye
  • Megakaryocytes regulate hematopoietic stem cell quiescence through CXCL4 secretion

    Ingmar Bruns
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Medicine. doi:10.1038/nm.3707 Authors: Ingmar Bruns, Daniel Lucas, Sandra Pinho, Jalal Ahmed, Michele P Lambert, Yuya Kunisaki, Christoph Scheiermann, Lauren Schiff, Mortimer Poncz, Aviv Bergman & Paul S Frenette In the bone marrow, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) lodge in specialized microenvironments that tightly control the proliferative state of HSCs to adapt to the varying needs for replenishment of blood cells while also preventing HSC exhaustion. All putative niche cells suggested thus far have a nonhematopoietic origin. Thus, it remains unclear how feedback from mature…
  • Regulatory B cells are induced by gut microbiota–driven interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 production

    Elizabeth C Rosser
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Medicine. doi:10.1038/nm.3680 Authors: Elizabeth C Rosser, Kristine Oleinika, Silvia Tonon, Ronan Doyle, Anneleen Bosma, Natalie A Carter, Kathryn A Harris, Simon A Jones, Nigel Klein & Claudia Mauri Regulatory B cells (Breg cells) differentiate in response to inflammation and subsequently restrain excessive immune responses via the release of interleukin-10 (IL-10). However, the precise inflammatory signals governing their differentiation remain to be elucidated. Here we show that the gut microbiota promotes the differentiation of Breg cells in the spleen as well as in the…
  • An in vivo model of human small intestine using pluripotent stem cells

    Carey L Watson
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Medicine. doi:10.1038/nm.3737 Authors: Carey L Watson, Maxime M Mahe, Jorge Múnera, Jonathan C Howell, Nambirajan Sundaram, Holly M Poling, Jamie I Schweitzer, Jefferson E Vallance, Christopher N Mayhew, Ying Sun, Gregory Grabowski, Stacy R Finkbeiner, Jason R Spence, Noah F Shroyer, James M Wells & Michael A Helmrath Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into organ-specific subtypes offers an exciting avenue for the study of embryonic development and disease processes, for pharmacologic studies and as a potential resource for therapeutic transplant. To date,…
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    Nature Methods - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Structural biology: The structural basis of Spinach

    28 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods 11, 992 (2014). doi:10.1038/nmeth.3119
  • The Author File: Paola Picotti

    Vivien Marx
    28 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods 11, 975 (2014). doi:10.1038/nmeth.3116 Author: Vivien Marx Cells brim with activity that a special set of protein assays can help track.
  • Genome engineering: the next genomic revolution

    Charles A Gersbach
    28 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods 11, 1009 (2014). doi:10.1038/nmeth.3113 Author: Charles A Gersbach A decade of advances in genome engineering technologies has enabled the editing of genome sequences much like one edits computer code; many more applications for precisely manipulating genome structure and function are on the horizon.
  • Points of Significance: Nested designs

    Martin Krzywinski
    28 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods 11, 977 (2014). doi:10.1038/nmeth.3137 Authors: Martin Krzywinski, Naomi Altman & Paul Blainey For studies with hierarchical noise sources, use a nested analysis of variance approach.
  • Biophysics: A stir in the cytoplasm

    Irene Kaganman
    28 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods 11, 996 (2014). doi:10.1038/nmeth.3132 Author: Irene Kaganman A combination of techniques reveals that aggregate forces from all enzymes active in the cytoplasm result in randomly fluctuating forces throughout the cell.
 
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    Nature Methods - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • A DNA-based molecular probe for optically reporting cellular traction forces

    Brandon L Blakely
    11 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3145 Authors: Brandon L Blakely, Christoph E Dumelin, Britta Trappmann, Lynn M McGregor, Colin K Choi, Peter C Anthony, Van K Duesterberg, Brendon M Baker, Steven M Block, David R Liu & Christopher S Chen We developed molecular tension probes (TPs) that report traction forces of adherent cells with high spatial resolution, can in principle be linked to virtually any surface, and obviate monitoring deformations of elastic substrates. TPs consist of DNA hairpins conjugated to fluorophore-quencher pairs that unfold and fluoresce when subjected to specific…
  • An improved surface passivation method for single-molecule studies

    Boyang Hua
    11 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3143 Authors: Boyang Hua, Kyu Young Han, Ruobo Zhou, Hajin Kim, Xinghua Shi, Sanjaya C Abeysirigunawardena, Ankur Jain, Digvijay Singh, Vasudha Aggarwal, Sarah A Woodson & Taekjip Ha We report a surface passivation method based on dichlorodimethylsilane (DDS)–Tween-20 for in vitro single-molecule studies, which, under the conditions tested here, more efficiently prevented nonspecific binding of biomolecules than the standard poly(ethylene glycol) surface. The DDS–Tween-20 surface was simple and inexpensive to prepare and did not perturb the…
  • A general design strategy for protein-responsive riboswitches in mammalian cells

    Simon Ausländer
    4 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3136 Authors: Simon Ausländer, Pascal Stücheli, Charlotte Rehm, David Ausländer, Jörg S Hartig & Martin Fussenegger
  • Time-resolved crystallography using the Hadamard transform

    Briony A Yorke
    4 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3139 Authors: Briony A Yorke, Godfrey S Beddard, Robin L Owen & Arwen R Pearson We describe a method for performing time-resolved X-ray crystallographic experiments based on the Hadamard transform, in which time resolution is defined by the underlying periodicity of the probe pulse sequence, and signal/noise is greatly improved over that for the fastest pump-probe experiments depending on a single pulse. This approach should be applicable on standard synchrotron beamlines and will enable high-resolution measurements of protein and small-molecule…
  • Intracellular autofluorescence: a biomarker for epithelial cancer stem cells

    Irene Miranda-Lorenzo
    27 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3112 Authors: Irene Miranda-Lorenzo, Jorge Dorado, Enza Lonardo, Sonia Alcala, Alicia G Serrano, Jenifer Clausell-Tormos, Michele Cioffi, Diego Megias, Sladjana Zagorac, Anamaria Balic, Manuel Hidalgo, Mert Erkan, Joerg Kleeff, Aldo Scarpa, Bruno Sainz & Christopher Heeschen
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    Nature Nanotechnology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Bacterial nanowires: An extended membrane

    Ai Lin Chun
    5 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 9, 750 (2014). doi:10.1038/nnano.2014.230 Author: Ai Lin Chun
  • Graphene devices for life

    Kostas Kostarelos
    5 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 9, 744 (2014). doi:10.1038/nnano.2014.224 Authors: Kostas Kostarelos & Kostya S. Novoselov Kostas Kostarelos and Kostya S. Novoselov examine the potential of graphene in biomedical applications.
  • The global growth of graphene

    Wencai Ren
    5 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 9, 726 (2014). doi:10.1038/nnano.2014.229 Authors: Wencai Ren & Hui-Ming Cheng The large-scale production of graphene aimed at industrial applications has grown significantly in the past few years, especially since many companies in China have entered the market.
  • Graphene against corrosion

    Siva Böhm
    5 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 9, 741 (2014). doi:10.1038/nnano.2014.220 Author: Siva Böhm Siva Böhm discusses how graphene can be used to prevent corrosion of metals such as steel.
  • Challenges and opportunities in graphene commercialization

    Amaia Zurutuza
    5 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 9, 730 (2014). doi:10.1038/nnano.2014.225 Authors: Amaia Zurutuza & Claudio Marinelli As technical knowledge, manufacturing methods and the development of applications mature, key factors will affect the pace of commercialization of graphene.
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    Nature Neuroscience - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Motivational activation: a unifying hypothesis of orexin/hypocretin function

    Stephen V Mahler
    24 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 17, 1298 (2014). doi:10.1038/nn.3810 Authors: Stephen V Mahler, David E Moorman, Rachel J Smith, Morgan H James & Gary Aston-Jones
  • Practice makes perfect

    Aniruddha Das
    24 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 17, 1295 (2014). doi:10.1038/nn.3817 Author: Aniruddha Das As we learn through visual experience, where does that memory form? A study now shows that neural responses at even the earliest stage of visual cortex get reshaped in a way that faithfully reflects ongoing learning.
  • A touching tale: point sensor or pattern detector?

    David T Blake
    24 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 17, 1290 (2014). doi:10.1038/nn.3820 Author: David T Blake The tactile sensors in our fingers have variable sensitivity across the skin. Does this variability harm or help the CNS in touch perception? Work now shows that this variability may provide the CNS with more information about micropositioning and stimulus orientation.
  • Axons hooked to Schwann cell metabolism

    Iva D Tzvetanova
    24 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 17, 1293 (2014). doi:10.1038/nn.3825 Authors: Iva D Tzvetanova & Klaus-Armin Nave Long axonal projections seem to be metabolically coupled to ensheathing glial cells. Targeting LKB1, a regulator of energy homeostasis, specifically in Schwann cells causes a loss of predominantly small unmyelinated fibers.
  • Promoting FOS to an enhanced position

    Sietse Jonkman
    24 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 17, 1291 (2014). doi:10.1038/nn.3819 Authors: Sietse Jonkman & Paul J Kenny How do enhancers facilitate transcription of plasticity-related genes in response to synaptic stimulation? A study implicates a specific histone modification and suggests that FOS regulates enhancer function.
 
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    Nature Photonics - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • A long-range polarization-controlled optical tractor beam

    Vladlen Shvedov
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Photonics. doi:10.1038/nphoton.2014.242 Authors: Vladlen Shvedov, Arthur R. Davoyan, Cyril Hnatovsky, Nader Engheta & Wieslaw Krolikowski The laser beam has become an indispensable tool for the controllable manipulation and transport of microscopic objects in biology, physical chemistry and condensed matter physics. In particular, ‘tractor’ laser beams can draw matter towards a laser source and perform, for instance, all-optical remote sampling. Recent advances in lightwave technology have already led to small-scale experimental demonstrations of tractor beams. However, the…
  • Probing the mechanisms of large Purcell enhancement in plasmonic nanoantennas

    Gleb M. Akselrod
    11 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Photonics. doi:10.1038/nphoton.2014.228 Authors: Gleb M. Akselrod, Christos Argyropoulos, Thang B. Hoang, Cristian Ciracì, Chao Fang, Jiani Huang, David R. Smith & Maiken H. Mikkelsen To move nanophotonic devices such as lasers and single-photon sources into the practical realm, a challenging list of requirements must be met, including directional emission, room-temperature and broadband operation, high radiative quantum efficiency and a large spontaneous emission rate. To achieve these features simultaneously, a platform is needed for which the various decay channels of embedded…
  • Ultrafast multi-terahertz nano-spectroscopy with sub-cycle temporal resolution

    M. Eisele
    4 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Photonics. doi:10.1038/nphoton.2014.225 Authors: M. Eisele, T. L. Cocker, M. A. Huber, M. Plankl, L. Viti, D. Ercolani, L. Sorba, M. S. Vitiello & R. Huber Phase-locked ultrashort pulses in the rich terahertz spectral range have provided key insights into phenomena as diverse as quantum confinement, first-order phase transitions, high-temperature superconductivity and carrier transport in nanomaterials. Ultrabroadband electro-optic sampling of few-cycle field transients can even reveal novel dynamics that occur faster than a single oscillation cycle of light. However, conventional…
  • All-optical coherent control of vacuum Rabi oscillations

    Ranojoy Bose
    4 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Photonics. doi:10.1038/nphoton.2014.224 Authors: Ranojoy Bose, Tao Cai, Kaushik Roy Choudhury, Glenn S. Solomon & Edo Waks
  • Access to long-term optical memories using photon echoes retrieved from semiconductor spins

    L. Langer
    27 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Photonics. doi:10.1038/nphoton.2014.219 Authors: L. Langer, S. V. Poltavtsev, I. A. Yugova, M. Salewski, D. R. Yakovlev, G. Karczewski, T. Wojtowicz, I. A. Akimov & M. Bayer
 
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    Nature Physics - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Shine a light

    Andrea Taroni
    29 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics 10, 704 (2014). doi:10.1038/nphys3126 Author: Andrea Taroni
  • Together we stand

    Ioannis Pavlidis
    29 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics 10, 700 (2014). doi:10.1038/nphys3110 Authors: Ioannis Pavlidis, Alexander M. Petersen & Ioanna Semendeferi University culture stands at a critical crossroads: the era of team science is upon us functionally, but not yet structurally. Solutions to the problems this mismatch creates involve rethinking education — and giving credit where credit is due.
  • Two-star show

    Abigail Klopper
    29 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics 10, 704 (2014). doi:10.1038/nphys3124 Author: Abigail Klopper
  • Clear as a Bell

    Mark Buchanan
    29 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics 10, 703 (2014). doi:10.1038/nphys3118 Author: Mark Buchanan
  • Drive for a spin

    Luke Fleet
    29 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics 10, 704 (2014). doi:10.1038/nphys3123 Author: Luke Fleet
 
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    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Merck wins first PD1 sprint in US

    30 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 13, 715 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrd4458 US regulators approved Merck & Co.'s breakthrough cancer immunotherapy pembrolizumab, just over 3 years after it entered the clinic.The lowdown: After a brief but bright surge through the clinic, the first of the much hyped and hoped-for programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1)
  • Momentum builds around new antibiotic business models

    Asher Mullard
    30 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 13, 711 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrd4455 Author: Asher Mullard The Innovative Medicines Initiative's DRIVE-AB project joins the fray of task forces working to reinvigorate interest in antibiotics by developing reimbursement models that delink revenue from sales volume.
  • Reanalyse this

    30 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 13, 715 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrd4460 Re-evaluations of clinical trial results are rare, but they often point to new conclusions.The lowdown: With industry and academic institutions continuing to negotiate the terms of increased clinical trial result transparency, John Ioannidis of Stanford University and his colleagues scoured the literature to
  • False dawn for cystic fibrosis disease modifiers?

    David Holmes
    30 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 13, 713 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrd4456 Author: David Holmes Recent results have cast doubt over how effective a breakthrough class of cystic fibrosis drugs can be in patients with the most common form of the disease.
  • Illuminating interleukin-5 data

    30 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 13, 715 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrd4459 GlaxoSmithKline's mepolizumab succeeded in two Phase III asthma trials, whereas AstraZeneca's benralizumab failed in a Phase II chronic obstructive pulmonary disease trial.The lowdown: In 2000, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) hit a wall when its interleukin-5 (IL-5)-specific antibody mepolizumab failed in its first Phase II trial.
 
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    Nature Reviews Genetics - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Alternative splicing: Characterizing cell fate

    Isabel Lokody
    16 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 15, 706 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrg3847 Author: Isabel Lokody Chen et al. have identified and catalogued genes, transcripts and alternative splicing events that are specific to various human haematopoietic cell fates, providing insights into the transcriptional changes involved in the various haematopoeitic precursor populations.The authors used RNA sequencing to identify cell fate-specific
  • Alternative splicing: Retaining introns to sculpt gene expression

    Darren J. Burgess
    16 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 15, 707 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrg3844 Author: Darren J. Burgess Intron retention is a common form of alternative splicing in plants and unicellular eukaryotes; however, its prevalence in mammals was unclear. Braunschweig et al. carried out high-throughput RNA sequencing from ∼40 human and mouse cell types and found evidence for intron retention in transcripts
  • Cancer: Up and down for DNA methylation inhibitors

    Darren J. Burgess
    16 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 15, 707 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrg3845 Author: Darren J. Burgess Tumour suppressor genes in cancer cells are frequently silenced by promoter CpG methylation, which has led to the pursuit of DNA methylation inhibitors as potential cancer therapeutics to reactivate these genes. However, DNA methylation in gene bodies is associated with the opposite effect (that is,
  • Epigenetics: H3K27 methylation in transgenerational epigenetic memory

    Darren J. Burgess
    16 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 15, 703 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrg3848 Author: Darren J. Burgess During reproduction, organisms must pass on genomes with suitable epigenetic states to the next generation. These states must be appropriate for gene expression programmes in the progeny and can be 'reset' to prevent the unwanted transgenerational inheritance of environmentally induced epigenetic states. Identifying the key
  • RNA: Dissecting circular RNA biogenesis

    Darren J. Burgess
    16 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 15, 707 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrg3846 Author: Darren J. Burgess Circular RNAs are thought to arise from non-canonical splicing of linear pre-mRNAs, as they frequently harbour the 3′ end of one exon joined to an upstream (rather than downstream) 5′ end of an exon. Zhang et al. used bioinformatic analyses on human transcriptome data
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    Nature Reviews Immunology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Regulatory T cells: Expanding TReg cell numbers in vivo

    Olive Leavy
    24 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 14, 648 (2014). doi:10.1038/nri3751 Author: Olive Leavy There is great interest in harnessing the suppressive powers of regulatory T (TReg) cells in the clinic. Although it is possible to numerically expand TReg cells ex vivo, concerns over their purity and stability remain. An alternative approach is to
  • Immunogenetics: Human CTLA4 mutations described

    Olive Leavy
    24 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 14, 648 (2014). doi:10.1038/nri3752 Author: Olive Leavy Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA4) is a crucial negative regulator of T cells. A new study describes for the first time the consequences of CTLA4 mutations in humans. Six subjects from four unrelated families suffering from severe immune dysregulation were identified as having
  • Macrophages: Gut needs a steady supply of reinforcements

    Yvonne Bordon
    24 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 14, 648 (2014). doi:10.1038/nri3753 Author: Yvonne Bordon Recent studies have suggested that macrophages in steady-state tissues originate from embryonic yolk sac-derived progenitors and are maintained by self-renewal in situ. Bain et al. now report that this paradigm does not hold true for intestinal macrophages. They have found that embryonic precursor
  • T cell memory: Warning — here comes a pathogen!

    Elisabeth Kugelberg
    24 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 14, 647 (2014). doi:10.1038/nri3750 Author: Elisabeth Kugelberg Activation of tissue-resident memory CD8+ T cells leads to a state of pathogen alert that induces both innate and adaptive immune responses.
  • Natural killer T cells: Lyme scaled back

    Yvonne Bordon
    18 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 14, 648 (2014). doi:10.1038/nri3748 Author: Yvonne Bordon Invariant natural killer T cells can directly limit bacterial dissemination into the joints.
 
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    Nature Reviews Microbiology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Viral infection: Host and viral components of the influenza virion

    Andrea Du Toit
    15 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 12, 724 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3376 Author: Andrea Du Toit Influenza viruses produce pleomorphic virions, which has made it difficult to study their composition. Hutchinson et al. used a mass spectrometry approach to determine and quantify the protein composition of influenza virions. They show that the core architecture of virions is conserved despite variation
  • Bacterial pathogenesis: A pneumococcal heart-breaker

    Andrea Du Toit
    15 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 12, 724 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3374 Author: Andrea Du Toit Invasive pneumococcal disease is often associated with an increased incidence of adverse cardiac events. A new study now shows that Streptococcus pneumoniae, the main cause of community-acquired pneumonia, causes direct cardiotoxicity and induces the formation of microscopic lesions within the myocardium of experimentally infected
  • Bacterial genetics: Chromosomal position regulates gene expression

    Andrea Du Toit
    15 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 12, 724 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3375 Author: Andrea Du Toit The effect of chromosomal location on the expression of bacterial genes is understudied; here, Bryant et al. re-address how chromosomal position affects gene expression in Escherichia coli K-12. By inserting a reporter cassette composed of GFP under the control of the lac
  • Microbiome: Bacteria and the brain

    Christina Tobin Kåhrström
    15 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 12, 725 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3373 Author: Christina Tobin Kåhrström Accumulating evidence suggests that the gut microbiota influences host neurological activity and behaviour. Here, the authors find that the two gut Firmicutes, Clostridium sporogenes and Ruminococcus gnavus, produce and secrete two distinct tryptophan decarboxylases that catalyse the formation of the neurotransmitter tryptamine. Tryptamine
  • Marine microbiology: Exploring the unexplored

    Christina Tobin Kåhrström
    15 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 12, 725 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3371 Author: Christina Tobin Kåhrström Marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are hot spots for microbial-driven matter and energy transformations, but the dynamics of virus–host interactions at these sites are poorly understood. In this study, Roux et al. used a combination of metagenomics and single-cell amplified genome (SAG) sequencing to
 
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    Nature Reviews Neuroscience - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Perception: A decisive response

    Darran Yates
    19 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 701 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrn3853 Author: Darran Yates Certain neurons in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) respond to different images and even the name of a given individual. Here, the authors assessed MTL neuron responses in a face adaptation task. Participants were shown the face of one of two well-known people (who were
  • Learning and memory: The left–right divide

    Darran Yates
    19 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 701 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrn3851 Author: Darran Yates Several studies in mice have revealed that there are differences in the molecular make-up of and plasticity at CA3–CA1 pyramidal neuron synapses that depend on whether the presynaptic input comes from the left or right CA3. To detect any functional effects of this asymmetry, Shipton
  • Learning and memory: Actively compensating

    Darran Yates
    19 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 701 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrn3854 Author: Darran Yates Alzheimer's disease is characterized by episodic memory impairments and brain deposition of the peptide amyloid-β (Aβ). However, not all older people with Aβ pathology exhibit memory deficits. Elman et al.examined whether brain hyperactivity, which has been observed in such individuals, might compensate for this
  • Neural circuits: Getting colder

    Darran Yates
    19 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 701 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrn3852 Author: Darran Yates The neural circuitry that underlies the perception of skin cooling is unclear. To examine this, the authors trained mice to report temperature drops (delivered by a thermal probe applied to the forepaw skin) by licking a water dispenser. Cooling induced activity in the primary somatosensory
  • Neurotransmission: Transmission takes two

    Darran Yates
    14 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 700 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrn3848 Author: Darran Yates Two studies in rodents show that lateral habenula activity is regulated by neurons that co-release glutamate and GABA.
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    Nature Reviews Cardiology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Celebrating the first 10 years of Nature Reviews Cardiology

    Gregory B. Lim
    16 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 11, 617 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2014.158 Author: Gregory B. Lim The inaugural issue of Nature Reviews Cardiology was published in November 2004 under the title of Nature Clinical Practice Cardiovascular Medicine. As reviewed in this 10-year anniversary issue, much has changed in cardiology over the past decade and, during this period, Nature Reviews
  • Decade in review—peripheral vascular disease: 10 Years of breakthroughs in peripheral vascular disease

    Mark A. Creager
    29 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 11, 635 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2014.153 Author: Mark A. Creager Clinical trials published during the past decade have had substantial effects on the treatment of peripheral vascular diseases. In this article, I discuss ten important trials that have influenced treatment for common vascular disorders, including peripheral artery disease, abdominal aortic aneurysm, renal artery disease, extracranial carotid artery disease, and venous thromboembolism.
  • Top 10 cardiovascular therapies and interventions for the next decade

    Valentin Fuster
    29 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 11, 671 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2014.137 Author: Valentin Fuster Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has become the most-common cause of death worldwide. The Western lifestyle does not promote healthy living, and the consequences are most devastating when social inequalities are combined with economic factors and population growth. The expansion of poor nutritional habits, obesity, and associated
  • Ethnicity and sympathetic tone: predictors of the blood pressure response to renal denervation?

    Yutang Wang
    29 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 11, 638 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2014.70-c1 Author: Yutang Wang I read with great interest the News & Views article by Schmieder (How should data from SYMPLICITY HTN-3 be interpreted? Nat. Rev. Cardiol.11, 375–376; 2014). Schmieder provided an excellent overview of the randomized, sham-controlled, single-blinded SYMPLICITY HTN-3 trial, and provided
  • Renal denervation—a valid treatment option despite SYMPLICITY HTN-3

    Roland E. Schmieder
    29 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 11, 638 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2014.70-c2 Author: Roland E. Schmieder I thank Yutang Wang for his Correspondence (Ethnicity and sympathetic tone: predictors of the blood pressure response to renal denervation? Nat. Rev. Cardiol. doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2014.70-c1) on my News & Views article (How should data from SYMPLICITY HTN-3 be interpreted? Nat. Rev. Cardiol.11
 
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    Nature Reviews Endocrinology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Epidemiology: Obesity and cancer—the evidence is fattening up

    Rudolf Kaaks
    29 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Endocrinology 10, 644 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrendo.2014.168 Authors: Rudolf Kaaks & Tilman Kühn A large-scale study with 5.24 million participants has found statistically significant associations between increased BMI and 17 of 22 frequent cancers. The strongest associations were observed for cancers of the endometrium, kidney, gallbladder and uterus. Questions remain as to whether several of the weaker associations reported in this study reflect genuinely causal relationships.
  • Genetic regulation of mammalian gonad development

    Stefanie Eggers
    22 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Endocrinology 10, 673 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrendo.2014.163 Authors: Stefanie Eggers, Thomas Ohnesorg & Andrew Sinclair Sex-specific gonadal development starts with formation of the bipotential gonad, which then differentiates into either a mature testis or an ovary. This process is dependent on activation of either the testis-specific or the ovary-specific pathway while the opposite pathway is continuously repressed. A network of
  • Gut microbiota: Not so sweet—artificial sweeteners can cause glucose intolerance by affecting the gut microbiota

    Claire Greenhill
    22 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Endocrinology 10, 637 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrendo.2014.167 Author: Claire Greenhill Noncaloric artificial sweeteners (NAS) have been linked with glucose intolerance in a new study published in Nature. Furthermore, the researchers have demonstrated that the metabolic changes underlying glucose intolerance are the result of consumed NAS altering the composition of the gut microbiota.The incidence
  • Nutrition: High-fat diet and dysbiosis accelerate tumorigenesis in mice

    Claire Greenhill
    15 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Endocrinology 10, 638 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrendo.2014.164 Author: Claire Greenhill In mice with a predisposition to develop intestinal cancer, dysbiosis as a result of a high-fat diet accelerates the development of intestinal tumours, reports a new study in Nature.“We were interested to see if the caloric input or constituents of a diet could
  • Mitochondrial dynamics in the central regulation of metabolism

    Carole M. Nasrallah
    8 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Endocrinology 10, 650 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrendo.2014.160 Authors: Carole M. Nasrallah & Tamas L. Horvath The ability of an organism to convert organic molecules from the environment into energy is essential for the development of cellular structures, cell differentiation and growth. Mitochondria have a fundamental role in regulating metabolic pathways, and tight control of mitochondrial functions and dynamics is critical
 
 
 
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    Naturejobs - Search results

  • Locum Assistant Editor, Nature Genetics

    21 Oct 2014 | 11:39 am
    Nature Genetics (http://www.nature.com/ng) seeks a Locum Assistant Editor to join the editorial team based in New York for a six to twelve month period from January 1st, 2015. This position, based in Nature Publishing Group's New York office, involves working closely with the Chief Editor and other members of the journal team on all aspects of the editorial process, including manuscript evaluation, commissioning and editing reviews, organizing peer-review, writing for the journal, and develop…
  • Gastroenterologist

    21 Oct 2014 | 11:07 am
    Digestive Healthcare Center, a premier gastroenterology six physician practice offering comprehensive services located in Hillsborough, NJ, seeks a board certified/board eligible gastroenterologist. EUS, ERCP and Hepatology fellowship training is desired. Practice offers a competitive base salary, production incentives, a full and comprehensive benefits package, potential for ASC ownership, and partnership opportunity. Please contact Raymond Berrios at rayberrios@gmail.com
  • Tenure Track Faculty Position

    21 Oct 2014 | 9:24 am
    Faculty Position, University of California, San Francisco: Enabling Technologies for Biological Discovery The Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry at UCSF seeks candidates for a tenure track faculty position, preferably at the rank of Assistant Professor. We seek outstanding individuals to develop and apply enabling technologies to biological discovery. Some examples include genome editing, cellular engineering, mass spectrometry or new physical methods that could be applied to any field…
  • Assistant/Associate Professor in the Area of Synthetic Biology

    21 Oct 2014 | 9:23 am
    The Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, https://bmb.natsci.msu.edu/ invites applications for a tenure-system faculty position at the Assistant or Associate Professor level in the area of Synthetic Biology. We are particularly interested in candidates whose research encompasses the development of novel tools, parts, devices, and/or chassis and who apply synthetic biology to questions related but not limited to the production of fuels or high-value chemicals, or to the development of b…
  • Scientist-Ocular Disease

    21 Oct 2014 | 8:54 am
    Passionate About Science We’re passionate and rigorous about our science. For more than 30 years, Genentech has been at the forefront of the biotechnology industry, using innovative science to develop breakthrough medicines that improve the lives of people with serious or life-threatening diseases. The following opportunity exists in our South San Francisco, CA headquarters: Scientist – Ocular Disease Responsibilities: The Department of Immunology in Genentech Research …
 
 
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    British Journal of Pharmacology

  • Dopamine receptors: an update – IUPHAR Review 13

    Jean-Martin Beaulieu, Stefano Espinoza, Raul R. Gainetdinov
    17 Oct 2014 | 1:44 am
    Abstract The variety of physiological functions controlled by dopamine in the brain and periphery is mediated by the D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5 dopamine G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Drugs acting on dopamine receptors are significant tools for the management of several neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and Parkinson disease. Recent investigations of dopamine receptor signalling have shown that dopamine receptors, apart from their canonical action on cAMP-mediated signalling, can regulate a myriad of cellular responses to fine-tune the…
  • The TRPM4 inhibitor 9-phenanthrol activates endothelial cell intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in rat isolated mesenteric artery

    C J Garland, S V Smirnov, P Bagher, C S Lim, C Y Huang, R Mitchell, C Stanley, A Pinkney, K A Dora
    17 Oct 2014 | 1:44 am
    Abstract Background and purposeSmooth muscle TRPM4 channels play a fundamental role in the development of the myogenic arterial constriction that is necessary for blood flow autoregulation. As TRPM4 channels are present throughout the vasculature, we investigated their potential role in non-myogenic resistance arteries using the TRPM4 inhibitor 9-phenanthrol. Experimental ApproachPressure and wire myography were used to assess artery reactivity, the latter in combination with measurements of smooth muscle membrane potential. Immunohistochemistry and endothelial cell (EC) calcium changes were…
  • Carbon nanomaterials combined with metal nanoparticles for theranostic applications

    Gloria Modugno, Cécilia Ménard-Moyon, Maurizio Prato, Alberto Bianco
    17 Oct 2014 | 1:43 am
    Abstract Among targeted delivery systems, platforms with nanosize dimensions, such as carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) and metal nanoparticles (NPs), have shown great potential in biomedical applications. They have received considerable interest in recent years, especially with respect to their potential utilization in the field of cancer diagnosis and therapy. The multifunctionalization of nanomaterials provides opportunities to use them as multimodal agents for theranostics, a combination of therapy and diagnosis. Carbon nanotubes and graphene are within the most widely used CNMs because of…
  • Estrogen inhibits BMP4-induced BMP4 expression in cardiomyocytes: a potential mechanism of estrogen-mediated protection against cardiac hypertrophy

    Yu-Chun Wang, Xiao-Lin Xiao, Na Li, Di Yang, Yue Xing, Rong Huo, Ming-Yu Liu, Yan-Qiu Zhang, De-Li Dong
    17 Oct 2014 | 1:43 am
    Abstract Background and PurposeEstrogen inhibits cardiac hypertrophy and bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP4) induces cardiac hypertrophy. The present study was designed to test whether estrogen inhibited BMP4 expression in cardiomyocytes. Experimental ApproachThe cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were used in in vitro experiments. The female mice were performed with bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) operation and the in vivo cardiac hypertrophy was obtained by subjecting the animals to transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Key ResultsEstrogen inhibited BMP4-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and…
  • Indoline-3-propionate and 3-aminopropyl carbamates reduce lung injury and pro-inflammatory cytokines induced in mice by LPS

    E Finkin-Groner, D Moradov, H Shifrin, C Bejar, A Nudelman, M Weinstock
    17 Oct 2014 | 1:42 am
    Abstract Background and PurposeIn the search for safer and effective anti-inflammatory agents, we investigated the effect of methyl indoline-3-propionate and indoline-3-(3-aminopropyl) carbamates on LPS-induced lung injury and pro-inflammatory cytokines in mice. Their mechanism of action was determined in murine peritoneal macrophages. Experimental ApproachLung injury was induced by intra-tracheal infusion of LPS and assessed by the change in lung weight and structure by light microscopy after staining by haematoxylin and eosin. In LPS-activated macrophages MAPK proteins and IκBα were…
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    PSI-Nature Structural Biology Knowledgebase

  • Microbiome: Artificial Sweeteners Induce Unhealthy Metabolism

    Anita M. Engh
    15 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    PSI-Nature Structural Biology Knowledgebase (2014). doi:10.1038/sbkb.2014.228 Author: Anita M. Engh Artificial sweeteners alter metabolism through shifts in the distribution of gut microbiota species.
  • Microbiome: When Form Doesn't Equal Function

    Catherine Goodman
    15 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    PSI-Nature Structural Biology Knowledgebase (2014). doi:10.1038/sbkb.2014.229 Author: Catherine Goodman The characterization of three proteins from the human microbiome extends our understanding of PLP-dependent enzymes.
  • Commensally sourced antibiotics

    Cláudio Nunes-Alves
    21 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology , (2014). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3363 Author: Cláudio Nunes-Alves A study analyzes the distribution of biosynthetic gene clusters in the human microbiome.
  • First aid kit for cholera

    Andrea Du Toit
    28 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology , (2014). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3366 Author: Andrea Du Toit The role of the human gut microbiota in Vibrio cholerae infection is investigated.
  • Microbiome: Expanding the Gut Gene Catalog

    Tal Nawy
    15 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    PSI-Nature Structural Biology Knowledgebase (2014). doi:10.1038/sbkb.2014.230 Author: Tal Nawy An international effort has identified nearly ten million genes belonging to microbes hosted by diverse human guts.
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