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  • Increasing the efficiency of homology-directed repair for CRISPR-Cas9-induced precise gene editing in mammalian cells

    Nature Biotechnology - AOP - nature.com science feeds
    Van Trung Chu
    23 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3198 Authors: Van Trung Chu, Timm Weber, Benedikt Wefers, Wolfgang Wurst, Sandrine Sander, Klaus Rajewsky & Ralf Kühn The insertion of precise genetic modifications by genome editing tools such as CRISPR-Cas9 is limited by the relatively low efficiency of homology-directed repair (HDR) compared with the higher efficiency of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. To enhance HDR, enabling the insertion of precise genetic modifications, we suppressed the NHEJ key molecules KU70, KU80 or DNA ligase IV by gene silencing, the ligase IV inhibitor…
  • Concern raised over payment for fast-track peer review

    NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
    Daniel Cressey
    26 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Scientist resigns from NPG’s Scientific Reports journal over pilot project.Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2015.17204
  • About time

    Nature - Issue - nature.com science feeds
    24 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    About time Nature 519, 7544 (2015). doi:10.1038/519390a The next few years will see NASA missions probe the innermost secrets of gas giants.
  • Loss of δ-catenin function in severe autism

    Nature - AOP - nature.com science feeds
    Tychele N. Turner
    24 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 25 March 2015. doi:10.1038/nature14186 Authors: Tychele N. Turner, Kamal Sharma, Edwin C. Oh, Yangfan P. Liu, Ryan L. Collins, Maria X. Sosa, Dallas R. Auer, Harrison Brand, Stephan J. Sanders, Daniel Moreno-De-Luca, Vasyl Pihur, Teri Plona, Kristen Pike, Daniel R. Soppet, Michael W. Smith, Sau Wai Cheung, Christa Lese Martin, Matthew W. State, Michael E. Talkowski, Edwin Cook, Richard Huganir, Nicholas Katsanis & Aravinda Chakravarti
  • Infested

    Scientific American
    16 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Scientific American 312, 76 (2015). doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0415-76d
 
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    Nature - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • About time

    24 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    About time Nature 519, 7544 (2015). doi:10.1038/519390a The next few years will see NASA missions probe the innermost secrets of gas giants.
  • Applied prestige

    24 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Applied prestige Nature 519, 7544 (2015). doi:10.1038/519389b The UK research assessment should inspire everybody to reward excellent societal impacts.
  • Learning from nature's best

    Julie Gould
    24 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Learning from nature's best Nature. doi:10.1038/519S2a Author: Julie Gould Materials researchers are taking cues from specific plants and animals that make substances that could endow humans with superhero powers.
  • Medical microbiology: Super bacteria lurk in the home

    24 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Medical microbiology: Super bacteria lurk in the home Nature 519, 7544 (2015). doi:10.1038/519393c Drug-resistant bacteria may hide out in homes for many years before causing disease.In the 1990s, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) moved out of hospitals in North America and started circulating in the community, causing skin and other infections. A team led by Michael David
  • Zoology: Fish slurps up prey with watery 'tongue'

    24 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Zoology: Fish slurps up prey with watery 'tongue' Nature 519, 7544 (2015). doi:10.1038/519392a Mudskipper fish (Periophthalmus barbarus; pictured) use water bubbles as a 'tongue' to feed on land. The finding hints at how other animals might have evolved tongues as they made the transition from aquatic to terrestrial life.Krijn Michel at the University of Antwerp
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  • Loss of δ-catenin function in severe autism

    Tychele N. Turner
    24 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 25 March 2015. doi:10.1038/nature14186 Authors: Tychele N. Turner, Kamal Sharma, Edwin C. Oh, Yangfan P. Liu, Ryan L. Collins, Maria X. Sosa, Dallas R. Auer, Harrison Brand, Stephan J. Sanders, Daniel Moreno-De-Luca, Vasyl Pihur, Teri Plona, Kristen Pike, Daniel R. Soppet, Michael W. Smith, Sau Wai Cheung, Christa Lese Martin, Matthew W. State, Michael E. Talkowski, Edwin Cook, Richard Huganir, Nicholas Katsanis & Aravinda Chakravarti
  • The Paf1 complex represses small-RNA-mediated epigenetic gene silencing

    Katarzyna Maria Kowalik
    24 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 25 March 2015. doi:10.1038/nature14337 Authors: Katarzyna Maria Kowalik, Yukiko Shimada, Valentin Flury, Michael Beda Stadler, Julia Batki & Marc Bühler RNA interference (RNAi) refers to the ability of exogenously introduced double-stranded RNA to silence expression of homologous sequences. Silencing is initiated when the enzyme Dicer processes the double-stranded RNA into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Small RNA molecules are incorporated into Argonaute-protein-containing effector complexes, which they guide to complementary targets to mediate…
  • Molecular biology: RNA interference hangs by a thread

    Mikel Zaratiegui
    24 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 25 March 2015. doi:10.1038/nature14376 Author: Mikel Zaratiegui The Paf1 protein complex in fission yeast has been found to protect protein-coding genes from inhibition by RNA-mediated silencing of transcription, by stimulating the release of nascent transcripts from DNA.
  • Saturn’s fast spin determined from its gravitational field and oblateness

    Ravit Helled
    24 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 25 March 2015. doi:10.1038/nature14278 Authors: Ravit Helled, Eli Galanti & Yohai Kaspi The alignment of Saturn’s magnetic pole with its rotation axis precludes the use of magnetic field measurements to determine its rotation period. The period was previously determined from radio measurements by the Voyager spacecraft to be 10 h 39 min 22.4 s (ref. 2). When the Cassini spacecraft measured a period of 10 h 47 min 6 s, which was additionally found to change between sequential measurements, it became clear…
  • Primary transcripts of microRNAs encode regulatory peptides

    Dominique Lauressergues
    24 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 25 March 2015. doi:10.1038/nature14346 Authors: Dominique Lauressergues, Jean-Malo Couzigou, Hélène San Clemente, Yves Martinez, Christophe Dunand, Guillaume Bécard & Jean-Philippe Combier MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory RNA molecules that inhibit the expression of specific target genes by binding to and cleaving their messenger RNAs or otherwise inhibiting their translation into proteins. miRNAs are transcribed as much larger primary transcripts (pri-miRNAs), the function of which is not fully understood. Here we show that plant…
 
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    Scientific American

  • Infested

    16 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Scientific American 312, 76 (2015). doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0415-76d
  • Letters

    16 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Scientific American 312, 6 (2015). doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0415-6
  • Quick Hits

    16 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Scientific American 312, 24 (2015). doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0415-24
  • 50, 100 & 150 Years Ago

    Daniel C. Schlenoff
    16 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Scientific American 312, 82 (2015). doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0415-82 Author: Daniel C. Schlenoff
  • Out-of-This-World Coffee

    Bryan Lufkin
    16 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Scientific American 312, 18 (2015). doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0415-18 Author: Bryan Lufkin The space station gets an espresso maker
 
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    Nature Biotechnology - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • Increasing the efficiency of homology-directed repair for CRISPR-Cas9-induced precise gene editing in mammalian cells

    Van Trung Chu
    23 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3198 Authors: Van Trung Chu, Timm Weber, Benedikt Wefers, Wolfgang Wurst, Sandrine Sander, Klaus Rajewsky & Ralf Kühn The insertion of precise genetic modifications by genome editing tools such as CRISPR-Cas9 is limited by the relatively low efficiency of homology-directed repair (HDR) compared with the higher efficiency of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. To enhance HDR, enabling the insertion of precise genetic modifications, we suppressed the NHEJ key molecules KU70, KU80 or DNA ligase IV by gene silencing, the ligase IV inhibitor…
  • Multiplexed tracking of combinatorial genomic mutations in engineered cell populations

    Ramsey I Zeitoun
    22 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3177 Authors: Ramsey I Zeitoun, Andrew D Garst, George D Degen, Gur Pines, Thomas J Mansell, Tirzah Y Glebes, Nanette R Boyle & Ryan T Gill
  • MutMap accelerates breeding of a salt-tolerant rice cultivar

    Hiroki Takagi
    22 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3188 Authors: Hiroki Takagi, Muluneh Tamiru, Akira Abe, Kentaro Yoshida, Aiko Uemura, Hiroki Yaegashi, Tsutomu Obara, Kaori Oikawa, Hiroe Utsushi, Eiko Kanzaki, Chikako Mitsuoka, Satoshi Natsume, Shunichi Kosugi, Hiroyuki Kanzaki, Hideo Matsumura, Naoya Urasaki, Sophien Kamoun & Ryohei Terauchi
  • Increasing the efficiency of precise genome editing with CRISPR-Cas9 by inhibition of nonhomologous end joining

    Takeshi Maruyama
    22 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3190 Authors: Takeshi Maruyama, Stephanie K Dougan, Matthias C Truttmann, Angelina M Bilate, Jessica R Ingram & Hidde L Ploegh Methods to introduce targeted double-strand breaks (DSBs) into DNA enable precise genome editing by increasing the rate at which externally supplied DNA fragments are incorporated into the genome through homologous recombination. The efficiency of these methods is limited by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), an alternative DNA repair pathway that competes with homology-directed repair (HDR). To promote HDR at the expense of…
  • Clearance of persistent hepatitis C virus infection in humanized mice using a claudin-1-targeting monoclonal antibody

    Laurent Mailly
    22 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3179 Authors: Laurent Mailly, Fei Xiao, Joachim Lupberger, Garrick K Wilson, Philippe Aubert, François H T Duong, Diego Calabrese, Céline Leboeuf, Isabel Fofana, Christine Thumann, Simonetta Bandiera, Marc Lütgehetmann, Tassilo Volz, Christopher Davis, Helen J Harris, Christopher J Mee, Erika Girardi, Béatrice Chane-Woon-Ming, Maria Ericsson, Nicola Fletcher, Ralf Bartenschlager, Patrick Pessaux, Koen Vercauteren, Philip Meuleman, Pascal Villa, Lars Kaderali, Sébastien Pfeffer, Markus H Heim, Michel Neunlist, Mirjam B Zeisel,…
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    Nature Chemical Biology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Leukemia: Free RUNX1

    Grant Miura
    17 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 11, 241 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1784 Author: Grant Miura
  • Translational research: Drug discovery from the inside

    Derek Lowe
    17 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 11, 239 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1778 Author: Derek Lowe
  • Double-blind peer review

    17 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 11, 237 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1785 Nature and the Nature journals start offering anonymity to authors during the peer-review process.
  • Viral mechanisms: Tat modulates DAT

    Mirella Bucci
    17 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 11, 240 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1779 Author: Mirella Bucci
  • Carbohydrates: Translation from sticky to sweet

    Michela G Tonetti
    17 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 11, 243 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1773 Author: Michela G Tonetti Bacterial translation elongation factor P (EF-P) is essential to overcome ribosome stalling at polyproline stretches during protein synthesis. A new mechanism of EF-P activation, identified in a subset of Bacteria, involves addition of the sugar L-rhamnose to a critical arginine residue.
 
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    Nature Chemistry

  • Natural products: Re-examining resveratrol

    Stephen Davey
    23 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry 7, 271 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchem.2230 Author: Stephen Davey
  • Weird world

    Ashutosh S. Jogalekar
    23 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry 7, 267 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchem.2216 Author: Ashutosh S. Jogalekar
  • Protein engineering: The power of four

    Arnold J. Boersma
    23 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry 7, 277 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchem.2220 Authors: Arnold J. Boersma & Gerard Roelfes Supramolecular assembly has been used to design and create new proteins capable of performing biomimetic functions in complex environments such as membranes and inside living cells.
  • Theatre: Rekindling an old flame

    Claire Hansell
    23 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry 7, 268 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchem.2209 Author: Claire Hansell
  • Inorganic materials: The quest for new functionality

    Aron Walsh
    23 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry 7, 274 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchem.2213 Author: Aron Walsh Building on our understanding of the chemical bond, advances in synthetic chemistry, and large-scale computation, materials design has now become a reality. From a pool of 400 unknown compositions, 15 new compounds have been realized that adopt the predicted structures and properties.
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    Nature Chemistry

  • Iterative design of a helically folded aromatic oligoamide sequence for the selective encapsulation of fructose

    Nagula Chandramouli
    15 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2195 Authors: Nagula Chandramouli, Yann Ferrand, Guillaume Lautrette, Brice Kauffmann, Cameron David Mackereth, Michel Laguerre, Didier Dubreuil & Ivan Huc Designing synthetic molecular receptors that can differentiate between specific monosaccharide guests is very challenging. Now, a helically folded oligoamide that selectively encapsulates fructose has been designed using an iterative approach that exploits the modular structure of folded synthetic oligomer sequences, in conjunction with molecular modelling and structural characterization.
  • Common origins of RNA, protein and lipid precursors in a cyanosulfidic protometabolism

    Bhavesh H. Patel
    15 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2202 Authors: Bhavesh H. Patel, Claudia Percivalle, Dougal J. Ritson, Colm D. Duffy & John D. Sutherland A minimal cell — one that has all the minimum requirements for life — is still a complex entity comprising informational, compartment-forming and metabolic subsystems. Here it is shown that, contrary to previous assumptions, a common prebiotically plausible chemistry can give rise to building blocks for all the subsystems.
  • Highly emissive platinum(II) metallacages

    Xuzhou Yan
    15 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2201 Authors: Xuzhou Yan, Timothy R. Cook, Pi Wang, Feihe Huang & Peter J. Stang Two metallacages containing Pt(II) phosphine centres bridged by organic donors are shown to display dynamic emission behaviour across a range of concentrations. At low concentrations, the individual cages emit. At high concentrations, or on introduction of additional solvents, aggregation occurs that manifests in colour-tunable fluorescence and white-light emission in THF.
  • Combined biomass valorization and hydrogen production in a photoelectrochemical cell

    Hyun Gil Cha
    8 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2194 Authors: Hyun Gil Cha & Kyoung-Shin Choi Photoelectrochemical water-splitting produces hydrogen at the cathode and oxygen at the anode. The anode reaction is, however, kinetically unfavourable. Now, reduction of water at the cathode has been combined with oxidation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural at the anode resulting in a photoelectrochemical cell that produces fuel and a useful platform chemical.
  • Stepwise growth of surface-grafted DNA nanotubes visualized at the single-molecule level

    Amani A. Hariri
    22 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2184 Authors: Amani A. Hariri, Graham D. Hamblin, Yasser Gidi, Hanadi F. Sleiman & Gonzalo Cosa DNA nanotubes are attractive building blocks for the assembly of complex arrays. An efficient solid-state synthesis for producing surface-grafted, robust nanotubes has now been devised. Rungs are incorporated in a stepwise manner so that each one is addressable. Using fluorescent tags, the nanotube growth was visualized at the single-molecule level.
 
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    Nature Genetics - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • ALS susceptibility genes

    Kyle Vogan
    26 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 47, 311 (2015). doi:10.1038/ng.3266 Author: Kyle Vogan
  • New genomes clarify mimicry evolution

    James Mallet
    26 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 47, 306 (2015). doi:10.1038/ng.3260 Author: James Mallet For over 100 years, it has been known that polymorphic mimicry is often switched by simple mendelian factors, yet the physical nature of these loci had escaped characterization. Now, the genome sequences of two swallowtail butterfly (Papilio) species have enabled the precise identification of a locus underlying mimicry, adding to unprecedented recent discoveries in mimicry genetics.
  • The two sides of GIGANTEA

    Brooke LaFlamme
    26 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 47, 311 (2015). doi:10.1038/ng.3264 Author: Brooke LaFlamme
  • Transcriptional mimicry by tumor-associated stroma

    Hoon Kim
    26 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 47, 307 (2015). doi:10.1038/ng.3255 Authors: Hoon Kim & Roel G W Verhaak Recent molecular classification of colorectal cancer (CRC) has identified a poor-prognosis transcriptional subtype associated with mesenchymal traits. New studies used CRC transcriptomic data to show that tumor-associated stroma mimics the gene signature of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and found no evidence for EMT of colorectal tumor cells.
  • CRISPR screen for metastasis

    Tiago Faial
    26 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 47, 311 (2015). doi:10.1038/ng.3263 Author: Tiago Faial
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  • Muscle connective tissue controls development of the diaphragm and is a source of congenital diaphragmatic hernias

    Allyson J Merrell
    24 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics. doi:10.1038/ng.3250 Authors: Allyson J Merrell, Benjamin J Ellis, Zachary D Fox, Jennifer A Lawson, Jeffrey A Weiss & Gabrielle Kardon
  • Loss-of-function variants in ABCA7 confer risk of Alzheimer's disease

    Stacy Steinberg
    24 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics. doi:10.1038/ng.3246 Authors: Stacy Steinberg, Hreinn Stefansson, Thorlakur Jonsson, Hrefna Johannsdottir, Andres Ingason, Hannes Helgason, Patrick Sulem, Olafur Th Magnusson, Sigurjon A Gudjonsson, Unnur Unnsteinsdottir, Augustine Kong, Seppo Helisalmi, Hilkka Soininen, James J Lah, Ina Selseth Almdahl, Fred Andersen, Nenad Bogdanovic, Anne Brækhus, Knut Engedal, Arvid Rongve, Ingvild Saltvedt, Eystein Stordal, Aree Witoelar, Dag Aarsland, Tormod Fladby, Ingun D Ulstein, Srdjan Djurovic, Sigrid B Sando, Linda R White, Gun-Peggy Knudsen, Lars T Westlye, Geir Selbæk,…
  • Large-scale whole-genome sequencing of the Icelandic population

    Daniel F Gudbjartsson
    24 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics. doi:10.1038/ng.3247 Authors: Daniel F Gudbjartsson, Hannes Helgason, Sigurjon A Gudjonsson, Florian Zink, Asmundur Oddson, Arnaldur Gylfason, Soren Besenbacher, Gisli Magnusson, Bjarni V Halldorsson, Eirikur Hjartarson, Gunnar Th Sigurdsson, Simon N Stacey, Michael L Frigge, Hilma Holm, Jona Saemundsdottir, Hafdis Th Helgadottir, Hrefna Johannsdottir, Gunnlaugur Sigfusson, Gudmundur Thorgeirsson, Jon Th Sverrisson, Solveig Gretarsdottir, G Bragi Walters, Thorunn Rafnar, Bjarni Thjodleifsson, Einar S Bjornsson, Sigurdur Olafsson, Hildur Thorarinsdottir, Thora Steingrimsdottir,…
  • Identification of a large set of rare complete human knockouts

    Patrick Sulem
    24 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics. doi:10.1038/ng.3243 Authors: Patrick Sulem, Hannes Helgason, Asmundur Oddson, Hreinn Stefansson, Sigurjon A Gudjonsson, Florian Zink, Eirikur Hjartarson, Gunnar Th Sigurdsson, Adalbjorg Jonasdottir, Aslaug Jonasdottir, Asgeir Sigurdsson, Olafur Th Magnusson, Augustine Kong, Agnar Helgason, Hilma Holm, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, Gisli Masson, Daniel F Gudbjartsson & Kari Stefansson Loss-of-function mutations cause many mendelian diseases. Here we aimed to create a catalog of autosomal genes that are completely knocked out in humans by rare loss-of-function mutations. We…
  • The Y-chromosome point mutation rate in humans

    Agnar Helgason
    24 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics. doi:10.1038/ng.3171 Authors: Agnar Helgason, Axel W Einarsson, Valdís B Guðmundsdóttir, Ásgeir Sigurðsson, Ellen D Gunnarsdóttir, Anuradha Jagadeesan, S Sunna Ebenesersdóttir, Augustine Kong & Kári Stefánsson Mutations are the fundamental source of biological variation, and their rate is a crucial parameter for evolutionary and medical studies. Here we used whole-genome sequence data from 753 Icelandic males, grouped into 274 patrilines, to estimate the point mutation rate for 21.3 Mb of male-specific Y chromosome (MSY)…
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    Nature Geoscience - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • Slab stagnation in the shallow lower mantle linked to an increase in mantle viscosity

    Hauke Marquardt
    22 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2393 Authors: Hauke Marquardt & Lowell Miyagi Subduction of oceanic lithosphere is the main process by which material from Earth’s surface and atmosphere is recycled back into the deep mantle. Seismic images indicate that subducting slabs of oceanic lithosphere can stagnate and broaden in the shallow lower mantle. The main phases of the lower mantle, bridgmanite and ferropericlase, do not show any structural transitions at these depths, so only moderate and smooth viscosity variations are expected with depth to at least ∼2,500 km. The reason…
  • Geodynamics: Strength under pressure

    Patrick Cordier
    22 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2402 Author: Patrick Cordier Subducting oceanic crust is sometimes observed to stagnate in the lower mantle. Laboratory experiments show that high pressures in the deep Earth may strengthen mantle rocks, increasing their viscosity and halting the sinking slabs.
  • Cryosphere: Entry beneath ice

    Peter Fretwell
    15 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2396 Author: Peter Fretwell Ice shelves in West Antarctica have been shown to melt where warm circumpolar deep water enters a sub-shelf cavity. A bathymetric reconstruction of Totten Glacier in East Antarctica suggests that the same process may be at work there.
  • Biological oceanography: Life in the deepest depths

    Beth N. Orcutt
    15 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2378 Author: Beth N. Orcutt Deep abyssal clay sediments in organic-poor regions of the ocean present challenging conditions for life. Techniques for identifying cells at extremely low concentrations demonstrate that aerobic microbes are found throughout these deep clays in as much of 37% of the global ocean.
  • Influence of the El Niño/Southern Oscillation on tornado and hail frequency in the United States

    John T. Allen
    15 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2385 Authors: John T. Allen, Michael K. Tippett & Adam H. Sobel The El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is characterized by changes in sea surface temperature (SST) and atmospheric convection in the tropical Pacific, and modulates global weather and climate. The phase of ENSO influences United States (US) temperature and precipitation and has long been hypothesized to influence severe thunderstorm occurrence over the US. However, limitations of the severe thunderstorm observational record, combined with large year-to-year variability, have made it…
 
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    Nature Immunology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • NLRP3 shapes immunity to Leishmania

    Zoltan Fehervari
    18 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Immunology 16, 342 (2015). doi:10.1038/ni.3135 Author: Zoltan Fehervari
  • Announcement: double-blind peer review

    18 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Immunology 16, 327 (2015). doi:10.1038/ni.3129 Nature and its sister journals start offering anonymity to authors during the peer-review process.
  • Immune mechanisms at the maternal-fetal interface: perspectives and challenges

    Mercy PrabhuDas
    18 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Immunology 16, 328 (2015). doi:10.1038/ni.3131 Authors: Mercy PrabhuDas, Elizabeth Bonney, Kathleen Caron, Sudhansu Dey, Adrian Erlebacher, Asgerally Fazleabas, Susan Fisher, Thaddeus Golos, Martin Matzuk, Joseph M McCune, Gil Mor, Laura Schulz, Michael Soares, Thomas Spencer, Jack Strominger, Sing Sing Way & Koji Yoshinaga Leaders gathered at the US National Institutes of Health in November 2014 to discuss recent advances and emerging research areas in aspects of maternal-fetal immunity that may affect fetal development and pregnancy success.
  • Recruiting IRF3

    Ioana Visan
    18 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Immunology 16, 342 (2015). doi:10.1038/ni.3137 Author: Ioana Visan
  • Sox2 as a servant of two masters

    Arun K Mankan
    18 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Immunology 16, 335 (2015). doi:10.1038/ni.3121 Authors: Arun K Mankan & Veit Hornung The transcription factor Sox2 has an additional function in neutrophils, as a cytoplasmic sensor of DNA. Upon binding bacterial DNA, Sox2 initiates a signaling cascade dependent on the kinase TAK1 and adaptor TAB2 that culminates in the expression of genes encoding pro-inflammatory molecules.
 
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    Nature Materials - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • Phonon-induced diamagnetic force and its effect on the lattice thermal conductivity

    Hyungyu Jin
    22 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4247 Authors: Hyungyu Jin, Oscar D. Restrepo, Nikolas Antolin, Stephen R. Boona, Wolfgang Windl, Roberto C. Myers & Joseph P. Heremans
  • Hybrid optical–electrical detection of donor electron spins with bound excitons in silicon

    C. C. Lo
    22 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4250 Authors: C. C. Lo, M. Urdampilleta, P. Ross, M. F. Gonzalez-Zalba, J. Mansir, S. A. Lyon, M. L. W. Thewalt & J. J. L. Morton Electrical detection of spins is an essential tool for understanding the dynamics of spins, with applications ranging from optoelectronics and spintronics, to quantum information processing. For electron spins bound to donors in silicon, bulk electrically detected magnetic resonance has relied on coupling to spin readout partners such as paramagnetic defects or conduction electrons, which fundamentally limits spin coherence…
  • Colloidal nanoplatelets: Energy transfer is speeded up in 2D

    Iwan Moreels
    15 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4246 Author: Iwan Moreels When efficient energy transfer under high carrier densities is required, two-dimensional nanoplatelets are the material of choice, combining an exceptional suppression of nonlinear fluorescence quenching with ultrafast transfer capabilities.
  • Destruction of chemical warfare agents using metal–organic frameworks

    Joseph E. Mondloch
    15 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4238 Authors: Joseph E. Mondloch, Michael J. Katz, William C. Isley III, Pritha Ghosh, Peilin Liao, Wojciech Bury, George W. Wagner, Morgan G. Hall, Jared B. DeCoste, Gregory W. Peterson, Randall Q. Snurr, Christopher J. Cramer, Joseph T. Hupp & Omar K. Farha Chemical warfare agents containing phosphonate ester bonds are among the most toxic chemicals known to mankind. Recent global military events, such as the conflict and disarmament in Syria, have brought into focus the need to find effective strategies for the rapid destruction of these banned…
  • Design of compensated ferrimagnetic Heusler alloys for giant tunable exchange bias

    Ajaya K. Nayak
    15 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4248 Authors: Ajaya K. Nayak, Michael Nicklas, Stanislav Chadov, Panchanana Khuntia, Chandra Shekhar, Adel Kalache, Michael Baenitz, Yurii Skourski, Veerendra K. Guduru, Alessandro Puri, Uli Zeitler, J. M. D. Coey & Claudia Felser Rational material design can accelerate the discovery of materials with improved functionalities. This approach can be implemented in Heusler compounds with tunable magnetic sublattices to demonstrate unprecedented magnetic properties. Here, we have designed a family of Heusler alloys with a compensated ferrimagnetic state. In…
 
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    Nature Methods - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • Sensitive detection of chromatin-altering polymorphisms reveals autoimmune disease mechanisms

    Ricardo Cruz-Herrera del Rosario
    22 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3326 Authors: Ricardo Cruz-Herrera del Rosario, Jeremie Poschmann, Sigrid Laure Rouam, Eileen Png, Chiea Chuen Khor, Martin Lloyd Hibberd & Shyam Prabhakar
  • Identification of active transcriptional regulatory elements from GRO-seq data

    Charles G Danko
    22 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3329 Authors: Charles G Danko, Stephanie L Hyland, Leighton J Core, Andre L Martins, Colin T Waters, Hyung Won Lee, Vivian G Cheung, W Lee Kraus, John T Lis & Adam Siepel
  • Improved specificity of TALE-based genome editing using an expanded RVD repertoire

    Jeffrey C Miller
    22 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3330 Authors: Jeffrey C Miller, Lei Zhang, Danny F Xia, John J Campo, Irina V Ankoudinova, Dmitry Y Guschin, Joshua E Babiarz, Xiangdong Meng, Sarah J Hinkley, Stephen C Lam, David E Paschon, Anna I Vincent, Gladys P Dulay, Kyle A Barlow, David A Shivak, Elo Leung, Jinwon D Kim, Rainier Amora, Fyodor D Urnov, Philip D Gregory & Edward J Rebar
  • Catchup: a mouse model for imaging-based tracking and modulation of neutrophil granulocytes

    Anja Hasenberg
    15 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3322 Authors: Anja Hasenberg, Mike Hasenberg, Linda Männ, Franziska Neumann, Lars Borkenstein, Manuel Stecher, Andreas Kraus, Daniel R Engel, Anika Klingberg, Pegah Seddigh, Zeinab Abdullah, Sabrina Klebow, Swen Engelmann, Annegret Reinhold, Sven Brandau, Michaela Seeling, Ari Waisman, Burkhart Schraven, Joachim R Göthert, Falk Nimmerjahn & Matthias Gunzer
  • CIDRE: an illumination-correction method for optical microscopy

    Kevin Smith
    15 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3323 Authors: Kevin Smith, Yunpeng Li, Filippo Piccinini, Gabor Csucs, Csaba Balazs, Alessandro Bevilacqua & Peter Horvath Uneven illumination affects every image acquired by a microscope. It is often overlooked, but it can introduce considerable bias to image measurements. The most reliable correction methods require special reference images, and retrospective alternatives do not fully model the correction process. Our approach overcomes these issues for most optical microscopy applications without the need for reference images.
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    Nature Nanotechnology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Memory with a spin

    4 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 10, 185 (2015). doi:10.1038/nnano.2015.50 Spintronic devices that electrically store non-volatile information are promising candidates for high-performance, high-density memories.
  • Expect the unexpected

    Renren Deng
    4 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 10, 284 (2015). doi:10.1038/nnano.2015.30 Author: Renren Deng When you have discovered something unusual, trust your instinct and pursue it with determination and enthusiasm, says Renren Deng.
  • A new spin on magnetic memories

    Andrew D. Kent
    4 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 10, 187 (2015). doi:10.1038/nnano.2015.24 Authors: Andrew D. Kent & Daniel C. Worledge Solid-state memory devices with all-electrical read and write operations might lead to faster, cheaper information storage.
  • Control of magnetism by electric fields

    Fumihiro Matsukura
    4 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 10, 209 (2015). doi:10.1038/nnano.2015.22 Authors: Fumihiro Matsukura, Yoshinori Tokura & Hideo Ohno
  • Memory leads the way to better computing

    H.-S. Philip Wong
    4 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 10, 191 (2015). doi:10.1038/nnano.2015.29 Authors: H.-S. Philip Wong & Sayeef Salahuddin New non-volatile memory devices store information using different physical mechanisms from those employed in today's memories and could achieve substantial improvements in computing performance and energy efficiency.
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    Nature Neuroscience - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Carrot or stick in motor learning

    Dagmar Sternad
    25 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 18, 480 (2015). doi:10.1038/nn.3978 Authors: Dagmar Sternad & Konrad Paul Körding A study shows that reward and punishment have distinct influences on motor adaptation. Punishing mistakes accelerates adaptation, whereas rewarding good behavior improves retention.
  • Forming artificial memories during sleep

    Brigitta Gundersen
    25 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 18, 483 (2015). doi:10.1038/nn1504-483 Author: Brigitta Gundersen
  • Cocaine shapes chromatin landscapes via Tet1

    Anne E West
    25 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 18, 478 (2015). doi:10.1038/nn.3985 Author: Anne E West Chronic cocaine exposure induces long-lasting, transcription-dependent changes in neuronal function. A genome-wide sequencing study shows how cocaine changes the epigenome to exert specific, long-lasting effects on neuronal transcription.
  • The compass within

    Nathan W Schultheiss
    25 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 18, 482 (2015). doi:10.1038/nn.3977 Authors: Nathan W Schultheiss & A David Redish Head direction cells have been hypothesized to form representations of an animal's spatial orientation through internal network interactions. New data from mice show the predicted signatures of these internal dynamics.
  • Sugar and Alzheimer's disease: a bittersweet truth

    Costantino Iadecola
    25 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 18, 477 (2015). doi:10.1038/nn.3986 Author: Costantino Iadecola Reductions in brain glucose metabolism have long been associated with Alzheimer's disease. A study now demonstrates that the endothelial glucose transporter GLUT1 is vital for maintaining brain energy metabolism and vascular clearance of amyloid-β.
 
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  • Haploinsufficiency of TBK1 causes familial ALS and fronto-temporal dementia

    Axel Freischmidt
    23 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience. doi:10.1038/nn.4000 Authors: Axel Freischmidt, Thomas Wieland, Benjamin Richter, Wolfgang Ruf, Veronique Schaeffer, Kathrin Müller, Nicolai Marroquin, Frida Nordin, Annemarie Hübers, Patrick Weydt, Susana Pinto, Rayomond Press, Stéphanie Millecamps, Nicolas Molko, Emilien Bernard, Claude Desnuelle, Marie-Hélène Soriani, Johannes Dorst, Elisabeth Graf, Ulrika Nordström, Marisa S Feiler, Stefan Putz, Tobias M Boeckers, Thomas Meyer, Andrea S Winkler, Juliane Winkelman, Mamede de Carvalho, Dietmar R Thal, Markus Otto, Thomas…
  • Global network influences on local functional connectivity

    Adam C Snyder
    22 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience. doi:10.1038/nn.3979 Authors: Adam C Snyder, Michael J Morais, Cory M Willis & Matthew A Smith
  • Model-based choices involve prospective neural activity

    Bradley B Doll
    22 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience. doi:10.1038/nn.3981 Authors: Bradley B Doll, Katherine D Duncan, Dylan A Simon, Daphna Shohamy & Nathaniel D Daw
  • Retrieval induces adaptive forgetting of competing memories via cortical pattern suppression

    Maria Wimber
    15 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience. doi:10.1038/nn.3973 Authors: Maria Wimber, Arjen Alink, Ian Charest, Nikolaus Kriegeskorte & Michael C Anderson
  • Role of Tet1 and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in cocaine action

    Jian Feng
    15 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience. doi:10.1038/nn.3976 Authors: Jian Feng, Ningyi Shao, Keith E Szulwach, Vincent Vialou, Jimmy Huynh, Chun Zhong, Thuc Le, Deveroux Ferguson, Michael E Cahill, Yujing Li, Ja Wook Koo, Efrain Ribeiro, Benoit Labonte, Benjamin M Laitman, David Estey, Victoria Stockman, Pamela Kennedy, Thomas Couroussé, Isaac Mensah, Gustavo Turecki, Kym F Faull, Guo-li Ming, Hongjun Song, Guoping Fan, Patrizia Casaccia, Li Shen, Peng Jin & Eric J Nestler
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    Nature Physics - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Dwarf-galaxy giants

    May Chiao
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics 11, 210 (2015). doi:10.1038/nphys3281 Author: May Chiao
  • Phase out

    Luke Fleet
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics 11, 210 (2015). doi:10.1038/nphys3285 Author: Luke Fleet
  • Too cool to work

    Xavier Moya
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics 11, 202 (2015). doi:10.1038/nphys3271 Authors: Xavier Moya, Emmanuel Defay, Volker Heine & Neil D. Mathur Magnetocaloric and electrocaloric effects are driven by doing work, but this work has barely been explored, even though these caloric effects are being exploited in a growing number of prototype cooling devices.
  • Ten years of Nature Physics: Jack of all trades

    Robin Côté
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics 11, 219 (2015). doi:10.1038/nphys3250 Author: Robin Côté Over the past decade, ultracold polar molecules have found application in hybrid quantum computation and quantum simulation, directions established in three early papers published in Nature Physics.
  • In search of Majorana

    Mark Buchanan
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics 11, 206 (2015). doi:10.1038/nphys3275 Author: Mark Buchanan
 
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  • Even-denominator fractional quantum Hall physics in ZnO

    J. Falson
    22 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3259 Authors: J. Falson, D. Maryenko, B. Friess, D. Zhang, Y. Kozuka, A. Tsukazaki, J. H. Smet & M. Kawasaki
  • A quantum advantage for inferring causal structure

    Katja Ried
    22 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3266 Authors: Katja Ried, Megan Agnew, Lydia Vermeyden, Dominik Janzing, Robert W. Spekkens & Kevin J. Resch
  • A Planck-scale limit on spacetime fuzziness and stochastic Lorentz invariance violation

    Vlasios Vasileiou
    15 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3270 Authors: Vlasios Vasileiou, Jonathan Granot, Tsvi Piran & Giovanni Amelino-Camelia Wheeler’s ‘spacetime-foam’ picture of quantum gravity (QG) suggests spacetime fuzziness (fluctuations leading to non-deterministic effects) at distances comparable to the Planck length, LPl ≈ 1.62 × 10−33 cm, the inverse (in natural units) of the Planck energy, EPl ≈ 1.22 × 1019 GeV. The resulting non-deterministic motion of photons on the Planck scale is expected to produce energy-dependent stochastic fluctuations in their…
  • Quantum gravity: Spacetime fuzziness in focus

    Agnieszka Jacholkowska
    15 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3293 Author: Agnieszka Jacholkowska Photons emitted by extragalactic sources provide an opportunity to test quantum gravity effects that modify the speed of light in vacuum. Studying the arrival times of these cosmic messengers further constrains the energy scales involved.
  • Orbital textures and charge density waves in transition metal dichalcogenides

    T. Ritschel
    15 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3267 Authors: T. Ritschel, J. Trinckauf, K. Koepernik, B. Büchner, M. v. Zimmermann, H. Berger, Y. I. Joe, P. Abbamonte & J. Geck Low-dimensional electron systems, as realized in layered materials, often tend to spontaneously break the symmetry of the underlying nuclear lattice by forming so-called density waves; a state of matter that at present attracts enormous attention. Here we reveal a remarkable and surprising feature of charge density waves, namely their intimate relation to orbital order. For the prototypical material 1T-TaS2 we not only show…
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    Nature Reviews Cancer - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Tumour microenvironment: Clearing the air for T cells

    M. Teresa Villanueva
    23 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 15, 199 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrc3940 Author: M. Teresa Villanueva Antitumour T cells are suppressed by hypoxic tumour areas enriched in extracellular adenosine through activation of A2A adenosine receptors (A2ARs). Hatfield et al. found that mice with lung tumours given supplementary oxygen have improved tumour oxygenation. This enhanced intratumoural infiltration of T cells, reduced
  • Circulating tumour cells: Breaking free

    M. Teresa Villanueva
    23 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 15, 199 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrc3941 Author: M. Teresa Villanueva By analysing the phenotype of circulating tumour cells in the bone marrow of patients with early-disseminated breast cancer, Werner et al. have shown that dissemination might be driven by low levels of retinoic acid-induced 2 (RAI2). Depletion of RAI2 in luminal breast cancer cell
  • Tumour microenvironment: Driving relapse

    Gemma K. Alderton
    23 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 15, 195 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrc3935 Author: Gemma K. Alderton Two papers in Nature Genetics report on the role of stromal cells, especially cancer-associated fibroblasts, in poor-prognosis colorectal cancer.
  • Caveolae and signalling in cancer

    Ubaldo E. Martinez-Outschoorn
    23 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 15, 225 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrc3915 Authors: Ubaldo E. Martinez-Outschoorn, Federica Sotgia & Michael P. Lisanti It has been over 20 years since the discovery that caveolar lipid rafts function as signalling organelles. Lipid rafts create plasma membrane heterogeneity, and caveolae are the most extensively studied subset of lipid rafts. A newly emerging paradigm is that changes in caveolae also generate
  • Treatment response: Stay warm

    M. Teresa Villanueva
    23 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 15, 199 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrc3943 Author: M. Teresa Villanueva Eng et al. have found that the standard temperature at which mice are housed has an effect on treatment response. The sensitivity of several pancreatic tumour models to cytotoxic therapies was increased when mice were housed at a temperature of 30 °C compared with
 
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    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • Organs-on-chips at the frontiers of drug discovery

    Eric W. Esch
    19 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery. doi:10.1038/nrd4539 Authors: Eric W. Esch, Anthony Bahinski & Dongeun Huh
  • Eric Karran

    19 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery. doi:10.1038/nrd4584 More than 45 million people worldwide are estimated to have Alzheimer's disease (AD) or some type of dementia, and there are few therapeutics to help them. Although a handful of high-profile candidates are currently being tested in expensive large-scale clinical trials, the neurodegenerative space is particularly fraught with failure. As problematically, the early-stage pipeline for AD is running dry. So what happens if plan A fails again, as it has so many times in the past? Eric Karran, Director of Research at Alzheimer's Research UK, hopes…
  • New treatment options for hearing loss

    Ulrich Müller
    19 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery. doi:10.1038/nrd4533 Authors: Ulrich Müller & Peter G. Barr-Gillespie
  • Secondary pharmacology data to assess potential off-target activity of new drugs: a regulatory perspective

    Thomas Papoian
    19 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery. doi:10.1038/nrd3845-c1 Authors: Thomas Papoian, Haw-Jyh Chiu, Ikram Elayan, Gowraganahalli Jagadeesh, Imran Khan, Adebayo A. Laniyonu, Cindy Xinguang Li, Muriel Saulnier, Natalie Simpson & Baichun Yang
  • Market watch: Upcoming catalysts in Q2 2015

    Justin Burns
    12 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery. doi:10.1038/nrd4598 Author: Justin Burns
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    Nature Reviews Genetics - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Genomics: Benchmarking genome analysis pipelines

    Orli G. Bahcall
    17 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 194 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg3930 Author: Orli G. Bahcall Highnam et al. present an open online platform to facilitate the testing and comparison of genome analysis methods using a standardized set of performance metrics and datasets. The platform hosts selected sets of raw sequence reads, which users can download for use in their
  • Genetic testing: Genetic risk and statin preventative therapy

    Orli G. Bahcall
    17 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 194 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg3928 Author: Orli G. Bahcall Mega, Stitziel et al. test the clinical use of a multi-locus genetic risk score including a composite of 27 genetic variants associated with coronary heart disease. In community-based and primary or secondary prevention studies, they find that a higher genetic risk score is associated
  • Pathogen genetics: S. aureus multi-host tropism

    Orli G. Bahcall
    17 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 194 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg3929 Author: Orli G. Bahcall The Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex CC121 is a common cause of human skin and soft-tissue infections, as well as the source of a recent epidemic in rabbits. Viana et al. track the evolution of the multi-host tropism of this lineage. Phylogenetic analysis based
  • Cancer genetics: CRISPR screens go in vivo

    Darren J. Burgess
    17 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 194 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg3924 Author: Darren J. Burgess CRISPR–Cas9 is a powerful system for gene disruption and gene editing that has recently been applied for genome-wide functional screens in vitro. A new study shows that CRISPR–Cas9 screens are feasible in vivo and can be used to identify tumour suppressor genes.Chen,
  • Evolution: Polyploid gains

    Darren J. Burgess
    17 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 196 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg3925 Author: Darren J. Burgess The induction of polyploidy — that is, duplication or acquisition of entire sets of chromosomes — is a common event in the evolutionary histories of various species. The evolutionary consequences of polyploidization have mostly been inferred based on correlations with adaptive transitions during evolution. A
 
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    Nature Reviews Immunology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Neutrophils: New sensor of bacterial DNA

    Elisabeth Kugelberg
    24 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 15, 200 (2015). doi:10.1038/nri3840 Author: Elisabeth Kugelberg The transcription factor SOX2 detects bacterial DNA in neutrophils, which leads to the activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines.
  • Neonatal immunity: Fetal immune repertoire

    Olive Leavy
    24 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 15, 201 (2015). doi:10.1038/nri3841 Author: Olive Leavy Determining the ontogeny of the human fetal adaptive immune system has important implications for defining the infectious risk of prematurely born infants. However, due to technical limitations, little is known about the full diversity of the fetal immune repertoire. In this study, the authors used
  • Neuroimmunology: TREM2 in Alzheimer disease

    Olive Leavy
    24 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 15, 201 (2015). doi:10.1038/nri3842 Author: Olive Leavy Several variants in TREM2 (triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2), including an Arg47His mutation, are associated with increased risk of Alzheimer disease (AD). Two recent papers have examined the effect of Trem2 deficiency in mouse models of AD (APP/PS1 and 5XFAD mice)
  • Regulation of antiviral T cell responses by type I interferons

    Josh Crouse
    19 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 15, 231 (2015). doi:10.1038/nri3806 Authors: Josh Crouse, Ulrich Kalinke & Annette Oxenius Type I interferons (IFNs) are pro-inflammatory cytokines that are rapidly induced in different cell types during viral infections. The consequences of type I IFN signalling include direct antiviral activity, innate immune cell activation and regulation of adaptive immune responses. In this Review, we discuss recent
  • HIV: On the road to an HIV vaccine?

    Olive Leavy
    19 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 15, 202 (2015). doi:10.1038/nri3836 Author: Olive Leavy A new construct termed eCD4-Ig neutralizes all tested HIV isolates and protects macaques from multiple SHIV challenges.
 
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    Nature Reviews Microbiology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Viral infection: Better protection against HIV

    Naomi Attar
    15 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 186 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3462 Author: Naomi Attar Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors that express HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) have had limited success owing to the large proportion of HIV-1 isolates that remain partially or wholly resistant to bNAbs. Gardner et al. now present a new approach in which bNAbs are replaced
  • Viral pathogenesis: Travelling in clusters

    Naomi Attar
    15 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 186 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3460 Author: Naomi Attar Host-cell entry and exit are traditionally viewed as processes that viruses undergo as independent units. However, Chen et al. now describe a novel intercellular transport pathway, in which clusters of approximately 20 mature enterovirus particles, such as poliovirus, are packaged into phosphatidylserine (PS)-enriched vesicles
  • Bacterial evolution: Bugs-to-bunny in a single-hit tropism shift

    Naomi Attar
    15 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 186 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3461 Author: Naomi Attar The genetic changes that enable pathogens to jump from one host species to another, which often results in epidemic disease, are poorly understood. To identify the molecular basis of host adaptation, Penadés and colleagues traced the evolutionary history of Staphylococcus aureus ST121, which switched
  • Bacterial toxins: A signal for toxin production

    Andrea Du Toit
    15 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 187 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3465 Author: Andrea Du Toit Toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains produce toxin A and toxin B, which have been implicated in pathogenesis; however, the molecular mechanisms regulating toxin production are elusive. Darkoh et al. now show that the Agr quorum sensing system has a role in toxin expression through
  • Viral infection: Tracking down HIV's hiding place

    Naomi Attar
    15 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 186 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3466 Author: Naomi Attar A new study finds that HIV-1 preferentially integrates into regions of chromatin that are proximal to nuclear pores.
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    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Stem cells: Linking stemness to low DNA damage

    Kim Baumann
    22 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 16, 205 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrm3977 Author: Kim Baumann The frequency of genomic mutations is much lower in embryonic stem cells (ES cells) than in somatic cells, but the mechanisms that contribute to genome stability in ES cells remain largely unknown. Xiong et al. now find that the zinc-finger protein Sall4, which is
  • Protein metabolism: Get3 hides transmembrane domains in its pocket

    Kim Baumann
    22 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 16, 205 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrm3978 Author: Kim Baumann Tail-anchored (TA) membrane proteins are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) post-translationally by the guided entry of TA proteins (GET) pathway; this involves the formation of a complex between the TA protein and the cytosolic factor Get3. During transit, the hydrophobic transmembrane domain (TMD) of
  • RNA metabolism: m6A modulates RNA structure

    Eytan Zlotorynski
    22 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 16, 204 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrm3974 Author: Eytan Zlotorynski N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is an RNA modification that regulates transcript metabolism. Liu et al. now report that m6A induces structural remodelling in RNAs and that this affects gene expression. They found that a m6A in a hairpin
  • Transcription: A novel termination pathway

    Kim Baumann
    22 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 16, 205 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrm3976 Author: Kim Baumann The mechanisms involved in the processing of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are largely uncharacterized. Dhir et al. now find that transcription termination of lncRNA transcripts containing primary miRNAs (lnc-pri-miRNAs) — which encode 17.5% of human miRNAs — involves cleavage by the Microprocessor complex rather
  • Cell signalling: When signals cross

    Andrea Du Toit
    22 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 16, 204 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrm3973 Author: Andrea Du Toit TGF-β–SMAD signalling regulates growth and epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) transition. Thien et al. now show that tuberous sclerosis protein TSC1, which in complex with TSC2 inhibits mTOR-dependent growth and proliferation, interacts with the TGF-β receptor complex and SMAD2/3, and mediates their association, thereby facilitating SMAD2/3 phosphorylation,
 
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    Nature Reviews Neuroscience - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Neural development: Expanding horizons

    Natasha Bray
    19 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 188 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrn3944 Author: Natasha Bray Progenitor cells, such as radial glia, mitose during cortical development. Florio et al. performed RNA-seq analysis on subtypes of progenitor cells and neurons from mouse and human fetal neocortex. They identified one gene, ARHGAP11B, that was upregulated in human radial glia compared to
  • Molecular mechanisms in the regulation of adult neurogenesis during stress

    Martin Egeland
    19 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 189 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrn3855 Authors: Martin Egeland, Patricia A. Zunszain & Carmine M. Pariante Coping with stress is fundamental for mental health, but understanding of the molecular neurobiology of stress is still in its infancy. Adult neurogenesis is well known to be regulated by stress, and conversely adult neurogenesis regulates stress responses. Recent studies in neurogenic cells indicate that
  • Sensory processing: Whiskers of a good friend

    Natasha Bray
    19 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 188 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrn3943 Author: Natasha Bray How social information influences cortical processing is unclear. Here, the authors took whole-cell recordings from neurons in the barrel cortex of awake, head-restrained rats that were whisking freely or nose-to-nose with another rat. Compared with free whisking, 'social' whisking induced depolarization and larger, more-frequent fluctuations
  • Neural circuits: Freeze — you're under arrest

    Natasha Bray
    19 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 188 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrn3941 Author: Natasha Bray The role of the intralaminar nuclei of the thalamus (ILN) in behaviour is unknown. Giber et al. found neurons co-expressing GABA and glycine in the mouse ILN that originate in the pontine reticular formation (PRF) of the brainstem. Optogenetic stimulation of these cells in
  • Visual attention span deficits and assessing causality in developmental dyslexia

    Usha Goswami
    19 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 225 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrn3836-c2 Author: Usha Goswami In my recent Opinion article (Sensory theories of developmental dyslexia: three challenges for research. Nature Rev. Neurosci.16, 43–54 (2015)), I described the challenges in establishing causality for each of the main sensory-deficit theories of developmental dyslexia.
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    Nature Reviews Cardiology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Valvular disease: Prognostic relevance of pulmonary hypertension in valvular disease

    Gregory B. Lim
    9 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 12, 194 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2015.29 Author: Gregory B. Lim In two papers published in the American Journal of Cardiology, the presence of pulmonary hypertension in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) or exercise pulmonary hypertension in patients with secondary mitral regurgitation, have been found to be important independent predictors of poor prognosis.
  • Hypertension: Arteriovenous anastomosis—next panacea for hypertension?

    Felix Mahfoud
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 12, 197 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2015.24 Authors: Felix Mahfoud & Michael Böhm The ROX CONTROL HTN study demonstrated the efficacy of arteriovenous coupler therapy in patients with resistant hypertension. However, one-third of the patients developed late ipsilateral venous stenosis, which required venoplasty or stenting. Future research is needed to identify the risk–benefit ratio of this new approach.
  • Antiplatelet therapy: Vorapaxar in diabetes and MI

    Gregory B. Lim
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 12, 195 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2015.27 Author: Gregory B. Lim Vorapaxar added to standard therapy significantly reduces the risk of major vascular events in patients with diabetes mellitus and previous myocardial infarction (MI), according to an analysis of data from the TRA 2oP-TIMI 50 trial. Vorapaxar is an antagonist of the protease-activated receptor
  • Device therapy: High-zone programming of ICDs reduces inappropriate shocks

    Karina Huynh
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 12, 193 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2015.25 Author: Karina Huynh Implantable cardioverter–defibrillator (ICD) therapy is indicated for high-risk patients with heart failure, according to current European and US guidelines. However, a substantial number of these patients receive inappropriate shocks, which can impair their quality of life, and result in increased mortality. Investigators of the RISSY-ICD
  • Atrial fibrillation: Migraine improvement after AF ablation

    João H. Duarte
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 12, 195 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2015.26 Author: João H. Duarte In a new, open-label, prospective study of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) undergoing catheter ablation, the frequency and severity of migraine symptoms was reduced after the intervention.Patients indicated for AF ablation with an established diagnosis of migraine (group 1; n = 40) or
 
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    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Immunotherapy: The development of immunotherapy in urothelial bladder cancer

    Tom Powles
    16 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 12, 193 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2015.51 Author: Tom Powles Recent data indicate that immune-checkpoint inhibitors have activity in patients with chemotherapy-refractory metastatic urothelial bladder cancer and further confirmatory trials are ongoing. Future research, including development of informative biomarker assessments, investigation of combination therapy and testing agents at earlier stages of disease is required to further explore this potential benefit.
  • Breast cancer: CLEOPATRA sheds light on how to tackle metastatic disease

    Alessia Errico
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 12, 188 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2015.40 Author: Alessia Errico Metastatic breast cancer that overexpresses HER2 has historically been one of the most aggressive forms of the disease, and is associated with a poor prognosis. The comprehensive HER2 blockade achieved with the combination of the anti-HER2 humanized monoclonal antibodies pertuzumab and trastuzumab plus chemotherapy has
  • Epidemiology: Cancer survival: global variation and long-term trends

    Georgios Lyratzopoulos
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 12, 191 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2015.36 Author: Georgios Lyratzopoulos Two recently published studies provide state-of-the-art evidence on the varying pace of improvement in survival across different cancers, and regarding inequalities in cancer survival between countries and regions. These studies offer rich and contrasting data that can guide policy priorities and research initiatives, and showcase the need for further development of population-based cancer surveillance across the globe.
  • CD30-targeting immunoconjugates and bystander effects

    Shigeo Masuda
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 12, 245 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2014.159-c1 Authors: Shigeo Masuda, Shigeru Miyagawa, Nagako Sougawa & Yoshiki Sawa Immunoconjugates, also known as antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), consist of monocloncal antibodies and cytotoxic drugs (for example, monomethyl auristatin E [MMAE], a potent mitotic spindle formation inhibitor), which are connected by a linker. The elegant Review by Smaglo and colleagues (The development of immunoconjugates for
  • Genetics: Myeloproliferative neoplasms—order of mutations counts!

    Lisa Hutchinson
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 12, 187 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2015.39 Author: Lisa Hutchinson Myeloproliferative neoplasms are chronic myeloid diseases that can reflect an early stage of tumorigenesis. Patients with these neoplasms are identified early in the disease trajectory because of the over-production of mature cells types. JAK2 is mutated in the vast majority of patients with myeloproliferative
 
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    Nature Reviews Endocrinology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Diabetes: Genetically engineered Lactobacilli reprogram intestinal cells to secrete insulin and ameliorate hyperglycaemia

    David Holmes
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Endocrinology 11, 192 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrendo.2015.45 Author: David Holmes Oral administration of Lactobacilli engineered to secrete the inactive full-length form of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-11–37) markedly reduces blood glucose levels, according to a new study in rats. The findings have potential implications for the treatment of patients with type 1 diabetes
  • Autoimmunity: T1DM and the gut microbiome

    Jennifer Sargent
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Endocrinology 11, 193 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrendo.2015.15 Author: Jennifer Sargent The genetic contribution to development of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is well established. However, a rapid increase in prevalence of the disease over the past few decades and the finding that only a small portion of children who carry predisposing HLA risk alleles develop
  • The endocrinology of taste receptors

    Sara Santa-Cruz Calvo
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Endocrinology 11, 213 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrendo.2015.7 Authors: Sara Santa-Cruz Calvo & Josephine M. Egan Levels of obesity have reached epidemic proportions on a global scale, which has led to considerable increases in health problems and increased risk of several diseases, including cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, cancer and diabetes mellitus. People with obesity consume more food than is needed to
  • Metabolism: Exercise remodels subcutaneous fat tissue and improves metabolism

    Harriet Wallberg-Henriksson
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Endocrinology 11, 198 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrendo.2015.24 Authors: Harriet Wallberg-Henriksson & Juleen R. Zierath Exercise training is one of the key interventions for preventing and treating type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although the health-promoting effects of exercise are largely ascribed to improvements in skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity, new data published in Diabetes suggest 'exercise-trained' subcutaneous adipose tissue might also have an important role in enhancing glucose homeostasis.
  • Metabolism: Hepatic insulin resistance—missing link identified

    David Holmes
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Endocrinology 11, 193 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrendo.2015.17 Author: David Holmes Increased levels of hepatic acetyl CoA resulting from macrophage-induced lipolysis of white adipose tissue (WAT) are responsible for the failure of insulin to suppress gluconeogenesis in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), according to new research. The findings challenge the existing view that inflammation-mediated hepatic insulin
 
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    Nature Reviews Nephrology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Renal injury: KLF6 protects injured podocytes

    Jessica K. Edwards
    9 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Nephrology 11, 197 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrneph.2015.29 Author: Jessica K. Edwards A new study suggests that Krüppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) is an early inducible response gene that maintains mitochondrial function and prevents apoptosis of injured podocytes through the transcriptional regulation of cytochrome c oxidase assembly protein (SCO2). Mitochondrial dysfunction has previously been
  • Epidemiology: Spotlight on CKD deaths—increasing mortality worldwide

    Connie M. Rhee
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Nephrology 11, 199 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrneph.2015.25 Authors: Connie M. Rhee & Csaba P. Kovesdy In the USA, mortality among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease has declined over the past two decades. By contrast, new data indicate that the rate of CKD-associated deaths is increasing worldwide. This important finding highlights CKD as a major contributor to global morbidity and mortality.
  • Hypertension: Lymphocyte adaptor protein puts the 'brakes' on hypertension

    Jessica K. Edwards
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Nephrology 11, 198 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrneph.2015.24 Author: Jessica K. Edwards A recent report by Meena Madhur and colleagues describes a role for lymphocyte adaptor protein (LNK; also known as SH2B3) in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension and associated vascular and renal dysfunction. LNK functions as a negative regulator of cytokine signalling and cellular proliferation, but
  • Transplantation: Promising outcomes of HIV-positive-to-HIV-positive kidney transplantation

    Ellen F. Carney
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Nephrology 11, 197 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrneph.2015.23 Author: Ellen F. Carney Transplantation of kidneys from HIV-positive donors is “an additional treatment option” for HIV-positive patients who require renal replacement therapy, suggest Elmi Muller and colleagues. In their new paper, these researchers report the medium-term outcomes of HIV-positive-to-HIV-positive kidney transplantation in Groote Schuur Hospital, South Africa.“In
  • Development: β-catenin network controls nephron patterning

    Susan J. Allison
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Nephrology 11, 195 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrneph.2015.22 Author: Susan J. Allison Correct patterning and segmentation of nephrons during renal development is essential for proper nephron functioning, but current understanding of the pathways involved in regulating nephron patterning is limited. New findings show that β-catenin forms an activity gradient along the length of the nephron, through which
 
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    Nature Reviews Urology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Psychosocial perspectives on sexual recovery after prostate cancer treatment

    Lauren M. Walker
    9 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Urology 12, 167 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrurol.2015.29 Authors: Lauren M. Walker, Richard J. Wassersug & John W. Robinson Many therapies for erectile dysfunction (ED) after prostate cancer treatment improve erectile firmness, yet, most couples stop using aids within 1–2 years. Patients and partners who expect immediate and complete success with their first ED treatment can be demoralized when they experience treatment failure, which
  • Radiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer

    Jahan J. Mohiuddin
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Urology 12, 145 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrurol.2015.25 Authors: Jahan J. Mohiuddin, Brock R. Baker & Ronald C. Chen The combination of radiation treatment and long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been shown in multiple clinical trials to prolong overall survival in men with high-risk prostate cancer compared with either treatment alone. New radiation technologies enable the safe delivery of high radiation doses that
  • Risk-adapted strategy for the kidney-sparing management of upper tract tumours

    Thomas Seisen
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Urology 12, 155 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrurol.2015.24 Authors: Thomas Seisen, Pierre Colin & Morgan Rouprêt The conservative management of upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) was traditionally restricted to patients with imperative indications only. However, current recommendations suggest selected patients with normal, functioning contralateral kidneys should also be considered for such an approach. A risk-adapted strategy to accurately select patients who
  • Prostate cancer: Breaking AKR1C3-mediated enzalutamide resistance by inhibiting androgen synthesis

    Clemens Thoma
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Urology 12, 124 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrurol.2015.31 Author: Clemens Thoma Upregulation of AKR1C3 expression and resultant intracrine androgens in prostate cancer cells is a mechanism of resistance to enzalutamide that can be overcome by the NSAID indometacin, suggests a new study by Chengfei Liu and colleagues from the University of California at Davis, Sacramento,
  • Prostate cancer: AR targeting—it all makes sense

    Louise Stone
    16 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Urology 12, 125 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrurol.2015.26 Author: Louise Stone Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting the full-length androgen receptor (AR-FL) and androgen receptor variants (ARVs) are a rational third-line approach for treating castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) that is also resistant to androgen-receptor (AR)-pathway inhibitors, new research has shown. Yamamoto et al. designed three ASOs
 
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    Naturejobs - Search results

  • Manufacturing Technician 2nd Shift BAM

    28 Mar 2015 | 12:16 am
    Position Summary:Works alone or with other technicians performs filling and/or packaging of products. Comply with GMP, ISO 13485 guidelines and company SOPs, performs the following duties on either the reagent or controls line.Performs duties on the packaging line to prepare and pack materials as needed to produce kits, if required in work area.Must be able to complete and understand production paper work with minimal to no errors, up to and including product reconciliation, label reconciliation...
  • Scientist II Cell Biology

    28 Mar 2015 | 12:16 am
    Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc. (NYSE: TMO) is the world leader in serving science, with revenues of $17 billion and approximately 50,000 employees in 50 countries. Our mission is to enable our customers to make the world healthier, cleaner and safer. We help our customers accelerate life sciences research, solve complex analytical challenges, improve patient diagnostics and increase laboratory productivity. Through our premier brands - Thermo Scientific, Applied Biosystems, Invitrogen, Fisher Sci...
  • Life Science Account Manager

    28 Mar 2015 | 12:16 am
    Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc (Life Technologies). (NYSE: TMO) is the world leader in serving science, with revenues of $17 billion and 50,000 employees in 50 countries. Our mission is to enable our customers to make the world healthier, cleaner and safer. We help our customers accelerate life sciences research, solve complex analytical challenges, improve patient diagnostics and increase laboratory productivity. Our four premier brands - Life Technologies, Thermo Scientific, Fisher Scientific an...
  • Director Corporate Financial Planning & Analysis

    28 Mar 2015 | 12:16 am
    Position Summary: As key member of the Corporate Financial Planning and Analysis (FP&A) team supporting the Chief Financial Officer’s (CFO) Office, this position will play a leadership role in both developing and providing analytics for the corporate functions and key total company metrics. This role will also develop presentations and analysis for the Company Board of Director meetings, Company Leadership Team (CLT), CEO Leadership Summits, Earnings Calls and Investor Analysts meetings.Key Resp...
  • Account Manager New York City

    28 Mar 2015 | 12:16 am
    Position Summary: The Account Manager for this Healthcare Market Division position supports the sales territory and reports to the District Manager. The incumbent will maintain and improve existing customer relations while establishing new accounts as well. This position will be charged with increasing profitable sales by selling consumable and diagnostic lab supplies / instrumentation (capital equipment). Partnering with the appropriate sales specialist, corporate account sales team, supplier p...
 
 
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    British Journal of Pharmacology

  • A novel CGRP-neutralizing Spiegelmer attenuates neurogenic plasma protein extravasation

    K Hoehlig, K W Johnson, E Pryazhnikov, C Maasch, A Clemens-Smith, W G Purschke, S Vauléon, K Buchner, F Jarosch, L Khiroug, A Vater, S Klussmann
    27 Mar 2015 | 5:23 am
    Background and PurposeCalcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) plays an important role in the pathology of migraine, and recent clinical trials suggest the inhibition of CGRP-mediated processes as a new therapeutic option in migraine. In this study, we describe the generation of NOX-L41, a CGRP-neutralizing mirror-image (l-)aptamer (Spiegelmer) and investigate its in vitro and in vivo function. Experimental ApproachA CGRP-binding Spiegelmer was identified by in vitro selection. Binding studies were performed using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and the inhibitory activity was determined in…
  • Kaempferol enhances endothelium-dependent relaxation in the porcine coronary artery through activation of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels

    Y C Xu, S W S Leung, G P H Leung, R Y K Man
    27 Mar 2015 | 5:22 am
    Background and PurposeKaempferol, a plant flavonoid present in normal human diet, can modulate vasomotor tone. The present study aimed to elucidate the signalling pathway through which this flavonoid enhanced relaxation of vascular smooth muscle. Experimental ApproachThe effect of kaempferol on the relaxation of porcine coronary arteries to endothelium-dependent (bradykinin) and -independent (sodium nitroprusside) relaxing agents was studied in an in vitro organ chamber setup. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to determine the effect of kaempferol on potassium channels in porcine…
  • Class A1 scavenger receptors in cardiovascular diseases

    Jingjing Ben, Xudong Zhu, Hanwen Zhang, Qi Chen
    27 Mar 2015 | 5:22 am
    Class A1 scavenger receptors (SR-A1) are membrane glycoproteins that can form homotrimers. This receptor was originally defined by its ability to mediate the accumulation of lipids in macrophages. Subsequent studies reveal that SR-A1 plays critical roles in innate immunity, cell apoptosis and proliferation. This review highlights recent advances in understanding the structure, receptor pathway and regulation of SR-A1. Although its role in atherosclerosis is disputable, recent discoveries suggest that SR-A1 function in anti-inflammatory responses by promoting an M2 macrophage phenotype in…
  • A store-operated calcium channel inhibitor attenuates collagen-induced arthritis

    X H Gao, R Gao, Y Z Tian, P McGonigle, J E Barrett, Y Dai, H Hu
    27 Mar 2015 | 5:22 am
    Background and PurposeStore-operated calcium (SOC) channels are thought to play a critical role in immune responses, inflammatory diseases and chronic pain. The aim of this study was to explore the potential role and mechanisms of SOC channels in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Experimental ApproachThe CIA mouse model was used to examine the effects of the SOC channel inhibitor YM-58483 on CIA and arthritic pain. Hargreaves' and von Frey hair tests were conducted to measure thermal and mechanical sensitivities of hind paws. elisa was performed to measure cytokine production, and…
  • HuR mediates the synergistic effects of angiotensin II and IL-1β on vascular COX-2 expression and cell migration

    A Aguado, C Rodríguez, S Martínez-Revelles, M S Avendaño, O Zhenyukh, M Orriols, J Martínez-González, M J Alonso, A M Briones, D A Dixon, M Salaices
    27 Mar 2015 | 5:21 am
    Background and PurposeAngiotensin II (AngII) and IL-1β are involved in cardiovascular diseases through the induction of inflammatory pathways. HuR is an adenylate- and uridylate-rich element (ARE)-binding protein involved in the mRNA stabilization of many genes. This study investigated the contribution of HuR to the increased expression of COX-2 induced by AngII and IL-1β and its consequences on VSMC migration and remodelling. Experimental ApproachRat and human VSMCs were stimulated with AngII (0.1 μM) and/or IL-1β (10 ng·mL−1). Mice were infused with AngII or subjected to carotid…
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    PSI-Nature Structural Biology Knowledgebase

  • Channels and Transporters: BEST in Show

    Cosma Dellisanti
    18 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    PSI-Nature Structural Biology Knowledgebase (2015). doi:10.1038/sbkb.2015.6 Author: Cosma Dellisanti Crystal structures of bestrophin ion channels unravel the molecular basis of retinopathies.
  • Channels and Transporters: Reorienting a Peptide in the Pocket

    Angela K. Eggleston
    18 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    PSI-Nature Structural Biology Knowledgebase (2015). doi:10.1038/sbkb.2015.7 Author: Angela K. Eggleston In POT transporters, peptide length determines whether the orientation of the ligand is lateral or vertical.
  • XFELs probe protein dynamics

    Rita Strack
    28 Jan 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Methods 12, 109 (2015). doi:10.1038/nmeth.3277 Author: Rita Strack A new study shows that time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography can reveal high-resolution intermediates of photoactive yellow protein.
  • Cryo-EM strikes gold

    Allison Doerr
    28 Jan 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Methods 12, 102 (2015). doi:10.1038/nmeth.3273 Author: Allison Doerr Gold supports nearly eliminate unwanted specimen motion in cryo-electron microscopy, enabling high-resolution structure determination of challenging proteins.
  • Expanding the Reach of SAD

    Allison Doerr
    18 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    PSI-Nature Structural Biology Knowledgebase (2015). doi:10.1038/sbkb.2015.8 Author: Allison Doerr Two recent methods increase the range of SAD phasing to more challenging protein structures.
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