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  • Immunotherapy: Personalizing tumour vaccines

    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology - AOP - nature.com science feeds
    David Killock
    15 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology. doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2014.220 Author: David Killock
  • Therapeutic resistance: Blocking the gatekeeper

    Nature Reviews Cancer - Issue - nature.com science feeds
    Sarah Seton-Rogers
    23 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 14, 766 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrc3871 Author: Sarah Seton-Rogers Tan et al. have identified covalent inhibitors of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) that can block the proliferation of cells expressing FGFR1 or FGFR2 gatekeeper mutants, which are resistant to the first generation FGFR inhibitors that are being tested clinically for a variety
  • A decade of innovation in pharmaceutical R&D: the Chorus model

    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery - AOP - nature.com science feeds
    Paul K. Owens
    14 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery. doi:10.1038/nrd4497 Authors: Paul K. Owens, Eyas Raddad, Jeffrey W. Miller, John R. Stille, Kenneth G. Olovich, Neil V. Smith, Rosie S. Jones & Joel C. Scherer
  • The Innovative Medicines Initiative: an engine for regulatory science

    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery - AOP - nature.com science feeds
    Michel Goldman
    11 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery. doi:10.1038/nrd4520 Authors: Michel Goldman, Nathalie Seigneuret & Hans-Georg Eichler
  • Cancer: Cancer exosomes promote tumorigenesis

    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery - AOP - nature.com science feeds
    Sarah Crunkhorn
    11 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery. doi:10.1038/nrd4514 Author: Sarah Crunkhorn
 
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    Nature - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Keep asking the question

    15 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Keep asking the question Nature 516, 7531 (2014). doi:10.1038/516287a Scientists must push to preserve a small part of a large US survey that provides essential information on the ever-changing scientific workforce.
  • Spin cycle

    16 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Spin cycle Nature 516, 7531 (2014). doi:10.1038/516287b Pressures in all stages of the news-making process can lead to hype in science reporting.
  • Honest brokers

    15 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Honest brokers Nature 516, 7531 (2014). doi:10.1038/516288a Climate negotiations in Lima stumbled on transparency, but there is time to adjust.
  • Challenge the abuse of science in setting policy

    Guillaume Chapron
    16 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Challenge the abuse of science in setting policy Nature 516, 7531 (2014). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/516289a Author: Guillaume Chapron The misuse of wolf research by Swedish politicians should be a warning to all biodiversity scientists, says Guillaume Chapron.
  • Animal behaviour: Fish adopt chemical camouflage

    16 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Animal behaviour: Fish adopt chemical camouflage Nature 516, 7531 (2014). doi:10.1038/516290a A coral-reef fish can match its scent to the odour of the surrounding reef, masking itself from predators.Harlequin filefish (Oxymonacanthus longirostris; pictured) live around reefs in the Pacific and Indian oceans and feed on particular species of coral. A team led by
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  • Orientation columns in the mouse superior colliculus

    Evan H. Feinberg
    16 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 17 December 2014. doi:10.1038/nature14103 Authors: Evan H. Feinberg & Markus Meister More than twenty types of retinal ganglion cells conduct visual information from the eye to the rest of the brain. Each retinal ganglion cell type tessellates the retina in a regular mosaic, so that every point in visual space is processed for visual primitives such as contrast and motion. This information flows to two principal brain centres: the visual cortex and the superior colliculus. The superior colliculus plays an evolutionarily conserved role in visual…
  • Cell biology: On the endocytosis rollercoaster

    Volker Haucke
    16 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 17 December 2014. doi:10.1038/nature14081 Author: Volker Haucke Endocytosis is a process by which molecules gain access to a cell. An unusual mode of endocytosis has now been shown to regulate cell signalling, and to be highjacked by bacterial toxins.
  • Endophilin marks and controls a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway

    Emmanuel Boucrot
    16 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 17 December 2014. doi:10.1038/nature14067 Authors: Emmanuel Boucrot, Antonio P. A. Ferreira, Leonardo Almeida-Souza, Sylvain Debard, Yvonne Vallis, Gillian Howard, Laetitia Bertot, Nathalie Sauvonnet & Harvey T. McMahon
  • Identification of a mast-cell-specific receptor crucial for pseudo-allergic drug reactions

    Benjamin D. McNeil
    16 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 17 December 2014. doi:10.1038/nature14022 Authors: Benjamin D. McNeil, Priyanka Pundir, Sonya Meeker, Liang Han, Bradley J. Undem, Marianna Kulka & Xinzhong Dong Mast cells are primary effectors in allergic reactions, and may have important roles in disease by secreting histamine and various inflammatory and immunomodulatory substances. Although they are classically activated by immunoglobulin (Ig)E antibodies, a unique property of mast cells is their antibody-independent responsiveness to a range of cationic substances, collectively called basic…
  • Endophilin-A2 functions in membrane scission in clathrin-independent endocytosis

    Henri-François Renard
    16 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 17 December 2014. doi:10.1038/nature14064 Authors: Henri-François Renard, Mijo Simunovic, Joël Lemière, Emmanuel Boucrot, Maria Daniela Garcia-Castillo, Senthil Arumugam, Valérie Chambon, Christophe Lamaze, Christian Wunder, Anne K. Kenworthy, Anne A. Schmidt, Harvey T. McMahon, Cécile Sykes, Patricia Bassereau & Ludger Johannes During endocytosis, energy is invested to narrow the necks of cargo-containing plasma membrane invaginations to radii at which the opposing segments spontaneously coalesce, thereby leading to the…
 
 
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    Nature Cell Biology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Gut endoderm takes flight from the wings of mesoderm

    Angela C. H. McDonald
    30 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Cell Biology 16, 1128 (2014). doi:10.1038/ncb3077 Authors: Angela C. H. McDonald & Janet Rossant The endoderm layer destined to be primitive gut is a mosaic of earlier visceral endoderm and definitive endoderm that arises later, during gastrulation. Live imaging now reveals that in mouse embryos, definitive endoderm cells egress from underlying mesoderm and intercalate into the overlying cell layer. This process requires SOX17-mediated control of basement membrane organization.
  • Rsp5/Nedd4 clears cells of heat-damaged proteins

    Thomas Sommer
    30 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Cell Biology 16, 1130 (2014). doi:10.1038/ncb3079 Authors: Thomas Sommer, Annika Weber & Ernst Jarosch Protein quality control systems protect cells from proteotoxicity caused by the accumulation of aberrantly folded polypeptides. The Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase (mammalian homologue Nedd4) is now identified as a major constituent of a clearance pathway that degrades misfolded cytosolic proteins after exposure to heat.
  • Sugar modification inhibits autophagosome–lysosome fusion

    Noboru Mizushima
    30 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Cell Biology 16, 1132 (2014). doi:10.1038/ncb3078 Author: Noboru Mizushima Autophagy is an intracellular degradation system that is mediated by orchestrated functions of membranes and proteins. A genetic screen in Caenorhabditis elegans revealed that O-linked N-acetylglucosamine modification of the SNARE protein SNAP-29 negatively regulates SNARE-dependent fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes. This regulatory mechanism is conserved in mammals.
  • Improving author experience

    30 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Cell Biology 16, 1127 (2014). doi:10.1038/ncb3081 Nature Cell Biology explores avenues to optimize the peer-review process and improve author experience.
  • SOX17 links gut endoderm morphogenesis and germ layer segregation

    Manuel Viotti
    23 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Cell Biology 16, 1146 (2014). doi:10.1038/ncb3070 Authors: Manuel Viotti, Sonja Nowotschin & Anna-Katerina Hadjantonakis
 
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    Nature Chemistry

  • Correction

    16 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry 7, 9 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchem.2149
  • Molecular self-assembly: Searching sequence space

    Ehud Gazit
    16 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry 7, 14 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchem.2140 Author: Ehud Gazit Short peptides are among the most intriguing building blocks in nanotechnology, but it would be very challenging to experimentally study the properties of large numbers of different sequences. Now, a computational analysis of all 8,000 possible tripeptides has been used to identify those with interesting self-assembly behaviour.
  • A molecule with a ring to it

    Michelle Francl
    16 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry 7, 6 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchem.2136 Author: Michelle Francl Michelle Francl wonders what makes benzene resonate with chemists.
  • Natural product biosynthesis: The road to L

    Bryan Jones
    16 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry 7, 11 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchem.2137 Authors: Bryan Jones & Romas J. Kazlauskas A combined experimental and theoretical study of the biosynthesis of a family of antibacterial natural products has uncovered some of the finer details of unusual stereoselectivity observed in a peptide cyclization.
  • Directed metalation: Not just for ortho

    Enda Bergin
    16 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry 7, 8 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchem.2151 Author: Enda Bergin
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    Nature Chemistry

  • Quantitative mapping of zinc fluxes in the mammalian egg reveals the origin of fertilization-induced zinc sparks

    Emily L. Que
    14 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2133 Authors: Emily L. Que, Reiner Bleher, Francesca E. Duncan, Betty Y. Kong, Sophie C. Gleber, Stefan Vogt, Si Chen, Seth A. Garwin, Amanda R. Bayer, Vinayak P. Dravid, Teresa K. Woodruff & Thomas V. O'Halloran The mammalian oocyte cell cycle is regulated by massive zinc fluxes which culminate in coordinated ejections of ~10^10 zinc ions at fertilization. Four single-cell physiochemical approaches (live-cell fluorescence imaging, scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence microscopy and…
  • Copper-catalysed selective hydroamination reactions of alkynes

    Shi-Liang Shi
    14 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2131 Authors: Shi-Liang Shi & Stephen L. Buchwald Amines are essential in a number of research areas, but a general, selective and step-efficient synthesis has been elusive. Now, the use of a single copper catalyst to transform alkynes into enamines, α-chiral branched alkylamines, and linear alkylamines is described. These transformations have been applied in the preparation of a selection of current pharmaceutical agents.
  • Solvating additives drive solution-mediated electrochemistry and enhance toroid growth in non-aqueous Li–O2 batteries

    Nagaphani B. Aetukuri
    14 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2132 Authors: Nagaphani B. Aetukuri, Bryan D. McCloskey, Jeannette M. García, Leslie E. Krupp, Venkatasubramanian Viswanathan & Alan C. Luntz The maximum attainable capacity of the Li–O2 battery is limited by the passivation of its cathode by electronically insulating Li2O2. It is now shown that electrolyte additives, which activate solution-mediated growth of Li2O2, make it possible to circumvent this fundamental limitation, leading to design rules for additive selection.
  • Exploring the sequence space for (tri-)peptide self-assembly to design and discover new hydrogels

    Pim W. J. M. Frederix
    7 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2122 Authors: Pim W. J. M. Frederix, Gary G. Scott, Yousef M. Abul-Haija, Daniela Kalafatovic, Charalampos G. Pappas, Nadeem Javid, Neil T. Hunt, Rein V. Ulijn & Tell Tuttle Peptides that self-assemble into nanostructures are of interest for many applications, including ones relevant to cosmetics, food, biomedicine and nanotechnology. Now, computational tools have been developed that enable peptide sequence space to be rapidly searched for supramolecular properties and this approach has been used to identify unprotected tripeptide hydrogelators.
  • Spatially resolved analysis of short-range structure perturbations in a plastically bent molecular crystal

    Manas K. Panda
    7 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2123 Authors: Manas K. Panda, Soumyajit Ghosh, Nobuhiro Yasuda, Taro Moriwaki, Goutam Dev Mukherjee, C. Malla Reddy & Panče Naumov Crystals of hexachlorobenzene easily break when pressed on the (100) face, but bend to 360° without disintegrating when stress is applied on the (001) face. In the latter case this extraordinary malleability arises from the segregation and sliding of layers of molecules in the crystal, a process in which halogen–halogen interactions are broken and reformed.
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    Nature Genetics - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Cohesin and chromosome loops

    Emily Niemitz
    23 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 46, 1257 (2014). doi:10.1038/ng.3159 Author: Emily Niemitz
  • Single-haplotype genome assembly

    Orli Bahcall
    23 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 46, 1257 (2014). doi:10.1038/ng.3157 Author: Orli Bahcall
  • Predicting protein networks in cancer

    Andrea Califano
    23 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 46, 1252 (2014). doi:10.1038/ng.3156 Author: Andrea Califano Characterization of the mutational landscape of tumors is important to understanding disease etiology but does not provide mechanistic insight into the functional role of specific mutations. A new study introduces a statistical mechanical framework that draws on biophysical data from SH2 domain–phosphoprotein interactions to predict the functional effects of mutations in cancer.
  • Persimmon sex determination

    Brooke LaFlamme
    23 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 46, 1257 (2014). doi:10.1038/ng.3161 Author: Brooke LaFlamme
  • A shared architecture for promoters and enhancers

    Shira Weingarten-Gabbay
    23 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 46, 1253 (2014). doi:10.1038/ng.3152 Authors: Shira Weingarten-Gabbay & Eran Segal A new study detects unstable nascent RNAs and uncovers thousands of transcription initiation sites in promoters and enhancers. Detailed analysis shows that these initiation sites have a similar architecture and that they are differentiated by post-transcriptional regulation rather than transcription initiation.
 
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    Nature Geoscience - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Reply to 'Is sand in the Mississippi River delta a sustainable resource?'

    Jeffrey A. Nittrouer
    26 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience 7, 852 (2014). doi:10.1038/ngeo2311 Authors: Jeffrey A. Nittrouer & Enrica Viparelli
  • The elements of marine life

    Noah J. Planavsky
    26 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience 7, 855 (2014). doi:10.1038/ngeo2307 Author: Noah J. Planavsky Today, the ratio of carbon to nitrogen and phosphorus in marine organic matter is relatively constant. But this ratio probably varied during the Earth's history as a consequence of changes in the phytoplankton community and ocean oxygen levels.
  • Is sand in the Mississippi River delta a sustainable resource?

    M. D. Blum
    26 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience 7, 851 (2014). doi:10.1038/ngeo2310 Authors: M. D. Blum & H. H. Roberts
  • Redfield's evolving legacy

    Nicolas Gruber
    26 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience 7, 853 (2014). doi:10.1038/ngeo2308 Authors: Nicolas Gruber & Curtis A. Deutsch The ratio of nitrogen to phosphorus in organic matter is close to that in seawater, a relationship maintained through a set of biological feedbacks. The rapid delivery of nutrients from human activities may test the efficacy of these processes.
  • Eighty years of Redfield

    26 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience 7, 849 (2014). doi:10.1038/ngeo2319 The outstanding lifespan of the canonical Redfield ratio has shown the power of elemental stoichiometry in describing ocean life. But the biological mechanisms governing this consistency remain unknown.
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    Nature Geoscience - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • Palaeoclimate: Carbon feedbacks on repeat?

    Stephen Grimes
    14 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2337 Author: Stephen Grimes A period of rapid warming about 55.5 million years ago was triggered by a massive release of carbon. The carbon isotope composition of soil nodules provides evidence for a smaller, but still important, carbon release prior to the main event.
  • Significant contribution of combustion-related emissions to the atmospheric phosphorus budget

    Rong Wang
    14 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2324 Authors: Rong Wang, Yves Balkanski, Olivier Boucher, Philippe Ciais, Josep Peñuelas & Shu Tao
  • Two massive, rapid releases of carbon during the onset of the Palaeocene–Eocene thermal maximum

    Gabriel J. Bowen
    14 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2316 Authors: Gabriel J. Bowen, Bianca J. Maibauer, Mary J. Kraus, Ursula Röhl, Thomas Westerhold, Amy Steimke, Philip D. Gingerich, Scott L. Wing & William C. Clyde The Earth’s climate abruptly warmed by 5–8 °C during the Palaeocene–Eocene thermal maximum (PETM), about 55.5 million years ago. This warming was associated with a massive addition of carbon to the ocean–atmosphere system, but estimates of the Earth system response to this perturbation are complicated by widely varying estimates of the duration of…
  • Glacial–interglacial changes in bottom-water oxygen content on the Portuguese margin

    Babette A. A. Hoogakker
    14 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2317 Authors: Babette A. A. Hoogakker, Henry Elderfield, Gerhard Schmiedl, I. Nick McCave & Rosalind E. M. Rickaby During the last and penultimate glacial maxima, atmospheric CO2 concentrations were lower than present, possibly in part because of increased storage of respired carbon in the deep oceans. The amount of respired carbon present in a water mass can be calculated from its oxygen content through apparent oxygen utilization; the oxygen content can in turn be calculated from the carbon isotope gradient within the sediment column. Here we analyse…
  • No growth stimulation of tropical trees by 150 years of CO2 fertilization but water-use efficiency increased

    Peter van der Sleen
    14 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2313 Authors: Peter van der Sleen, Peter Groenendijk, Mart Vlam, Niels P. R. Anten, Arnoud Boom, Frans Bongers, Thijs L. Pons, Gideon Terburg & Pieter A. Zuidema The biomass of undisturbed tropical forests has likely increased in the past few decades, probably as a result of accelerated tree growth. Higher CO2 levels are expected to raise plant photosynthetic rates and enhance water-use efficiency, that is, the ratio of carbon assimilation through photosynthesis to water loss through transpiration. However, there is no evidence that these physiological…
 
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    Nature Immunology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • The balance between protective and pathogenic immune responses in the TB-infected lung

    Ian M Orme
    17 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Immunology 16, 57 (2015). doi:10.1038/ni.3048 Authors: Ian M Orme, Richard T Robinson & Andrea M Cooper
  • Stop the executioners

    Andreas Wack
    17 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Immunology 16, 6 (2015). doi:10.1038/ni.3055 Author: Andreas Wack Virus-triggered type I interferon induces the lysine methyltransferase Setdb2; this then generates repressive histone marks on the promoters of genes encoding molecules important for antibacterial immunity. This process can contribute to influenza virus–associated bacterial superinfection.
  • Antiviral B cell and T cell immunity in the lungs

    Christopher Chiu
    17 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Immunology 16, 18 (2015). doi:10.1038/ni.3056 Authors: Christopher Chiu & Peter J Openshaw
  • A surprising role for TLR7

    Michael M Lederman
    17 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Immunology 16, 8 (2015). doi:10.1038/ni.3051 Author: Michael M Lederman Ligation of the Toll-like receptor TLR7 in human CD4+ T cells elicits an anergic state that may contribute to CD4+ T cell hyporesponsiveness after infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and may also enhance propagation of this virus.
  • Dampening TH1 cells by Mycobacteria

    Zoltan Fehervari
    17 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Immunology 16, 64 (2015). doi:10.1038/ni.3066 Author: Zoltan Fehervari
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    Nature Materials - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Colloidal glasses: Sheared into two flows

    Pep Pàmies
    16 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Materials 14, 13 (2015). doi:10.1038/nmat4189 Author: Pep Pàmies
  • Colloidal phase transitions: A switch for phase shifting

    Ah-Young Jee
    16 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Materials 14, 17 (2015). doi:10.1038/nmat4179 Authors: Ah-Young Jee, Boyce Tsang & Steve Granick Temperature can switch the thermodynamic phase of colloid–polymer mixtures by tipping the balance between competing attractive interactions induced by polymer depletion or adsorption.
  • Programmable self-assembly

    Ludovico Cademartiri
    16 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Materials 14, 2 (2015). doi:10.1038/nmat4184 Authors: Ludovico Cademartiri & Kyle J. M. Bishop Two conceptual strategies for encoding information into self-assembling building blocks highlight opportunities and challenges in the realization of programmable colloidal nanostructures.
  • Crystal–crystal transitions: Mediated by a liquid

    Eduardo Sanz
    16 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Materials 14, 15 (2015). doi:10.1038/nmat4182 Authors: Eduardo Sanz & Chantal Valeriani The nucleation of a crystal within another can involve intermediate liquid nuclei.
  • Order through entropy

    Daan Frenkel
    16 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Materials 14, 9 (2015). doi:10.1038/nmat4178 Author: Daan Frenkel Understanding entropic contributions to common ordering transitions is essential for the design of self-assembling systems with addressable complexity.
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    Nature Materials - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • Valley-selective optical Stark effect in monolayer WS2

    Edbert J. Sie
    14 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4156 Authors: Edbert J. Sie, James W. McIver, Yi-Hsien Lee, Liang Fu, Jing Kong & Nuh Gedik Breaking space–time symmetries in two-dimensional crystals can markedly influence their macroscopic electronic properties. Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are prime examples where the intrinsically broken crystal inversion symmetry permits the generation of valley-selective electron populations, even though the two valleys are energetically degenerate, locked by time-reversal symmetry. Lifting the valley degeneracy in these materials is of great…
  • Soft 3D acoustic metamaterial with negative index

    Thomas Brunet
    14 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4164 Authors: Thomas Brunet, Aurore Merlin, Benoit Mascaro, Kevin Zimny, Jacques Leng, Olivier Poncelet, Christophe Aristégui & Olivier Mondain-Monval Many efforts have been devoted to the design and achievement of negative-refractive-index metamaterials since the 2000s. One of the challenges at present is to extend that field beyond electromagnetism by realizing three-dimensional (3D) media with negative acoustic indices. We report a new class of locally resonant ultrasonic metafluids consisting of a concentrated suspension of macroporous microbeads…
  • Negative capacitance in a ferroelectric capacitor

    Asif Islam Khan
    14 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4148 Authors: Asif Islam Khan, Korok Chatterjee, Brian Wang, Steven Drapcho, Long You, Claudy Serrao, Saidur Rahman Bakaul, Ramamoorthy Ramesh & Sayeef Salahuddin The Boltzmann distribution of electrons poses a fundamental barrier to lowering energy dissipation in conventional electronics, often termed as Boltzmann Tyranny. Negative capacitance in ferroelectric materials, which stems from the stored energy of a phase transition, could provide a solution, but a direct measurement of negative capacitance has so far been elusive. Here, we report the…
  • Light-triggered in vivo activation of adhesive peptides regulates cell adhesion, inflammation and vascularization of biomaterials

    Ted T. Lee
    14 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4157 Authors: Ted T. Lee, José R. García, Julieta I. Paez, Ankur Singh, Edward A. Phelps, Simone Weis, Zahid Shafiq, Asha Shekaran, Aránzazu del Campo & Andrés J. García
  • Coexistence of superconductivity and antiferromagnetism in (Li0.8Fe0.2)OHFeSe

    X. F. Lu
    14 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4155 Authors: X. F. Lu, N. Z. Wang, H. Wu, Y. P. Wu, D. Zhao, X. Z. Zeng, X. G. Luo, T. Wu, W. Bao, G. H. Zhang, F. Q. Huang, Q. Z. Huang & X. H. Chen
 
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    Nature Medicine - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • The Yearbook

    Manasi Vaidya
    3 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Medicine 20, 1365 (2014). doi:10.1038/nm1214-1365 Authors: Manasi Vaidya & Shraddha Chakradhar Our list of newsmakers this year includes a range of nonconformists, from a scientist advocating population-wide genetic tests to a doctor who caused a stir while waiting for takeout food.
  • IL-18 is not therapeutic for neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Yoshio Hirano
    3 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Medicine 20, 1372 (2014). doi:10.1038/nm.3671 Authors: Yoshio Hirano, Tetsuhiro Yasuma, Takeshi Mizutani, Benjamin J Fowler, Valeria Tarallo, Reo Yasuma, Younghee Kim, Ana Bastos-Carvalho, Nagaraj Kerur, Bradley D Gelfand, Sasha Bogdanovich, Shikun He, Xiaohui Zhang, Miho Nozaki, Ryo Ijima, Hiroki Kaneko, Yuichiro Ogura, Hiroko Terasaki, Hiroshi Nagai, Isao Haro, Gabriel Núñez, Balamurali K Ambati, David R Hinton & Jayakrishna Ambati
  • Advances in marmoset and mouse models buoy Ebola research

    Cassandra Willyard
    3 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Medicine 20, 1356 (2014). doi:10.1038/nm1214-1356 Author: Cassandra Willyard
  • Notable advances 2014

    Amanda Keener
    3 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Medicine 20, 1368 (2014). doi:10.1038/nm1214-1368 Author: Amanda Keener This year's most notable research included studies that opened new avenues for regenerative medicine, paved the way to editing out vulnerability to disease and unraveled the genetic complexities underlying diseases such as leukemia and schizophrenia. Here are some of the papers that captured our attention and moved their fields forward in 2014.
  • Europe seeks to streamline drug evaluations in its member states

    Katharine Sanderson
    3 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Medicine 20, 1357 (2014). doi:10.1038/nm1214-1357 Author: Katharine Sanderson
 
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    Nature Nanotechnology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Our choice from the recent literature

    2 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 9, 957 (2014). doi:10.1038/nnano.2014.300
  • The promise and challenge of nanostructured solar cells

    Matthew C. Beard
    2 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 9, 951 (2014). doi:10.1038/nnano.2014.292 Authors: Matthew C. Beard, Joseph M. Luther & Arthur J. Nozik Nanoscale objects provide opportunities to revolutionize the conversion of solar energy by enabling highly efficient and low-cost devices. Challenges associated with demonstrating high efficiency and stability are now being addressed in the research community.
  • Molecular electronics: A DNA that conducts

    Elke Scheer
    2 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 9, 960 (2014). doi:10.1038/nnano.2014.293 Author: Elke Scheer Experiments with conducting atomic force microscopy provide a clear demonstration of long-range charge transport in G-quadruplex DNA molecules, and allow a hopping transport model to be developed that could also be applied to other conductive polymers.
  • Could we 3D print an artificial mind?

    Andrew D. Maynard
    2 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 9, 955 (2014). doi:10.1038/nnano.2014.294 Author: Andrew D. Maynard 3D printing is allowing more complex three-dimensional structures to be manufactured than ever before. Could the convergence between this technology and nanotechnology eventually usher in a new era of artificial intelligence, asks Andrew D. Maynard.
  • Cancer biomarkers: Detected twice for good measure

    Giovanni Longo
    2 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 9, 959 (2014). doi:10.1038/nnano.2014.289 Author: Giovanni Longo A two-step sandwich assay, which can be both mechanically and optically detected, identifies cancer biomarkers in serum with high sensitivity and selectivity.
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    Nature Neuroscience - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Paul Fatt 1924–2014

    Stuart Cull-Candy
    20 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 17, 1634 (2014). doi:10.1038/nn.3873 Authors: Stuart Cull-Candy & Jonathan Ashmore
  • Flavanol-rich food for thought

    Judy Pa
    20 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 17, 1624 (2014). doi:10.1038/nn.3876 Authors: Judy Pa & Adam Gazzaley A randomized clinical trial in older adults shows that high dietary intake of cocoa flavanols enhances memory performance on an object-recognition task and neural activity as assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, a region that is critical for learning and memory.
  • Cortical geography is destiny

    Charles E Connor
    20 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 17, 1631 (2014). doi:10.1038/nn.3877 Author: Charles E Connor A study demonstrates that learning different character sets produces a repeatable arrangement of distinct cortical modules, suggesting that a preexisting cortical architecture is repurposed during learning.
  • Reading dendritic activity with gap junctions

    Frederic Lanore
    20 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 17, 1625 (2014). doi:10.1038/nn.3880 Authors: Frederic Lanore & R Angus Silver Patch-clamp recordings and imaging in retina show that electrical synapses between dendrites of neighboring ganglion cells transform spatial patterns of light activated synaptic input into a temporal population code.
  • Replay to remember: a boost from dopamine

    Laura A Ewell
    20 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 17, 1629 (2014). doi:10.1038/nn.3875 Authors: Laura A Ewell & Stefan Leutgeb A study links transient activation of the brain's reward system during a novel experience to frequent reactivation of memory traces during sleep and shows that artificial activation of the reward circuit can strengthen memories.
 
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    Nature Photonics - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Black holes: On the lab table

    Maria Maragkou
    26 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Photonics 8, 881 (2014). doi:10.1038/nphoton.2014.296 Author: Maria Maragkou
  • Nanophotonics is big

    26 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Photonics 8, 878 (2014). doi:10.1038/nphoton.2014.281 Nature Photonics spoke to Pierre Berini — pioneer of plasmon waveguides — to get some perspective on how nanophotonics has evolved over the past decade and where it is heading.
  • Optical computing: The optical Ising machine

    Claude Fabre
    26 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Photonics 8, 883 (2014). doi:10.1038/nphoton.2014.292 Author: Claude Fabre A network of optical parametric oscillators has been harnessed to find solutions to a complex problem in statistical physics that is difficult to solve using numerical computing algorithms.
  • Optical fibres: Silicon engineering

    Maria Maragkou
    26 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Photonics 8, 880 (2014). doi:10.1038/nphoton.2014.295 Author: Maria Maragkou
  • Sensors: Nanoscale magnetometer

    Noriaki Horiuchi
    26 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Photonics 8, 881 (2014). doi:10.1038/nphoton.2014.302 Author: Noriaki Horiuchi
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    Nature Physics - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Shall we dance

    Iulia Georgescu
    27 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics 10, 899 (2014). doi:10.1038/nphys3190 Author: Iulia Georgescu
  • Edgy magnetism

    Bart Verberck
    27 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics 10, 899 (2014). doi:10.1038/nphys3188 Author: Bart Verberck
  • A new frontier for superconductivity

    Ivan Bozovic
    27 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics 10, 892 (2014). doi:10.1038/nphys3177 Authors: Ivan Bozovic & Charles Ahn Monolayer films of iron selenide deposited on strontium titanate display signatures of superconductivity at temperatures as high as 109 K. These recent developments may herald a flurry of exciting findings concerning superconductivity at interfaces.
  • Through the looking glass

    Abigail Klopper
    27 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics 10, 899 (2014). doi:10.1038/nphys3192 Author: Abigail Klopper
  • Counting the cost of irreversibility

    Mark Buchanan
    27 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics 10, 896 (2014). doi:10.1038/nphys3176 Author: Mark Buchanan
 
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    Nature Physics - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • Spatial variation of a giant spin–orbit effect induces electron confinement in graphene on Pb islands

    Fabian Calleja
    14 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3173 Authors: Fabian Calleja, Héctor Ochoa, Manuela Garnica, Sara Barja, Juan Jesús Navarro, Andrés Black, Mikhail M. Otrokov, Evgueni V. Chulkov, Andrés Arnau, Amadeo L. Vázquez de Parga, Francisco Guinea & Rodolfo Miranda The electronic band structure of a material can acquire interesting topological properties in the presence of a magnetic field or as a result of the spin–orbit coupling. We study graphene on Ir, with Pb monolayer islands intercalated between the graphene sheet and the Ir surface. Although the graphene…
  • Molecular physics: Subradiance spectroscopy

    Benjamin Pasquiou
    14 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3208 Author: Benjamin Pasquiou Subradiant states have remained elusive since their prediction sixty years ago, but they have now been uncovered in ultracold molecules, where they could prove useful for ultra-high precision spectroscopy.
  • Increasing the elastic modulus of graphene by controlled defect creation

    Guillermo López-Polín
    14 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3183 Authors: Guillermo López-Polín, Cristina Gómez-Navarro, Vincenzo Parente, Francisco Guinea, Mikhail I. Katsnelson, Francesc Pérez-Murano & Julio Gómez-Herrero The extraordinary strength, stiffness and lightness of graphene have generated great expectations of its application in flexible electronics and as a mechanical reinforcement agent. However, the presence of lattice defects, unavoidable in sheets obtained by scalable routes, might degrade its mechanical properties. Here we report a systematic study on the elastic…
  • Precise study of asymptotic physics with subradiant ultracold molecules

    B. H. McGuyer
    14 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3182 Authors: B. H. McGuyer, M. McDonald, G. Z. Iwata, M. G. Tarallo, W. Skomorowski, R. Moszynski & T. Zelevinsky Weakly bound molecules have physical properties without atomic analogues, even as the bond length approaches dissociation. For instance, the internal symmetries of homonuclear diatomic molecules result in the formation of two-body superradiant and subradiant excited states. Whereas superradiance has been demonstrated in a variety of systems, subradiance is more elusive owing to the inherently weak interaction with the environment. Here we…
  • Stiffening solids with liquid inclusions

    Robert W. Style
    14 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3181 Authors: Robert W. Style, Rostislav Boltyanskiy, Benjamin Allen, Katharine E. Jensen, Henry P. Foote, John S. Wettlaufer & Eric R. Dufresne
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    Nature Reviews Cancer - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Microenvironment: Small containers, important cargo

    M. Teresa Villanueva
    23 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 14, 764 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrc3864 Author: M. Teresa Villanueva Two papers have revealed new roles of exosomes in cancer progression: as mediators of therapeutic resistance signals from the stroma and as microRNA generators.
  • Therapeutic resistance: Blocking the gatekeeper

    Sarah Seton-Rogers
    23 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 14, 766 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrc3871 Author: Sarah Seton-Rogers Tan et al. have identified covalent inhibitors of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) that can block the proliferation of cells expressing FGFR1 or FGFR2 gatekeeper mutants, which are resistant to the first generation FGFR inhibitors that are being tested clinically for a variety
  • Cell signalling: Migration fizzles out

    Tesi Villanueva
    23 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 14, 767 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrc3872 Author: Tesi Villanueva Uncovering the signalling pathways by which growth factors regulate epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) could guide the development of new therapies for cancer metastasis. Gujral et al. found that the WNT receptor Frizzled 2 (FZD2) and its ligands WNT5a and WNT5b are elevated in human samples
  • Hypermutation in human cancer genomes: footprints and mechanisms

    Steven A. Roberts
    23 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 14, 786 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrc3816 Authors: Steven A. Roberts & Dmitry A. Gordenin A role for somatic mutations in carcinogenesis is well accepted, but the degree to which mutation rates influence cancer initiation and development is under continuous debate. Recently accumulated genomic data have revealed that thousands of tumour samples are riddled by hypermutation, broadening support for the
  • Aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligands in cancer: friend and foe

    Iain A. Murray
    23 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 14, 801 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrc3846 Authors: Iain A. Murray, Andrew D. Patterson & Gary H. Perdew The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is best known for mediating the toxicity and tumour-promoting properties of the carcinogen 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, commonly referred to as 'dioxin'. AHR influences the major stages of tumorigenesis — initiation, promotion, progression and metastasis
 
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    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • New drugs cost US$2.6 billion to develop

    Asher Mullard
    30 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 13, 877 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrd4507 Author: Asher Mullard The cost of drug development, including the price of failure and the opportunity cost, has more than doubled in the past decade, shows a Tufts study.The lowdown: A widely cited 2003 study estimated that new drugs cost on average around US$800 million (in
  • Breakthrough programme turns two

    Asher Mullard
    30 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 13, 873 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrd4487 Author: Asher Mullard The breakthrough designation cohort shows no signs of slowed growth, as the FDA grants 'all-hands-on-deck' attention to a total of 68 therapeutics.
  • Phase III setback for lead angiopoietin inhibitor

    Asher Mullard
    30 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 13, 877 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrd4509 Author: Asher Mullard Amgen and Takeda's trebananib peptibody missed its overall survival end point in a pivotal ovarian cancer trial, despite promising signals of progression-free survival.The lowdown: Anti-angiogenesis drugs like Genentech/Roche's blockbuster bevacizumab — an antibody that inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) — offer efficacy
  • Drug discoverers chart path to tackling data irreproducibility

    Elie Dolgin
    30 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 13, 875 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrd4488 Author: Elie Dolgin Researchers from across the biomedical research community met in October to discuss solutions to the 'irreproducibility epidemic', which has been re-emphasized by new data from Novartis and Sigma-Aldrich.
  • European regulators approve first PARP inhibitor

    Asher Mullard
    30 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 13, 877 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrd4508 Author: Asher Mullard But a US regulatory decision is still pending for AstraZeneca's olaparib.The lowdown: In 2011 and 2012, a series of clinical trial failures threatened poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors — which modulate the repair of DNA damage — with extinction. Not only did Sanofi's
 
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    Nature Reviews Genetics - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Development: Cell fate decisions in mammalian embryogenesis

    Linda Koch
    17 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 5 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg3882 Author: Linda Koch Using single-cell RNA sequencing, researchers have analysed global gene expression in mouse embryos at multiple defined stages of development. In support of the 'asymmetric hypothesis', Biase et al. found that the individual cells in two-cell and four-cell embryos are not equivalent and that non-trivial,
  • Microbial genetics: Horizontal gene transfer of antibacterial genes

    Linda Koch
    17 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 5 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg3880 Author: Linda Koch Horizontally transferred genes with wide-ranging antibacterial properties may prove useful as new sources of antibiotic drugs, a study in eLife suggests. Metcalf et al. identified a bacterial lysozyme gene family with an unprecedented spread through horizontal gene transfer across the tree of life
  • Technology: DNase Hi-C — pitch-perfect chromatin mapping?

    Linda Koch
    17 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 5 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg3881 Author: Linda Koch Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a new high-throughput method to map chromatin interactions genome-wide. Named DNase Hi-C, this methodology uses DNase I for chromatin fragmentation, thus overcoming limitations on efficiency and resolution imposed on previous methods such as conventional Hi-C, which uses
  • Epigenetics: Dad's diet controls offspring phenotype

    Linda Koch
    8 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 2 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg3878 Author: Linda Koch Using a fly model of paternally induced obesity, Öst et al. show that acute changes in paternal diet — as short as 24 hours — reprogram offspring metabolism without affecting growth and development. Paternal intergenerational metabolic reprogramming altered chromatin states and gene expression in
  • RNA: New CLIP pipeline improves interactome discovery

    Linda Koch
    8 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 2 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg3877 Author: Linda Koch A novel experimental and computational crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) workflow called FAST-iCLIP (fully automated and standardized iCLIP), which reduces experimental time by ~50%, promises to improve research into RNA–protein interactions across human and pathogen RNAs. The researchers' aim was to address common limitations of CLIP
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    Nature Reviews Immunology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Infectious disease: Fungal restriction of renal T cell migration

    Olive Leavy
    24 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 14, 779 (2014). doi:10.1038/nri3782 Author: Olive Leavy Although CD4+ T cells, particularly T helper 17 (TH17) cells, have a crucial role in antifungal immunity, it has been thought that T cells are redundant for the control of renal Candida albicans infection. Drummond et al. characterized the
  • Innate immunity: IFNs lead TLR4 responses down the TRIF path

    Yvonne Bordon
    24 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 14, 779 (2014). doi:10.1038/nri3783 Author: Yvonne Bordon Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signals via two distinct pathways — one engages the adaptor protein MYD88 and the other is driven by TRIF. The MYD88 pathway is associated with the induction of pro-inflammatory gene expression, whereas the TRIF pathway is considered to be less inflammatory
  • Antiviral immunity: Whipping up a remedy for rotavirus infection

    Yvonne Bordon
    24 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 14, 777 (2014). doi:10.1038/nri3780 Author: Yvonne Bordon Rotavirus infection is a major cause of gastroenteritis and 600,000 infants die from this infection each year. This study shows that treatment with bacterial flagellin can protect mice against subsequent infection with rotavirus and promote the clearance of this virus from chronically infected mice. Flagellin
  • Immunity in Drosophila melanogaster — from microbial recognition to whole-organism physiology

    Nicolas Buchon
    24 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 14, 796 (2014). doi:10.1038/nri3763 Authors: Nicolas Buchon, Neal Silverman & Sara Cherry Since the discovery of antimicrobial peptide responses 40 years ago, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has proven to be a powerful model for the study of innate immunity. Early work focused on innate immune mechanisms of microbial recognition and subsequent nuclear factor-κB signal transduction.
  • Immune tolerance: Regulatory T cells require constant reassurance

    Yvonne Bordon
    24 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 14, 777 (2014). doi:10.1038/nri3778 Author: Yvonne Bordon Regulatory T (TReg) cells require T cell receptor (TCR) signalling for their development, but it has been unclear how TCR signals contribute to their functions in the periphery. Vahl et al. used an inducible deletion system to specifically ablate TCR expression on
 
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    Nature Reviews Microbiology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Symbiosis: Vibrio genes involved in squid colonization

    Cláudio Nunes-Alves
    7 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 3 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3414 Author: Cláudio Nunes-Alves One of the best-studied examples of symbiosis is the colonization of the light organ of the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, by the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Now, Brooks et al. have carried out a forward genetic screen to identify bacterial factors
  • Fungal pathogenesis: Good cop(per), bad cop(per)

    Cláudio Nunes-Alves
    7 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 3 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3413 Author: Cláudio Nunes-Alves Copper is required for virulence of the fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, but an excess of this metal can have an antimicrobial effect. Interestingly, C. neoformans must disseminate from the lungs (which have high copper levels) to the brain (which has low copper levels) where
  • Viral pathogenesis: Ebola virus' shed GP activates immune cells

    Cláudio Nunes-Alves
    7 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 3 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3412 Author: Cláudio Nunes-Alves Cells infected with Ebola virus (EBOV) release large amounts of viral glycoproteins; however, how these proteins contribute to pathogenesis is unknown. Now, Escudero-Pérez et al. show that one of these proteins, termed shed GP, binds to uninfected dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages, in a
  • Bacterial toxins: When GENErosity backfires

    Christina Tobin Kåhrström
    7 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 2 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3416 Author: Christina Tobin Kåhrström Two studies report that two distinct families of antibacterial genes have been transferred to, and are functional in, eukaryotic and archaeal hosts.
  • Gain-of-function experiments: time for a real debate

    W. Paul Duprex
    7 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 58 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3405 Authors: W. Paul Duprex, Ron A. M. Fouchier, Michael J. Imperiale, Marc Lipsitch & David A. Relman According to the WHO, dual use research of concern (DURC) is “life sciences research that is intended for benefit, but which might easily be misapplied to do harm”. Recent studies, particularly those on influenza viruses, have led to renewed attention on DURC, as there is
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    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Remodelling the extracellular matrix in development and disease

    Caroline Bonnans
    20 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 15, 786 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrm3904 Authors: Caroline Bonnans, Jonathan Chou & Zena Werb The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a highly dynamic structure that is present in all tissues and continuously undergoes controlled remodelling. This process involves quantitative and qualitative changes in the ECM, mediated by specific enzymes that are responsible for ECM degradation, such as metalloproteinases. The ECM
  • Chromosome biology: Short telomeres can't reach

    Eytan Zlotorynski
    20 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 15, 766 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrm3914 Author: Eytan Zlotorynski Robin et al. describe telomere position effect over long distances (TPE–OLD), a phenomenon in which long (but not short) telomeres control gene expression by forming chromatin loops with genes located several Mb away.
  • Microscopy: Advancing imaging

    Andrea Du Toit
    20 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 15, 769 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrm3910 Author: Andrea Du Toit Betzig and colleagues created ultrathin light sheets to visualize dynamic processes at high speed and high spatiotemporal resolution.
  • Cell migration: Moving towards ECM with LKB1

    Katharine H. Wrighton
    20 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 15, 767 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrm3911 Author: Katharine H. Wrighton Chan et al. investigated the mechanism by which loss of the Ser/Thr kinase LKB1 facilitates the invasion and metastasis of melanoma cells. Using scratch wound assays, which remove the extracellular matrix (ECM), they found that LKB1 null melanoma cells migrated into the wound, but
  • Cell adhesion: Basement membranes stick together

    Kim Baumann
    20 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 15, 767 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrm3912 Author: Kim Baumann The basement membrane is a specialized sheet-like extracellular matrix (ECM) that surrounds most tissues. The mechanisms underlying adhesion between basement membranes, which is important for neighbouring tissue alignment, are unclear. Studying Caenorhabditis elegans uterine–vulval attachments, Morrissey et al. found that the ECM component
 
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    Nature Reviews Cardiology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Atherosclerosis: Low-dose aspirin failed to improve cardiovascular outcomes

    Karina Huynh
    1 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 12, 3 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2014.194 Author: Karina Huynh Low-dose aspirin therapy can reduce severe adverse vascular events. Investigators in the Japanese Primary Prevention Project sought to determine whether low-dose aspirin therapy can reduce the incidence of atherosclerotic events in Japanese patients with multiple risk factors for atherosclerosis.The investigators enrolled 14,464 patients aged
  • Atherosclerosis: Cholesterol efflux capacity—a new biomarker for cardiovascular risk?

    João H. Duarte
    1 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 12, 2 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2014.198 Author: João H. Duarte HDL cholesterol efflux capacity, a measure of reverse cholesterol transport, is inversely associated with the incidence of cardiovascular events. This finding by Rohatgi and colleagues published in The New England Journal of Medicine was also presented at the AHA Scientific Sessions 2014 in Chicago,
  • Coronary heart disease: NPC1L1 mutations lower CHD risk

    Tim Geach
    1 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 12, 3 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2014.202 Author: Tim Geach Individuals with a naturally-occurring heterozygous mutation in NPC1L1, a gene that encodes the Niemann–Pick C1-like 1 protein, have a lower plasma LDL-cholesterol level and a reduced risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) compared with noncarriers. These findings, from the Myocardial Infarction Genetics Consortium investigators,
  • Atrial fibrillation: AF management—SAFETY first?

    Tim Geach
    1 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 12, 2 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2014.199 Author: Tim Geach Patients who receive a course of home-based management tailored for atrial fibrillation (AF) have fewer days in hospital compared with those receiving standard therapy according to investigators presenting their findings at the AHA Scientific Sessions 2014 in Chicago, IL, USA. The results of the standard
  • Coronary artery disease: Durable-polymer drug-eluting stents might not lead to very late stent thrombosis

    João H. Duarte
    1 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 12, 3 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2014.201 Author: João H. Duarte Biodegradable polymer-coated drug-eluting stents (BP-DES) have similar efficacy and safety to durable-polymer drug-eluting stents (DP-DES) according to investigators presenting their findings at the AHA Scientific Sessions 2014 in Chicago, IL, USA.In the randomized BASKET-PROVE II study, 2,291 participants with acute or stable coronary artery
 
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    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • The little C

    Mina Razzak
    23 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 11, 689 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2014.176 Author: Mina Razzak A cancer diagnosis is life changing at any age, but a diagnosis at a young age can alter an individual's life path completely. A child thrown into the world of hospitals, tests and treatments also opens technical challenges from the medical perspective—dosing issues, preservation of
  • Breast cancer: Paradoxical role of angiogenesis in breast cancer metastasis

    10 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 11, 682 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2014.197 The tumour microenvironment has a key role in cancer growth. A high number of macrophages is associated with poor patient prognosis and survival, and with high expression levels of the chemoattractant CCL2. Inhibition of CCL2 reduces metastasis in mice; however, a study has now shown
  • Gastrointestinal cancer: FOLFOXIRI—improving outcomes of metastatic colorectal cancer

    Alessia Errico
    10 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 11, 684 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2014.194 Author: Alessia Errico Firstline bevacizumab plus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), folinic acid and either irinotecan (FOLFIRI) or oxaliplatin (FOLFOX), are widely adopted treatment regimens for metastatic colorectal cancer. Now, the TRIBE trial, led by Alfredo Falcone, has shown that FOLFOXIRI (5-FU plus folinic acid, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan) plus bevacizumab improves
  • Genetics: The Cancer Genome Atlas maps papillary thyroid cancer

    David Killock
    10 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 11, 681 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2014.193 Author: David Killock The most-common form of thyroid cancer is papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), the incidence of which is increasing. Although PTC generally has a good prognosis, with 5-year survival often exceeding 95%, some cases dedifferentiate into more-aggressive tumours. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have turned
  • Immunotherapy: Treatment of aggressive lymphomas with anti-CD19 CAR T cells

    Christopher A. Klebanoff
    10 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 11, 685 (2014). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2014.190 Authors: Christopher A. Klebanoff, Tori N. Yamamoto & Nicholas P. Restifo Adoptive immunotherapy using T cells genetically engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor that targets CD19, a B-cell differentiation antigen, has demonstrated impressive efficacy in a range of B-lymphoid malignancies. The latest results demonstrate the potential of this approach in patients with chemotherapy-refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
 
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    Nature Reviews Endocrinology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Diabetes: Acinar-cell reprogramming generates functional β cells that persist for a long time

    David Holmes
    1 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Endocrinology 11, 1 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrendo.2014.213 Author: David Holmes Regeneration of β cells has long been a goal for the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus—an autoimmune disease that results in loss of insulin-producing β cells. A new study published in Nature Biotechnology shows that induced pancreatic β cells, which were generated by
  • Genetics: Vitamin D and type 2 diabetes mellitus—hype or hope?

    Klaus Badenhoop
    24 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Endocrinology 11, 10 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrendo.2014.206 Author: Klaus Badenhoop Vitamin D deficiency is a global health concern, which might affect the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. Previous studies suggest vitamin D has some potential in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. A new combined genetic study and meta-analysis reveals conflicting results regarding the effects of circulating levels of vitamin D on type 2 diabetes mellitus risk.
  • Cardiovascular endocrinology: Growth hormone in CVD prediction—a tall order?

    Connie W. Tsao
    17 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Endocrinology 11, 11 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrendo.2014.204 Authors: Connie W. Tsao & Ramachandran S. Vasan Endocrine and metabolic pathways are a rich ground in which to examine the prognostic significance of biomarkers of cardiovascular risk. Whereas numerous biomarkers for prediction of cardiovascular disease have emerged in the past decade, far fewer have transitioned into clinical practice. Will growth hormone fulfill its potential?
  • Therapy: PCSK9 inhibitors for treating familial hypercholesterolaemia

    Hiroshi Mabuchi
    17 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Endocrinology 11, 8 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrendo.2014.205 Authors: Hiroshi Mabuchi & Atsushi Nohara Familial hypercholesterolaemia is caused by mutations in genes that code for proteins involved in cholesterol metabolism. Patients heterozygous for mutations in LDLR respond to statin treatment, whereas individuals with homozygous LDLR mutations do not. PCSK9 inhibitors have been developed for treating familial hypercholesterolaemia, and results are promising for patients with either heterozygous or homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia.
  • Therapy: Low-dose aspirin to reduce the risk of pre-eclampsia?

    Baha M. Sibai
    17 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Endocrinology 11, 6 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrendo.2014.199 Author: Baha M. Sibai Numerous studies have evaluated the use of low-dose aspirin (LDA) to reduce rates of pre-eclampsia and adverse perinatal outcomes in women considered at risk of pre-eclampsia. A new study recommends that these women should receive LDA after 12 weeks of gestation to reduce the rates of pre-eclampsia, preterm birth and fetal growth restriction.
 
 
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    Naturejobs - Search results

  • Environmental Compliance and Resource Management Technician

    18 Dec 2014 | 9:02 am
    POSITION An Environmental Compliance and Resource Management Technician (Research Associate I Special) position is available with the Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands (CEMML). This position is located at the CEMML office in Fort Collins, Colorado. ORGANIZATIONCEMML is a research, education and service unit within the Warner College of Natural Resources at Colorado State University (CSU). CEMML applies the latest and most appropriate science to promote the sustainable …
  • Executive Director-Neuroscience Institute/Chair of the Department of Biomedical Science

    18 Dec 2014 | 8:43 am
    Florida Atlantic University is seeking a dynamic leader and highly accomplished scientist to serve as the inaugural Executive Director for a new University-wide neuroscience institute as well as Chair of the Department of Biomedical Science in FAU's Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine. As Executive Director for a new trans-campus neuroscience institute, this position will lead the interdisciplinary program and hold a tenured faculty position. The Executive Director will work closely …
  • Senior Medical Writer - Oncology

    18 Dec 2014 | 8:43 am
    Articulate Science is an international medical communications agency. Our reputation for delivering high-quality and creative communication solutions is founded on the scientific expertise, strategic understanding and motivation of our staff. As we are part of Nucleus Global, our clients benefit from synergies across our network of offices spanning the US, Europe and Asia Pacific regions. We offer an unrivalled integrated approach to medical communications across the globe. Our success has le…
  • Senior Medical Writer - Oncology

    18 Dec 2014 | 8:40 am
    Articulate Science is an international medical communications agency. Our reputation for delivering high-quality and creative communication solutions is founded on the scientific expertise, strategic understanding and motivation of our staff. As we are part of Nucleus Global, our clients benefit from synergies across our network of offices spanning the US, Europe and Asia Pacific regions. We offer an unrivalled integrated approach to medical communications across the globe. Our success has le…
  • Senior Medical Writer

    18 Dec 2014 | 8:37 am
    Articulate Science is an international medical communications agency. Our reputation for delivering high-quality and creative communication solutions is founded on the scientific expertise, strategic understanding and motivation of our staff. As we are part of Nucleus Global, our clients benefit from synergies across our network of offices spanning the US, Europe and Asia Pacific regions. We offer an unrivalled integrated approach to medical communications across the globe. Our success has le…
 
 
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    British Journal of Pharmacology

  • 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) reverses beta amyloid-induced LTP deficit through blocking BAX and caspase-3 hyperactivation

    Wei-Yan Hu, Zhi-Yong He, Lu-Jun Yang, Ming Zhang, Da Xing, Zhi-Cheng Xiao
    17 Dec 2014 | 8:29 pm
    Abstract Background and purposeAt the early stage of Alzheimer’ Disease (AD), the accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) oligomers disturbs intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and disrupts synaptic plasticity of brain neurons. How to prevent Aβ-induced synaptic failure remains an unsolved obstacle for the therapeutics of AD. In this study, the effects of 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), a nonspecific but moderately potent Ca2+ channel inhibitor, on Aβ-induced deficit of synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) and the underlying molecular mechanisms were explored. Experimental…
  • The A6V polymorphism of the human μ-opioid receptor negatively impacts signalling of morphine and endogenous opioids in vitro

    Alisa Knapman, Marina Santiago, Mark Connor
    17 Dec 2014 | 8:28 pm
    Summary Background and PurposePolymorphisms of the μ-opioid receptor (MOPr) may contribute to the variation in responses to opioid drugs in clinical and unregulated situations. The A6V variant of MOPr (MOPr-A6V) is present in up to 20% of individuals in some populations, and may be associated with heightened susceptibility to drug abuse. There are no functional studies examining the acute signalling of MOPr-A6V in vitro, so we investigated potential functional differences between MOPr and MOPr-A6V at several signalling pathways using structurally distinct opioid ligands. Experimental…
  • The catalytic topoisomerase II inhibitor dexrazoxane induces DNA breaks, ATF3 and the DNA damage response in cancer cells

    Shiwei Deng, Tiandong Yan, Teodora Nikolova, Dominik Fuhrmann, Andrea Nemecek, Ute Gödtel-Armbrust, Bernd Kaina, Leszek Wojnowski
    17 Dec 2014 | 8:28 pm
    Abstract Background and purposeThe catalytic topoisomerase II inhibitor dexrazoxane (DRZ) has been associated not only with improved cancer patient survival, but also with secondary malignancies and reduced tumor response. Experimental approachWe investigated the DNA damage response and the role of the activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) accumulation in tumor cells exposed to DRZ. Key resultsDRZ exposure resulted in topoisomerase IIα (TOP2A)-dependent cell death, γ-H2AX accumulation, and increased tail moment in neutral comet assays. DRZ induced DNA damage response, as evidenced by…
  • Synergistic antitumor effects of tetrandrine and chloroquine combination therapy in human cancer: a potential antagonistic role for p21

    Liufeng Mei, Yicheng Chen, Zhimeng Wang, Jian Wang, Jiali Wan, Chunrong Yu, Xin Liu, Wenhua Li
    17 Dec 2014 | 8:28 pm
    Abstract Background and PurposeTetrandrine, a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from the Chinese medicinal herb Stephaniae tetrandrae, has a long history in Chinese clinical applications to treat diverse diseases. We previously demonstrated that at the proper concentration, tetrandrine has potential as a cancer chemotherapeutic agent able to induce cell apoptosis or autophagy of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Experimental approachWe found that the 4-aminoquinoline drug chloroquine (CQ), which is widely used to prevent or treat malaria and other diseases, showed a synergistic…
  • Selective Activation of At2 Receptor Attenuates Progression of Pulmonary Hypertension and Inhibits Cardiopulmonary Fibrosis

    E Bruce, V Shenoy, A Rathinasabapathy, A Espejo, A Horowitz, A Oswalt, J Francis, A Nair, T Unger, M K Raizada, U M Steckelings, C Sumners, M J Katovich
    17 Dec 2014 | 8:27 pm
    Summary Background and PurposePulmonary hypertension (PH) is a devastating disease characterized by increased pulmonary arterial pressure, which progressively leads to right heart failure and death. A dysregulated renin angiotensin system (RAS) has been implicated in the development and progression of PH. However, the role of the angiotensin type II receptor (AT2 receptor) in PH has not been fully elucidated. We have taken advantage of a recently identified non-peptide AT2 receptor agonist, Compound 21 (C21), to investigate its effects on the well-established monocrotaline (MCT) rat model of…
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    PSI-Nature Structural Biology Knowledgebase

  • HIV/AIDS: Slide to Enter

    Jennifer Cable
    17 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    PSI-Nature Structural Biology Knowledgebase (2015). doi:10.1038/sbkb.2014.238 Author: Jennifer Cable A sliding hinge in gp41 promotes HIV membrane fusion and viral infection.
  • HIV/AIDS: Pre-fusion Env Exposed

    Irene Jarchum
    17 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    PSI-Nature Structural Biology Knowledgebase (2015). doi:10.1038/sbkb.2014.239 Author: Irene Jarchum A crystal structure of the pre-fusion HIV-1 Env captures gp41 and provides insights into immune recognition.
  • Probing the protein structure-ome

    Allison Doerr
    29 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods 11, 1088 (2015). doi:10.1038/nmeth.3163 Author: Allison Doerr Protein structure changes can be charted on a global scale with a method that couples limited proteolysis with mass spectrometry–based proteomics.
  • HIV-1 origins and spread

    Orli Bahcall
    28 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 46, 1159 (2015). doi:10.1038/ng.3133 Author: Orli Bahcall A phylogenomic analysis of HIV-1 sequences isolated from central Africa provides insight into the spread of group M strains.
  • Updating ModBase

    Tal Nawy
    17 Dec 2014 | 4:00 pm
    PSI-Nature Structural Biology Knowledgebase (2015). doi:10.1038/sbkb.2014.240 Author: Tal Nawy An expanded ModBase comparative protein structure database and toolkit enables insights into protein function, including determinants of HIV-1 protease specificity.
 
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