Nature.com

 
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    Nature - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • When right beats might

    23 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    When right beats might Nature 518, 7540 (2015). doi:10.1038/518455a The final act in a long-running Italian saga should bring tighter controls on unproven stem-cell therapies, both at home and abroad.
  • No strings

    24 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    No strings Nature 518, 7540 (2015). doi:10.1038/518456a Details of a climate-change sceptic’s links to the energy industry make worrying reading.
  • A sore thing

    24 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    A sore thing Nature 518, 7540 (2015). doi:10.1038/518456b The use of technologies that objectively measure pain must be carefully monitored.
  • Focus on political Islamic groups to boost science

    Dyna Rochmyaningsih
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Focus on political Islamic groups to boost science Nature 518, 7540 (2015). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/518457a Author: Dyna Rochmyaningsih For science to realize its potential in the Muslim world, attitudes need to change at a societal level, not just an individual one, says Dyna Rochmyaningsih.
  • Ecology: Competing bluebirds make tougher sons

    24 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Ecology: Competing bluebirds make tougher sons Nature 518, 7540 (2015). doi:10.1038/518458a Female western bluebirds that have to compete for nesting sites produce more early-hatching male chicks than do females with fewer competitors. The chicks are also likely to be more aggressive. This has long-term effects on the range and behaviour of subsequent generations.Renée Duckworth and
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  • Dietary emulsifiers impact the mouse gut microbiota promoting colitis and metabolic syndrome

    Benoit Chassaing
    24 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 25 February 2015. doi:10.1038/nature14232 Authors: Benoit Chassaing, Omry Koren, Julia K. Goodrich, Angela C. Poole, Shanthi Srinivasan, Ruth E. Ley & Andrew T. Gewirtz The intestinal tract is inhabited by a large and diverse community of microbes collectively referred to as the gut microbiota. While the gut microbiota provides important benefits to its host, especially in metabolism and immune development, disturbance of the microbiota–host relationship is associated with numerous chronic inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease…
  • A motor cortex circuit for motor planning and movement

    Nuo Li
    24 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 25 February 2015. doi:10.1038/nature14178 Authors: Nuo Li, Tsai-Wen Chen, Zengcai V. Guo, Charles R. Gerfen & Karel Svoboda
  • Cell signalling: Disarming Wnt

    Roel Nusse
    24 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 25 February 2015. doi:10.1038/nature14208 Author: Roel Nusse The secreted enzyme Notum has been found to inhibit the Wnt signalling pathway through removal of a lipid that is linked to the Wnt protein and that is required for activation of Wnt receptor proteins.
  • Quantitative evolutionary dynamics using high-resolution lineage tracking

    Sasha F. Levy
    24 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 25 February 2015. doi:10.1038/nature14279 Authors: Sasha F. Levy, Jamie R. Blundell, Sandeep Venkataram, Dmitri A. Petrov, Daniel S. Fisher & Gavin Sherlock
  • Notum deacylates Wnt proteins to suppress signalling activity

    Satoshi Kakugawa
    24 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 25 February 2015. doi:10.1038/nature14259 Authors: Satoshi Kakugawa, Paul F. Langton, Matthias Zebisch, Steven A. Howell, Tao-Hsin Chang, Yan Liu, Ten Feizi, Ganka Bineva, Nicola O’Reilly, Ambrosius P. Snijders, E. Yvonne Jones & Jean-Paul Vincent
 
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    Scientific American

  • The Coming Revolution in Knee Repair

    Claudia Wallis
    16 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Scientific American 312, 25 (2015). doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0315-25 Author: Claudia Wallis New techniques in orthopedic surgery aim to unleash the body's own healing power
  • The Bird with a Breadbox

    Jason G. Goldman
    16 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Scientific American 312, 14 (2015). doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0315-14 Author: Jason G. Goldman Spotted nutcrackers take perishability into account when storing food for later
  • Letters

    16 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Scientific American 312, 4 (2015). doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0315-4
  • Dust Up

    Mark Fischetti
    16 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Scientific American 312, 78 (2015). doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0315-78 Author: Mark Fischetti What would happen if the Yellowstone supervolcano erupted?
  • 50, 100 & 150 Years Ago

    Daniel C. Schlenoff
    16 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Scientific American 312, 77 (2015). doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0315-77 Author: Daniel C. Schlenoff
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    Scientific American Mind

  • On Our Shelf

    11 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Scientific American Mind 26, 77 (2015). doi:10.1038/scientificamericanmind0315-77b
  • From Mind to Matter

    Victoria Stern
    11 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Scientific American Mind 26, 14 (2015). doi:10.1038/scientificamericanmind0315-14b Author: Victoria Stern Many physical maladies can be triggered by negative expectations, a phenomenon known as the nocebo effect
  • Head vs. Heart

    Robert Epstein
    11 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Scientific American Mind 26, 76 (2015). doi:10.1038/scientificamericanmind0315-76a Author: Robert Epstein
  • First Aid for Mental Health

    Aliyah Baruchin
    11 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Scientific American Mind 26, 68 (2015). doi:10.1038/scientificamericanmind0315-68 Author: Aliyah Baruchin Could an eight-hour class prevent tragedies triggered by psychiatric disorders?
  • Weight Loss for Nondummies

    Robert Epstein
    11 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Scientific American Mind 26, 76 (2015). doi:10.1038/scientificamericanmind0315-76c Author: Robert Epstein
 
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    Nature Biotechnology - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • Inducible in vivo genome editing with CRISPR-Cas9

    Lukas E Dow
    17 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3155 Authors: Lukas E Dow, Jonathan Fisher, Kevin P O'Rourke, Ashlesha Muley, Edward R Kastenhuber, Geulah Livshits, Darjus F Tschaharganeh, Nicholas D Socci & Scott W Lowe CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing enables the rapid genetic manipulation of any genomic locus without the need for gene targeting by homologous recombination. Here we describe a conditional transgenic approach that allows temporal control of CRISPR-Cas9 activity for inducible genome editing in adult mice. We show that doxycycline-regulated Cas9 induction enables widespread gene…
  • C2H2 zinc finger proteins greatly expand the human regulatory lexicon

    Hamed S Najafabadi
    17 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3128 Authors: Hamed S Najafabadi, Sanie Mnaimneh, Frank W Schmitges, Michael Garton, Kathy N Lam, Ally Yang, Mihai Albu, Matthew T Weirauch, Ernest Radovani, Philip M Kim, Jack Greenblatt, Brendan J Frey & Timothy R Hughes
  • Large-scale imputation of epigenomic datasets for systematic annotation of diverse human tissues

    Jason Ernst
    17 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3157 Authors: Jason Ernst & Manolis Kellis
  • StringTie enables improved reconstruction of a transcriptome from RNA-seq reads

    Mihaela Pertea
    17 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3122 Authors: Mihaela Pertea, Geo M Pertea, Corina M Antonescu, Tsung-Cheng Chang, Joshua T Mendell & Steven L Salzberg Methods used to sequence the transcriptome often produce more than 200 million short sequences. We introduce StringTie, a computational method that applies a network flow algorithm originally developed in optimization theory, together with optional de novo assembly, to assemble these complex data sets into transcripts. When used to analyze both simulated and real data sets, StringTie produces more complete and accurate…
  • Epigenomic annotation of genetic variants using the Roadmap Epigenome Browser

    Xin Zhou
    17 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3158 Authors: Xin Zhou, Daofeng Li, Bo Zhang, Rebecca F Lowdon, Nicole B Rockweiler, Renee L Sears, Pamela A F Madden, Ivan Smirnov, Joseph F Costello & Ting Wang
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    Nature Cell Biology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • In vivo reprogramming for tissue repair

    Christophe Heinrich
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Cell Biology 17, 204 (2015). doi:10.1038/ncb3108 Authors: Christophe Heinrich, Francesca M. Spagnoli & Benedikt Berninger
  • Introducing double-blind peer review

    26 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Cell Biology 17, 195 (2015). doi:10.1038/ncb3140 Nature and its sister journals start offering anonymity to authors during the peer-review process.
  • Lysosomal calcium signalling regulates autophagy through calcineurin and TFEB

    Diego L. Medina
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Cell Biology 17, 288 (2015). doi:10.1038/ncb3114 Authors: Diego L. Medina, Simone Di Paola, Ivana Peluso, Andrea Armani, Diego De Stefani, Rossella Venditti, Sandro Montefusco, Anna Scotto-Rosato, Carolina Prezioso, Alison Forrester, Carmine Settembre, Wuyang Wang, Qiong Gao, Haoxing Xu, Marco Sandri, Rosario Rizzuto, Maria Antonietta De Matteis & Andrea Ballabio
  • Tipping the metabolic scales towards increased longevity in mammals

    Celine E. Riera
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Cell Biology 17, 196 (2015). doi:10.1038/ncb3107 Authors: Celine E. Riera & Andrew Dillin
  • Merlin's wizardry guides cohesive migration

    Ansgar Zoch
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Cell Biology 17, 212 (2015). doi:10.1038/ncb3126 Authors: Ansgar Zoch & Helen Morrison Cells often migrate in tightly connected groups with coordinated movement and polarity. The collective migration of epithelial cell sheets is now shown to be mediated by a signalling axis that involves the merlin tumour-suppressor protein, the tight-junction-associated angiomotin–Rich1 complex and the Rac1 small GTPase.
 
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    Nature Chemical Biology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Natural products: Untwisting the antibiotic'ome

    Chad W Johnston
    16 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 11, 177 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1757 Authors: Chad W Johnston & Nathan A Magarvey Microbial natural products and the specific subset with antibiotic activity, 'the antibiotic'ome', consist of a dizzying array of structures and exert their effects by many known modes of action. In this issue, Cociancich et al. describe a unique natural product that—along with a compound identified in a recent publication by Baumann et al.—defines a new antibacterial chemical scaffold that acts on a rarely hit target, DNA gyrase subunit A.
  • Non-natural amino acids: A synthetase swap

    Catherine Goodman
    16 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 11, 174 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1761 Author: Catherine Goodman
  • Quorum sensing: mRNA tug of war

    Grant Miura
    16 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 11, 174 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1760 Author: Grant Miura
  • Protein aggregation: Curling damage

    Mirella Bucci
    16 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 11, 174 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1763 Author: Mirella Bucci
  • Metabolism: 'Channeling' Hans Krebs

    Danielle Tullman-Ercek
    16 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 11, 180 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1758 Author: Danielle Tullman-Ercek The physical arrangement of enzymes within native metabolic pathways is emerging as an important but underexplored area of molecular biology. Recent advances in mass spectrometry enabled confirmation of the proposal that the Krebs cycle enzymes form a complex and suggest that substrate channeling is the most likely benefit to this structural arrangement.
 
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    Nature Chemistry

  • Stepwise growth of surface-grafted DNA nanotubes visualized at the single-molecule level

    Amani A. Hariri
    22 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2184 Authors: Amani A. Hariri, Graham D. Hamblin, Yasser Gidi, Hanadi F. Sleiman & Gonzalo Cosa DNA nanotubes are attractive building blocks for the assembly of complex arrays. An efficient solid-state synthesis for producing surface-grafted, robust nanotubes has now been devised. Rungs are incorporated in a stepwise manner so that each one is addressable. Using fluorescent tags, the nanotube growth was visualized at the single-molecule level.
  • Inducing and quantifying forbidden reactivity with single-molecule polymer mechanochemistry

    Junpeng Wang
    22 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2185 Authors: Junpeng Wang, Tatiana B. Kouznetsova, Zhenbin Niu, Mitchell T. Ong, Hope M. Klukovich, Arnold L. Rheingold, Todd J. Martinez & Stephen L. Craig Externally applied mechanical forces can steer molecules along reaction paths that are otherwise inaccessible. Single-molecule force spectroscopy has now been used to quantify the force required to induce symmetry-forbidden reactivity in three different reactions and compare their behaviour to that of the symmetry-allowed analogues.
  • Supramolecular nesting of cyclic polymers

    Dmitry V. Kondratuk
    15 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2182 Authors: Dmitry V. Kondratuk, Luís M. A. Perdigão, Ayad M. S. Esmail, James N. O'Shea, Peter H. Beton & Harry L. Anderson Biopolymers adopt functional tertiary structures through folding and multiplex formation. Synthetic molecules with protein-like dimensions — monodisperse cyclic porphyrin polymers with diameters of 13–21 nm — have now been shown to exhibit biomimetic self-organization by forming nested structures on a gold surface. These assemblies are formed both under vacuum and during deposition from solution.
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    Nature Genetics - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Corrigendum: The genome sequence of the orchid Phalaenopsis equestris

    Jing Cai
    24 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 47, 304 (2015). doi:10.1038/ng0315-304a Author: Jing Cai, Xin Liu, Kevin Vanneste, Sebastian Proost, Wen-Chieh Tsai, Ke-Wei Liu, Li-Jun Chen, Ying He, Qing Xu, Chao Bian, Zhijun Zheng, Fengming Sun, Weiqing Liu, Yu-Yun Hsiao, Zhao-Jun Pan, Chia-Chi Hsu, Ya-Ping Yang, Yi-Chin Hsu, Yu-Chen Chuang, Anne Dievart, Jean-Francois Dufayard, Xun Xu, Jun-Yi Wang, Jun Wang, Xin-Ju Xiao, Xue-Min Zhao, Rong Du, Guo-Qiang Zhang, Meina Wang, Yong-Yu Su, Gao-Chang Xie, Guo-Hui Liu, Li-Qiang Li, Lai-Qiang Huang, Yi-Bo Luo, Hong-Hwa Chen, Yves Van de Peer & Zhong-Jian Liu
  • Evolution of Tibetan wild boars

    Laurent A F Frantz
    24 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 47, 188 (2015). doi:10.1038/ng.3197 Authors: Laurent A F Frantz, Ole Madsen, Hendrik-Jan Megens, Joshua G Schraiber, Yogesh Paudel, Mirte Bosse, Richard P M A Crooijmans, Greger Larson & Martien A M Groenen
  • Micropeptide regulates muscle performance

    Kyle Vogan
    24 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 47, 198 (2015). doi:10.1038/ng.3235 Author: Kyle Vogan
  • Reply to 'Evolution of Tibetan wild boars'

    Mingzhou Li
    24 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 47, 189 (2015). doi:10.1038/ng.3194 Authors: Mingzhou Li, Ying Li, Carol K L Yeung, Shilin Tian, Xuewei Li & Ruiqiang Li
  • Long-term memory genes in C. elegans

    Brooke LaFlamme
    24 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 47, 198 (2015). doi:10.1038/ng.3233 Author: Brooke LaFlamme
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  • Analysis of the genetic phylogeny of multifocal prostate cancer identifies multiple independent clonal expansions in neoplastic and morphologically normal prostate tissue

    Colin S Cooper
    1 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Genetics. doi:10.1038/ng.3221 Authors: Colin S Cooper, Rosalind Eeles, David C Wedge, Peter Van Loo, Gunes Gundem, Ludmil B Alexandrov, Barbara Kremeyer, Adam Butler, Andrew G Lynch, Niedzica Camacho, Charlie E Massie, Jonathan Kay, Hayley J Luxton, Sandra Edwards, Zsofia Kote-Jarai, Nening Dennis, Sue Merson, Daniel Leongamornlert, Jorge Zamora, Cathy Corbishley, Sarah Thomas, Serena Nik-Zainal, Sarah O'Meara, Lucy Matthews, Jeremy Clark, Rachel Hurst, Richard Mithen, Robert G Bristow, Paul C Boutros, Michael Fraser, Susanna Cooke, Keiran Raine, David Jones, Andrew Menzies, Lucy…
  • Analyses of allele-specific gene expression in highly divergent mouse crosses identifies pervasive allelic imbalance

    James J Crowley
    1 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Genetics. doi:10.1038/ng.3222 Authors: James J Crowley, Vasyl Zhabotynsky, Wei Sun, Shunping Huang, Isa Kemal Pakatci, Yunjung Kim, Jeremy R Wang, Andrew P Morgan, John D Calaway, David L Aylor, Zaining Yun, Timothy A Bell, Ryan J Buus, Mark E Calaway, John P Didion, Terry J Gooch, Stephanie D Hansen, Nashiya N Robinson, Ginger D Shaw, Jason S Spence, Corey R Quackenbush, Cordelia J Barrick, Randal J Nonneman, Kyungsu Kim, James Xenakis, Yuying Xie, William Valdar, Alan B Lenarcic, Wei Wang, Catherine E Welsh, Chen-Ping Fu, Zhaojun Zhang, James Holt, Zhishan Guo, David W Threadgill,…
  • Germline gain-of-function mutations in AFF4 cause a developmental syndrome functionally linking the super elongation complex and cohesin

    Kosuke Izumi
    1 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Genetics. doi:10.1038/ng.3229 Authors: Kosuke Izumi, Ryuichiro Nakato, Zhe Zhang, Andrew C Edmondson, Sarah Noon, Matthew C Dulik, Ramakrishnan Rajagopalan, Charles P Venditti, Karen Gripp, Joy Samanich, Elaine H Zackai, Matthew A Deardorff, Dinah Clark, Julian L Allen, Dale Dorsett, Ziva Misulovin, Makiko Komata, Masashige Bando, Maninder Kaur, Yuki Katou, Katsuhiko Shirahige & Ian D Krantz
  • The landscape of somatic mutations in infant MLL-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemias

    Anna K Andersson
    1 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Genetics. doi:10.1038/ng.3230 Authors: Anna K Andersson, Jing Ma, Jianmin Wang, Xiang Chen, Amanda Larson Gedman, Jinjun Dang, Joy Nakitandwe, Linda Holmfeldt, Matthew Parker, John Easton, Robert Huether, Richard Kriwacki, Michael Rusch, Gang Wu, Yongjin Li, Heather Mulder, Susana Raimondi, Stanley Pounds, Guolian Kang, Lei Shi, Jared Becksfort, Pankaj Gupta, Debbie Payne-Turner, Bhavin Vadodaria, Kristy Boggs, Donald Yergeau, Jayanthi Manne, Guangchun Song, Michael Edmonson, Panduka Nagahawatte, Lei Wei, Cheng Cheng, Deqing Pei, Rosemary Sutton, Nicola C Venn, Albert Chetcuti, Amanda…
  • The genome and transcriptome of the zoonotic hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum identify infection-specific gene families

    Erich M Schwarz
    1 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Genetics. doi:10.1038/ng.3237 Authors: Erich M Schwarz, Yan Hu, Igor Antoshechkin, Melanie M Miller, Paul W Sternberg & Raffi V Aroian Hookworms infect over 400 million people, stunting and impoverishing them. Sequencing hookworm genomes and finding which genes they express during infection should help in devising new drugs or vaccines against hookworms. Unlike other hookworms, Ancylostoma ceylanicum infects both humans and other mammals, providing a laboratory model for hookworm disease. We determined an A. ceylanicum genome sequence of 313 Mb, with transcriptomic data throughout…
 
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    Nature Geoscience - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Carbon sequestration: Biology's growing role

    Jonathan E. Hickman
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience 8, 173 (2015). doi:10.1038/ngeo2386 Author: Jonathan E. Hickman
  • Economic geology: Ore metals beneath volcanoes

    Olivier Nadeau
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience 8, 168 (2015). doi:10.1038/ngeo2379 Author: Olivier Nadeau Metals often accumulate in the crust beneath volcanoes. Laboratory experiments and observations reveal important roles for magmatic vapours and brines in transporting and concentrating the metals into deposits worth targeting for extraction.
  • The quest for sea-floor integrity

    Till Markus
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience 8, 163 (2015). doi:10.1038/ngeo2380 Authors: Till Markus, Katrin Huhn & Kai Bischof The status of sea floors is an important part of healthy marine ecosystems and intact coastlines. We need laws and a sea-floor management regime to make the exploitation of marine resources sustainable.
  • Porphyry copper deposit formation by sub-volcanic sulphur dioxide flux and chemisorption

    Richard W. Henley
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience 8, 210 (2015). doi:10.1038/ngeo2367 Authors: Richard W. Henley, Penelope L. King, Jeremy L. Wykes, Christian J. Renggli, Frank J. Brink, David A. Clark & Ulrike Troitzsch Porphyry copper deposits—the primary source of the world’s copper—are a consequence of the degassing of intrusion complexes in magmatic arcs associated with ancient subduction zones. They are characterized by copper and iron sulphides, commonly found with anhydrite (CaSO4), over scales of several kilometres through intensely altered and fractured rocks. The magmatic source of the…
  • Biomining goes underground

    D. Barrie Johnson
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience 8, 165 (2015). doi:10.1038/ngeo2384 Author: D. Barrie Johnson Ore bodies buried deep in Earth's crust could meet increasing global demands for metals, but mining them would be costly and could damage the environment. Reinventing an ancient technology for bioleaching metals could provide a solution.
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  • Planetary science: Iron fog of accretion

    William W. Anderson
    1 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2391 Author: William W. Anderson Pinpointing when Earth's core formed depends on the extent of metal–silicate equilibration in the mantle. Vaporization and recondensation of impacting planetesimal cores during accretion may reconcile disparate lines of evidence.
  • Ice nucleation by cellulose and its potential contribution to ice formation in clouds

    N. Hiranuma
    1 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2374 Authors: N. Hiranuma, O. Möhler, K. Yamashita, T. Tajiri, A. Saito, A. Kiselev, N. Hoffmann, C. Hoose, E. Jantsch, T. Koop & M. Murakami Ice particles in the atmosphere influence clouds, precipitation and climate, and often form with help from aerosols that serve as ice-nucleating particles. Biological particles, including non-proteinaceous ones, contribute to the diverse spectrum of ice-nucleating particles. However, little is known about their atmospheric abundance and ice nucleation efficiency, and their role in clouds and the climate system…
  • Impact vaporization of planetesimal cores in the late stages of planet formation

    Richard G. Kraus
    1 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2369 Authors: Richard G. Kraus, Seth Root, Raymond W. Lemke, Sarah T. Stewart, Stein B. Jacobsen & Thomas R. Mattsson Differentiated planetesimals delivered iron-rich material to the Earth and Moon in high-velocity collisions at the end stages of accretion. The physical process of accreting this late material has implications for the geochemical evolution of the Earth–Moon system and the timing of Earth’s core formation. However, the fraction of a planetesimal’s iron core that is vaporized by an impact is not well constrained as a…
  • Icelandic volcanic emissions and climate

    Andrew Gettelman
    15 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2376 Authors: Andrew Gettelman, Anja Schmidt & Jón Egill Kristjánsson
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    Nature Immunology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Healing the CNS

    Zoltan Fehervari
    16 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Immunology 16, 228 (2015). doi:10.1038/ni.3111 Author: Zoltan Fehervari
  • LincRNA signatures in human lymphocytes

    Benoit T Roux
    16 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Immunology 16, 220 (2015). doi:10.1038/ni.3106 Authors: Benoit T Roux & Mark A Lindsay Sequencing studies have provided a comprehensive catalog of the expression of intergenic long noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) in 13 subsets of human T cells and B cells. Subtype-selective lincRNAs are among those identified, including linc-MAF-4, that might regulate T cell differentiation.
  • Feeding immunity: skepticism, delicacies and delights

    Marc Veldhoen
    16 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Immunology 16, 215 (2015). doi:10.1038/ni.3100 Authors: Marc Veldhoen & Henrique Veiga-Fernandes
  • Profiling the diversity of innate lymphoid cells

    Andreas Diefenbach
    16 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Immunology 16, 222 (2015). doi:10.1038/ni.3107 Author: Andreas Diefenbach Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of tissue-resident innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) has provided important insight not only into their developmental relationships and phenotypic plasticity but also into previously unknown functions.
  • Venom activity

    Ioana Visan
    16 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Immunology 16, 228 (2015). doi:10.1038/ni.3113 Author: Ioana Visan
 
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    Nature Materials - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Quantum optics: The dark exciton as a qubit

    Maria Maragkou
    19 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Materials 14, 260 (2015). doi:10.1038/nmat4243 Author: Maria Maragkou
  • Predicting material release during a nuclear reactor accident

    Rudy J. M. Konings
    19 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Materials 14, 247 (2015). doi:10.1038/nmat4224 Authors: Rudy J. M. Konings, Thierry Wiss & Ondřej Beneš In the aftermath of a nuclear reactor accident, understanding the release of fission products from the fuel is key.
  • Quantum mechanics: Entangled spins

    David Ciudad
    19 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Materials 14, 260 (2015). doi:10.1038/nmat4241 Author: David Ciudad
  • Long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel

    Rodney C. Ewing
    19 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Materials 14, 252 (2015). doi:10.1038/nmat4226 Author: Rodney C. Ewing To design reliable and safe geological repositories it is critical to understand how the characteristics of spent nuclear fuel evolve with time, and how this affects the storage environment.
  • Glass corrosion: Sharpened interface

    Andrew Putnis
    19 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Materials 14, 261 (2015). doi:10.1038/nmat4198 Author: Andrew Putnis The finding of a sharp interface between a chemically attacked surface and the pristine bulk in a borosilicate glass is at odds with the widely held diffusion-based mechanisms of glass durability.
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  • Atomic origin of ultrafast resistance switching in nanoscale electrometallization cells

    Nicolas Onofrio
    1 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4221 Authors: Nicolas Onofrio, David Guzman & Alejandro Strachan
  • High-precision realization of robust quantum anomalous Hall state in a hard ferromagnetic topological insulator

    Cui-Zu Chang
    1 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4204 Authors: Cui-Zu Chang, Weiwei Zhao, Duk Y. Kim, Haijun Zhang, Badih A. Assaf, Don Heiman, Shou-Cheng Zhang, Chaoxing Liu, Moses H. W. Chan & Jagadeesh S. Moodera The discovery of the quantum Hall (QH) effect led to the realization of a topological electronic state with dissipationless currents circulating in one direction along the edge of a two-dimensional electron layer under a strong magnetic field. The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect shares a similar physical phenomenon to that of the QH effect, whereas its physical origin relies on the…
  • Universal helimagnon and skyrmion excitations in metallic, semiconducting and insulating chiral magnets

    T. Schwarze
    1 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4223 Authors: T. Schwarze, J. Waizner, M. Garst, A. Bauer, I. Stasinopoulos, H. Berger, C. Pfleiderer & D. Grundler Nearly seven decades of research on microwave excitations of magnetic materials have led to a wide range of applications in electronics. The recent discovery of topological spin solitons in chiral magnets, so-called skyrmions, promises high-frequency devices that exploit the exceptional emergent electrodynamics of these compounds. Therefore, an accurate and unified quantitative account of their resonant response is key. Here, we report…
  • Solid friction between soft filaments

    Andrew Ward
    1 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4222 Authors: Andrew Ward, Feodor Hilitski, Walter Schwenger, David Welch, A. W. C. Lau, Vincenzo Vitelli, L. Mahadevan & Zvonimir Dogic Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly…
  • Raman spectroscopy of hot hydrogen above 200 GPa

    Ross T. Howie
    22 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4213 Authors: Ross T. Howie, Philip Dalladay-Simpson & Eugene Gregoryanz It has been theorized that at high pressure the increased energy of the zero-point oscillations in hydrogen would destabilize the lattice and form a ground fluid state at 0 K (ref. ). Theory has also suggested that this fluid state, representing a new state of matter, might have unusual properties governed by quantum effects, such as superfluidity or superconductivity. Here, by combining Raman spectroscopy and in situ high-temperature, high-pressure techniques, we demonstrate that…
 
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    Nature Medicine - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • Rapid mass spectrometric conversion of tissue biopsy samples into permanent quantitative digital proteome maps

    Tiannan Guo
    1 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Medicine. doi:10.1038/nm.3807 Authors: Tiannan Guo, Petri Kouvonen, Ching Chiek Koh, Ludovic C Gillet, Witold E Wolski, Hannes L Röst, George Rosenberger, Ben C Collins, Lorenz C Blum, Silke Gillessen, Markus Joerger, Wolfram Jochum & Ruedi Aebersold
  • A bacterial cyclic dinucleotide activates the cytosolic surveillance pathway and mediates innate resistance to tuberculosis

    Bappaditya Dey
    1 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Medicine. doi:10.1038/nm.3813 Authors: Bappaditya Dey, Ruchi Jain Dey, Laurene S Cheung, Supriya Pokkali, Haidan Guo, Jong-Hee Lee & William R Bishai Detection of cyclic-di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP), a bacterial second messenger, by the host cytoplasmic surveillance pathway (CSP) is known to elicit type I interferon (IFN) responses, which are crucial to antimicrobial defense. However, the mechanisms and role of c-di-AMP signaling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence remain unclear. Here we show that resistance to tuberculosis requires CSP-mediated detection of c-di-AMP…
  • Modeling colorectal cancer using CRISPR-Cas9–mediated engineering of human intestinal organoids

    Mami Matano
    22 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Medicine. doi:10.1038/nm.3802 Authors: Mami Matano, Shoichi Date, Mariko Shimokawa, Ai Takano, Masayuki Fujii, Yuki Ohta, Toshiaki Watanabe, Takanori Kanai & Toshiro Sato Human colorectal tumors bear recurrent mutations in genes encoding proteins operative in the WNT, MAPK, TGF-β, TP53 and PI3K pathways. Although these pathways influence intestinal stem cell niche signaling, the extent to which mutations in these pathways contribute to human colorectal carcinogenesis remains unclear. Here we use the CRISPR-Cas9 genome-editing system to introduce multiple such mutations into…
  • LTB4 promotes insulin resistance in obese mice by acting on macrophages, hepatocytes and myocytes

    Pingping Li
    22 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Medicine. doi:10.1038/nm.3800 Authors: Pingping Li, Da Young Oh, Gautam Bandyopadhyay, William S Lagakos, Saswata Talukdar, Olivia Osborn, Andrew Johnson, Heekyung Chung, Rafael Mayoral, Michael Maris, Jachelle M Ofrecio, Sayaka Taguchi, Min Lu & Jerrold M Olefsky
  • DNA methyltransferase 3a regulates osteoclast differentiation by coupling to an S-adenosylmethionine–producing metabolic pathway

    Keizo Nishikawa
    22 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Medicine. doi:10.1038/nm.3774 Authors: Keizo Nishikawa, Yoriko Iwamoto, Yasuhiro Kobayashi, Fumiki Katsuoka, Shin-ichi Kawaguchi, Tadayuki Tsujita, Takashi Nakamura, Shigeaki Kato, Masayuki Yamamoto, Hiroshi Takayanagi & Masaru Ishii Metabolic reprogramming occurs in response to the cellular environment to mediate differentiation, but the fundamental mechanisms linking metabolic processes to differentiation programs remain to be elucidated. During osteoclast differentiation, a shift toward more oxidative metabolic processes occurs. In this study we identified the de novo DNA…
 
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    Nature Nanotechnology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Molecular histology: More than a picture

    Richard W. Vachet
    4 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 10, 103 (2015). doi:10.1038/nnano.2015.4 Author: Richard W. Vachet A label-free mass spectrometry imaging method maps the locations of carbon nanomaterials injected into mice through the detection of small carbon clusters.
  • Can we be more social?

    4 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 10, 101 (2015). doi:10.1038/nnano.2015.21 The social and economic issues surrounding nanotechnology should not be forgotten.
  • Remodelling technology transfer

    Emmanuel L. P. Dumont
    4 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 10, 184 (2015). doi:10.1038/nnano.2015.8 Author: Emmanuel L. P. Dumont Should inventors control the fate of their own inventions? In the US, most universities think not. But, as Emmanuel Dumont explains, the Jacobs Technion-Cornell Institute at Cornell Tech in New York City bets otherwise.
  • Our choice from the recent literature

    4 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 10, 102 (2015). doi:10.1038/nnano.2015.12
  • Nitrogen–vacancy centres: Nanoscale MRI

    Vidya Praveen Bhallamudi
    4 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 10, 104 (2015). doi:10.1038/nnano.2015.7 Authors: Vidya Praveen Bhallamudi & P. Chris Hammel Sensitive measurement of nitrogen–vacancy centres close to the surface of diamond enables magnetic resonance imaging with a resolution of a few nanometres in ambient conditions.
 
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    Nature Neuroscience - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • Anxious individuals have difficulty learning the causal statistics of aversive environments

    Michael Browning
    1 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience. doi:10.1038/nn.3961 Authors: Michael Browning, Timothy E Behrens, Gerhard Jocham, Jill X O'Reilly & Sonia J Bishop
  • Fast clonal expansion and limited neural stem cell self-renewal in the adult subependymal zone

    Filippo Calzolari
    1 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience. doi:10.1038/nn.3963 Authors: Filippo Calzolari, Julia Michel, Emily Violette Baumgart, Fabian Theis, Magdalena Götz & Jovica Ninkovic We analyzed the progeny of individual neural stem cells (NSCs) of the mouse adult subependymal zone (SEZ) in vivo and found a markedly fast lineage amplification, as well as limited NSC self-renewal and exhaustion in a few weeks. We further unraveled the mechanisms of neuronal subtype generation, finding that a higher proportion of NSCs were dedicated to generate deep granule cells in the olfactory bulb and that larger clones were…
  • GLUT1 reductions exacerbate Alzheimer's disease vasculo-neuronal dysfunction and degeneration

    Ethan A Winkler
    1 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience. doi:10.1038/nn.3966 Authors: Ethan A Winkler, Yoichiro Nishida, Abhay P Sagare, Sanket V Rege, Robert D Bell, David Perlmutter, Jesse D Sengillo, Sara Hillman, Pan Kong, Amy R Nelson, John S Sullivan, Zhen Zhao, Herbert J Meiselman, Rosalinda B Wenby, Jamie Soto, E Dale Abel, Jacob Makshanoff, Edward Zuniga, Darryl C De Vivo & Berislav V Zlokovic
  • Attention alters orientation processing in the human lateral geniculate nucleus

    Sam Ling
    1 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience. doi:10.1038/nn.3967 Authors: Sam Ling, Michael S Pratte & Frank Tong Orientation selectivity is a cornerstone property of vision, commonly believed to emerge in the primary visual cortex. We found that reliable orientation information could be detected even earlier, in the human lateral geniculate nucleus, and that attentional feedback selectively altered these orientation responses. This attentional modulation may allow the visual system to modify incoming feature-specific signals at the earliest possible processing site.
  • Internally organized mechanisms of the head direction sense

    Adrien Peyrache
    1 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience. doi:10.1038/nn.3968 Authors: Adrien Peyrache, Marie M Lacroix, Peter C Petersen & György Buzsáki
 
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    Nature Physics - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Dwarf-galaxy giants

    May Chiao
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics 11, 210 (2015). doi:10.1038/nphys3281 Author: May Chiao
  • Phase out

    Luke Fleet
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics 11, 210 (2015). doi:10.1038/nphys3285 Author: Luke Fleet
  • Too cool to work

    Xavier Moya
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics 11, 202 (2015). doi:10.1038/nphys3271 Authors: Xavier Moya, Emmanuel Defay, Volker Heine & Neil D. Mathur Magnetocaloric and electrocaloric effects are driven by doing work, but this work has barely been explored, even though these caloric effects are being exploited in a growing number of prototype cooling devices.
  • Ten years of Nature Physics: Jack of all trades

    Robin Côté
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics 11, 219 (2015). doi:10.1038/nphys3250 Author: Robin Côté Over the past decade, ultracold polar molecules have found application in hybrid quantum computation and quantum simulation, directions established in three early papers published in Nature Physics.
  • In search of Majorana

    Mark Buchanan
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics 11, 206 (2015). doi:10.1038/nphys3275 Author: Mark Buchanan
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  • Subnanometre-wide electron channels protected by topology

    Christian Pauly
    1 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3264 Authors: Christian Pauly, Bertold Rasche, Klaus Koepernik, Marcus Liebmann, Marco Pratzer, Manuel Richter, Jens Kellner, Markus Eschbach, Bernhard Kaufmann, Lukasz Plucinski, Claus M. Schneider, Michael Ruck, Jeroen van den Brink & Markus Morgenstern Helical locking of spin and momentum and prohibited backscattering are the key properties of topologically protected states. They are expected to enable novel types of information processing by providing pure spin currents, or fault tolerant quantum computation by using the Majorana fermions at…
  • Phononic crystals: Entering an acoustic phase

    Julio T. Barreiro
    22 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3273 Author: Julio T. Barreiro Electrons moving in a one-dimensional crystal can acquire a geometrical phase. Sound waves in phononic crystals are now shown to display the same effect — underlining the similarity between conventional solids and acoustic metamaterials.
  • Direct observation of Josephson vortex cores

    Dimitri Roditchev
    22 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3240 Authors: Dimitri Roditchev, Christophe Brun, Lise Serrier-Garcia, Juan Carlos Cuevas, Vagner Henrique Loiola Bessa, Milorad Vlado Milošević, François Debontridder, Vasily Stolyarov & Tristan Cren Superconducting correlations may propagate between two superconductors separated by a tiny insulating or metallic barrier, allowing a dissipationless electric current to flow. In the presence of a magnetic field, the maximum supercurrent oscillates and each oscillation corresponding to the entry of one Josephson vortex into the barrier.
  • Geometric phase and band inversion in periodic acoustic systems

    Meng Xiao
    22 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3228 Authors: Meng Xiao, Guancong Ma, Zhiyu Yang, Ping Sheng, Z. Q. Zhang & C. T. Chan The geometric-phase concept has far-reaching implications in many branches of physics. The geometric phase that specifically characterizes the topological property of bulk bands in one-dimensional periodic systems is known as the Zak phase. Recently, it has been found that topological notions can also characterize the topological phase of mechanical isostatic lattices. Here, we present a theoretical framework and two experimental methods to determine the Zak phase in a…
  • Quantum distillation and confinement of vacancies in a doublon sea

    Lin Xia
    15 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3244 Authors: Lin Xia, Laura A. Zundel, Juan Carrasquilla, Aaron Reinhard, Joshua M. Wilson, Marcos Rigol & David S. Weiss Ultracold atomic gases have revolutionized the study of non-equilibrium dynamics in quantum many-body systems. Many counterintuitive non-equilibrium effects have been observed, such as suppressed thermalization in a one-dimensional (1D) gas, the formation of repulsive self-bound dimers, and identical behaviours for attractive and repulsive interactions. Here, we observe the expansion of a bundle of ultracold 1D Bose gases in a…
 
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    Nature Reviews Cancer - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Radiotherapy: Healing the brain

    M. Teresa Villanueva
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 15, 136 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrc3923 Author: M. Teresa Villanueva Radiotherapy can be very effective in the treatment of brain tumours, but it is associated with significant and irreversible long-term side effects, especially in children. Piao et al. transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitors (hOPCs) derived from human embryonic stem cells in the irradiated brains of young
  • Tumour heterogeneity: A free ride

    Sarah Seton-Rogers
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 15, 136 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrc3922 Author: Sarah Seton-Rogers Why do tumours maintain intratumour heterogeneity under selective pressures? One explanation is that tumour cells of different subclones cooperate and depend on each other for survival. Archetti et al. found that heterogeneity can also be maintained without strict interdependence between subclones. Neuroendocrine pancreatic cancer
  • Therapeutic opportunities within the DNA damage response

    Laurence H. Pearl
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 15, 166 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrc3891 Authors: Laurence H. Pearl, Amanda C. Schierz, Simon E. Ward, Bissan Al-Lazikani & Frances M. G. Pearl The DNA damage response (DDR) is essential for maintaining the genomic integrity of the cell, and its disruption is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Classically, defects in the DDR have been exploited therapeutically in the treatment of cancer with radiation therapies or genotoxic chemotherapies.
  • Therapeutics: Give it a shock

    M. Teresa Villanueva
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 15, 136 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrc3924 Author: M. Teresa Villanueva To maintain a high local concentration of chemotherapy, Byrne et al. have created two devices, implantable and transdermal, that rely on iontophoresis (the flow of charged molecules in an electric field). The devices improved the delivery and efficacy of gemcitabine in an orthotopic patient-derived
  • DNA repair: A new tool to target DNA repair

    M. Teresa Villanueva
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 15, 136 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrc3919 Author: M. Teresa Villanueva Two studies have shown that DNA polymerase-θ (POLQ) promotes an alternative form of non-homologous end-joining (alt-NHEJ) and suppresses homologous recombination (HR) in mammalian cells. The activity of alt-NHEJ is essential for the survival of cells deficient in HR.
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    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Fragile X disappointments upset autism ambitions

    Asher Mullard
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 14, 151 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrd4555 Author: Asher Mullard The clinical failure of two large mGluR5-antagonist programmes in Fragile X syndrome has forced drug developers to rethink trial design and target selection for neurodevelopmental indications.
  • Cardiovascular disease: MYDGF promotes heart repair after myocardial infarction

    Megan Cully
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 14, 164 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrd4557 Author: Megan Cully Intracoronary infusion of autologous bone marrow cells (BMCs) has been proposed as a therapy to improve heart function after acute myocardial infarction (MI). However, the efficacy of autologous cell products is highly variable, and clinical trials of BMC therapy have had mixed results. New research,
  • $215 million precision-medicine initiative takes shape

    Asher Mullard
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 14, 155 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrd4569 Author: Asher Mullard The US President Barack Obama has earmarked US$215 million from his proposed 2016 budget to precision medicine. These funds will “encourage creative approaches to precision medicine, test them rigorously, and ultimately use them to build the evidence base needed to guide clinical practice,” write the
  • Charting the decline of US biomedical research funding

    Asher Mullard
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 14, 155 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrd4567 Author: Asher Mullard A new study has reported that US-based organizations funded 44% of the world's biomedical research in 2012, down from 57% in 2004 (JAMA313, 174–189; 2015). US governmental biomedical funding fell by 7% of the total global governmental biomedical funding (from 57%
  • Patent watch: US Supreme Court revises patent claim construction standards

    Kevin Noonan
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 14, 157 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrd4564 Author: Kevin Noonan The US Supreme Court handed down another practice-changing decision in its ruling on Teva Pharmaceuticals versus Sandozin January, mandating that the US Federal Circuit must defer to facts found by trial courts when the meaning of the scope of patent claims is determined during trial.
 
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    Nature Reviews Genetics - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Human evolution: mtDNA and genetic ancestry

    Orli G. Bahcall
    17 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 128 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg3914 Author: Orli G. Bahcall The inference of human genetic ancestry based on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups has been known to be less reliable than that based on genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) platforms, but the extent of this has not been well characterized. Emery et al. now provide a
  • Pathogen genetics: Evolution of host-adapted pathogens

    Orli G. Bahcall
    17 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 128 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg3912 Author: Orli G. Bahcall Langridge et al. characterized the evolution of a single lineage of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica, a primary cause of foodborne gastroenteritis. This lineage comprises closely related members that exhibit differential host range, including host generalists (S. enterica serovar Enteritidis),
  • Functional genomics: Multiallelic copy number variation

    Orli G. Bahcall
    17 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 131 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg3916 Author: Orli G. Bahcall Multiallelic copy number variation (mCNV), for which more than two segregating alleles give rise to a wide range of copy numbers, have proved refractory to traditional analysis methods. Handsaker et al. now report the first large-scale characterization of the extent of large mCNVs based
  • Plant genomics: Maize evolution and spread

    Orli G. Bahcall
    17 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 128 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg3913 Author: Orli G. Bahcall Genomic analysis of ancient crop samples provides opportunities to more precisely characterize the evolutionary history of plants and to connect this with patterns of human-assisted migration. Da Fonseca et al. sequenced DNA extracts from 32 archaeological maize samples dated from 700–6,000 years ago, from
  • Human evolution: Phoneme–genome data set evolves

    Orli G. Bahcall
    17 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 128 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg3911 Author: Orli G. Bahcall Incorporating linguistic information into genetic studies is a promising means to improve inferences on patterns of human evolution and demography. Providing a resource to further these efforts, as well as insights into the co-evolution of genes and languages, Creanza et al. now report the
 
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    Nature Reviews Immunology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Germinal centres and B cell lymphomagenesis

    Katia Basso
    24 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 15, 172 (2015). doi:10.1038/nri3814 Authors: Katia Basso & Riccardo Dalla-Favera Germinal centres (GCs) are involved in the selection of B cells secreting high-affinity antibodies and are also the origin of most human B cell lymphomas. Recent progress has been made in identifying the functionally relevant stages of the GC and the complex trafficking mechanisms of
  • Macrophages: Breaking ranks in the lymph node

    Yvonne Bordon
    19 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 15, 132 (2015). doi:10.1038/nri3825 Author: Yvonne Bordon Inflammation disrupts the organization of subcapsular sinus macrophages, impairing the B cell response to secondary infections.
  • B cells: Meddling with the mind

    Yvonne Bordon
    19 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 15, 135 (2015). doi:10.1038/nri3826 Author: Yvonne Bordon B cell infiltration into stroke lesions may contribute to subsequent dementia development.
  • Innate immunity: Stressed mitochondria provide protection

    Elisabeth Kugelberg
    19 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 15, 134 (2015). doi:10.1038/nri3828 Author: Elisabeth Kugelberg Herpesvirus infection can lead to mitochondrial DNA stress and thereby activate antiviral defences.
  • Regulatory T cells: CK2: keeping TH2 cells in check

    Lucy Bird
    19 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 15, 134 (2015). doi:10.1038/nri3827 Author: Lucy Bird Control of excessive T helper 2 cell-type immune responses is mediated by casein kinase 2 (CK2) in regulatory T cells.
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    Nature Reviews Microbiology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Fungal physiology: A phospho-switch for pathogenesis

    Andrea Du Toit
    15 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 126 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3445 Author: Andrea Du Toit The opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida albicans undergoes a morphological switch from the commensal budding yeast form to the pathogenic filamentous pseudohyphal and hyphal forms. Transcription factor-driven changes in gene expression are associated with this fungal polymorphism, ensuring the expression of genes required for
  • Bacterial pathogenesis: Crossing the barriers

    Andrea Du Toit
    15 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 126 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3446 Author: Andrea Du Toit Following infection, Listeria monocytogenes disseminates by crossing host barriers; binding of the L. monocytogenes surface protein InlA to host E-cadherin is sufficient for crossing the intestinal barrier, whereas interactions between InlA–E-cadherin as well as InlB and the host receptor cMet are required for
  • Symbiosis: Metabolites in differentiation

    Andrea Du Toit
    15 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 126 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3447 Author: Andrea Du Toit The cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme can grow in a free-living state as multicellular vegetative filaments or as a plant symbiont. Symbiosis requires differentiation into infectious motile filaments termed hormogonia and can be stimulated by environmental conditions and by plant-derived hormogonium-inducing factors and is repressed by
  • The importance of soil archives for microbial ecology

    Jan Dolfing
    15 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 1 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3382-c1 Authors: Jan Dolfing & Youzhi Feng In a recent Comment article (The importance of sample archiving in microbial ecology. Nature Rev. Microbiol. 12, 789–790 (2014)), Cary and Fierer asserted that, as a research community, we must “develop robust strategies for long-term storage and archiving of samples in
  • Parasite biology: PINning down Theileria

    Naomi Attar
    8 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 126 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3444 Author: Naomi Attar A new study identifies the mechanistic basis for host cell transformation by Theileria spp. parasites.
 
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    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Extracellular matrix: Collagen directs invadopodia

    Katharine H. Wrighton
    17 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 16, 126 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrm3964 Author: Katharine H. Wrighton Tumour cells can harbour invadopodia (actin-rich protrusions that degrade extracellular matrix components to drive cell invasion). Artym et al. devised a new system for studying invadopodia formation, which is based on high-density fibrillar collagen (HDFC) and mimics in vivo cancer environments, and found
  • Chromatin: HP1 locked up

    Andrea Du Toit
    17 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 16, 126 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrm3962 Author: Andrea Du Toit Pericentric heterochromatin is marked by heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), which is recruited to these regions by trimethylated Lys9 of histone H3 (H3K9me3); however it has been suggested that this modification is not the sole requirement for stable HP1 enrichment. In this study, Romeo et al
  • Cell signalling: Orphan receptor finds ligand

    Katharine H. Wrighton
    17 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 16, 126 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrm3963 Author: Katharine H. Wrighton Signalling through the tyrosine receptor kinase ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) is important in development, and aberrant ALK activation has been implicated in several cancers. Although it has been suggested that two heparin-binding extracellular proteins (pleiotrophin and midkine) activate this receptor, the identity of its ligand
  • Gene expression: DYRK1A targets Pol II

    Andrea Du Toit
    17 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 16, 127 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrm3961 Author: Andrea Du Toit Dual-specific tyrosine-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) has key roles in developmental processes and tissue homeostasis, and its dysregulation has been associated with human pathologies. Although DYRK1A is present in the nucleus and cytoplasm, its role in the nuclear compartment was elusive. Now, Di Vona et al
  • Orchestrating transcription with the pol II CTD

    Ronald C. Conaway
    17 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 16, 128 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrm3956 Authors: Ronald C. Conaway & Joan W. Conaway Ronald and Joan Conaway highlight studies that established the role of phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) in the transition from transcription initiation to elongation, which paved the ground for following work on the CTD in regulating co-transcriptional processes.
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    Nature Reviews Neuroscience - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Cell biology of the neuron: Skin cells clear neuronal debris

    Katherine Whalley
    19 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 122 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrn3928 Author: Katherine Whalley Cutaneous injuries can damage the somatosensory neurons that innervate the skin, and repair of these neurons requires the debris generated by degenerating axons to be removed. The authors found that, in zebrafish, cutaneous axon debris resulting from a laser-induced injury was not cleared by 'professional
  • Synaptic transmission: Transporter trafficking

    Katherine Whalley
    19 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 122 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrn3930 Author: Katherine Whalley Glutamate transporters make a crucial contribution to neuronal signalling by rapidly removing excess glutamate from the synaptic cleft. Here, the authors showed that surface trafficking of the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT1 (also known as EAAT2) was regulated by neuronal and glial activity. Blocking the surface
  • Learning and memory: Emotional memory tagging

    Katherine Whalley
    19 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 122 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrn3927 Author: Katherine Whalley In animals, short-term memories generated by weak behavioural training can be strengthened and converted to long-term memories by a subsequent novel experience, such as exposure to a new environment. The authors here showed that a similar phenomenon occurs in humans: participants' recollection of otherwise neutral
  • Neuroimmunology: Immune cells drive resilience

    Katherine Whalley
    19 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 122 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrn3929 Author: Katherine Whalley In recent years, the concept of a bidirectional regulatory relationship between the brain and the immune system has gained support. Here, the authors isolated lymphocytes from mice subjected to chronic social defeat stress and adoptively transferred these cells into naive mice. The recipients exhibited reduced
  • Sensory systems: Noisy nociception

    Natasha Bray
    19 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 122 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrn3926 Author: Natasha Bray A set of neurons in the cochlear organ of Corti is activated in response to noxious sound levels and thus mediates 'auditory nociception'.
 
 
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    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Targeted therapies: DNA polymerase θ—a new target for synthetic lethality?

    David Killock
    16 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 12, 125 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2015.23 Author: David Killock Many cancers harbour deficiencies in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair; in particular, aberrations affecting components of the homologous recombination (HR) pathway, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2, and ATM, are common. However, alternate DSB-repair pathways, such as non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), enable these cancers to persist. Agents
  • Biomarkers: Exceptional responders—discovering predictive biomarkers

    Naoko Takebe
    16 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 12, 132 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2015.19 Authors: Naoko Takebe, Lisa McShane & Barbara Conley Modern genomics technologies enable the identification of genetic alterations, even those present at a low frequency, and can contribute to unveiling the mechanistic rationale behind the unexpected clinical response of 'exceptional responders'. This approach will drive the identification of molecular biomarkers that can be integrated into clinical trials and predict response to a specific therapy.
  • Management of locally advanced breast cancer—perspectives and future directions

    Konstantinos Tryfonidis
    9 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 12, 147 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2015.13 Authors: Konstantinos Tryfonidis, Elzbieta Senkus, Maria J. Cardoso & Fatima Cardoso Locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) constitutes a heterogeneous entity that includes advanced-stage primary tumours, cancers with extensive nodal involvement and inflammatory breast carcinomas. Although the definition of LABC can be broadened to include some large operable breast tumours, we use this term to strictly refer
  • Gastrointestinal cancer: ADAM8 provides new hope in pancreatic cancer

    Alessia Errico
    9 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 12, 126 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2015.22 Author: Alessia Errico Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the most common form of pancreatic cancer with high mortality and a 5-year survival rate
  • Urological cancer: Towards rational post-nephrectomy follow-up guidelines in RCC

    Jean-Jacques Patard
    9 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 12, 131 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2015.17 Authors: Jean-Jacques Patard & Bernard Escudier Current guidelines recommend up to 5 years of follow-up assessment for patients with localized renal cell carcinoma treated by nephrectomy; however, the recommendations are supported only by low-level evidence, and a recent study suggests considerably prolonged follow up is needed. Thus, approaches to follow-up imaging assessments and their actual benefit on disease outcome require further clarification.
 
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    Nature Reviews Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Colorectal cancer: Combining drug therapies to improve treatment efficacy in metastatic colorectal cancer

    Isobel Leake
    16 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology 12, 121 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrgastro.2015.29 Author: Isobel Leake Combining targeted therapies could be the way forward to improve treatment of chemorefractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in selected patients, according to findings from a new study.A subset of patients with CRC benefits from therapy targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). However, even
  • Software for enhanced video capsule endoscopy: challenges for essential progress

    Dimitris K. Iakovidis
    16 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology 12, 172 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrgastro.2015.13 Authors: Dimitris K. Iakovidis & Anastasios Koulaouzidis Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) has revolutionized the diagnostic work-up in the field of small bowel diseases. Furthermore, VCE has the potential to become the leading screening technique for the entire gastrointestinal tract. Computational methods that can be implemented in software can enhance the diagnostic yield
  • Gut microbiota: Microbiota organization—a key to understanding CRC development

    Georgina L. Hold
    16 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology 12, 128 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrgastro.2015.25 Authors: Georgina L. Hold & Wendy S. Garrett The gut microbiota has an important role in colorectal cancer (CRC). Dejea and colleagues have demonstrated that particular bacterial biofilms are associated with proximal CRC, correlating with changes in tissue biology associated with oncogenesis. These findings provide a fresh perspective on the microbiota in cancer: microbial organization might provide critical insight into understanding CRC development.
  • IBD: Gut microbiota in IBD goes viral

    Katrina Ray
    9 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology 12, 122 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrgastro.2015.26 Author: Katrina Ray A new study has shown that the enteric virome (the viruses in the gut) is altered in patients with IBD, with disease-specific changes observed between ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.IBD is complex, with multiple factors (including genetic and environmental factors) contributing to disease development.
  • Hepatocellular carcinoma: Working it out—exercise reduces HCC but not steatosis in mice

    Gillian Patman
    9 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology 12, 124 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrgastro.2015.27 Author: Gillian Patman New research published in the Journal of Hepatology has found that in a mouse model of NASH, exercise decreases the size and incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) without improving steatosis.HCC is known to occur on a background of chronic liver disease, and exercise
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    Nature Reviews Nephrology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • The globalization of nephrology

    Susan J. Allison
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Nephrology 11, 125 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrneph.2015.11 Author: Susan J. Allison The medical challenges faced by low-to-middle income countries (LMICs) are vast. Their populations are often disproportionately affected by a high burden of disease owing to a variety of factors including environmental exposures, malnutrition and unhealthy behaviours, exacerbated by a lack of resources and access to
  • HIV-associated nephropathies: epidemiology, pathology, mechanisms and treatment

    Avi Z. Rosenberg
    16 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Nephrology 11, 150 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrneph.2015.9 Authors: Avi Z. Rosenberg, Saraladevi Naicker, Cheryl A. Winkler & Jeffrey B. Kopp HIV is a highly adaptive, rapidly evolving virus, which is associated with renal diseases including collapsing glomerulopathy—the classic histomorphological form of HIV-associated nephropathy. Other nephropathies related to viral factors include HIV-immune-complex kidney disease and thrombotic microangiopathy. The distribution of HIV-associated kidney diseases has changed over
  • Sickle cell disease: renal manifestations and mechanisms

    Karl A. Nath
    9 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Nephrology 11, 161 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrneph.2015.8 Authors: Karl A. Nath & Robert P. Hebbel Sickle cell disease (SCD) substantially alters renal structure and function, and causes various renal syndromes and diseases. Such diverse renal outcomes reflect the uniquely complex vascular pathobiology of SCD and the propensity of red blood cells to sickle in the renal medulla because of its
  • Access to medications and conducting clinical trials in LMICs

    Ikechi G. Okpechi
    9 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Nephrology 11, 189 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrneph.2015.6 Authors: Ikechi G. Okpechi, Charles R. Swanepoel & Francois Venter Access to essential medications is limited in many low-to-middle income countries (LMICs) and those that are available may be prohibitively expensive to the general population. Clinical trials have been suggested as an approach to improve drug access in LMICs but the number of trials conducted
  • Hypertension: Immediate reduction of blood pressure by iliac arteriovenous anastomosis

    Jessica K. Edwards
    9 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Nephrology 11, 126 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrneph.2015.12 Author: Jessica K. Edwards New findings from the ROX CONTROL HTN study show that insertion of a stent-like device in patients with uncontrolled hypertension produces an instant lowering of blood pressure (BP). In their open-label, multicentre, prospective, randomized controlled trial, Melvin Lobo and colleagues assessed the effects of inserting
 
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    Nature Reviews Rheumatology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Epigenetics: Demethylation of IFN-regulated genes in SLE neutrophils

    Sarah Onuora
    16 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Rheumatology 11, 128 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrrheum.2015.14 Author: Sarah Onuora An analysis of the DNA methylome of neutrophils and low-density granulocytes (LDGs) from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has revealed a pattern of demethylation in interferon-signature genes, which, the investigators suggest, could contribute to SLE pathogenesis via Toll-like receptor (TLR)-9 stimulation during NETosis.Using
  • Inflammation: New classification criteria for autoinflammatory periodic fevers

    Nicholas J. Bernard
    16 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Rheumatology 11, 125 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrrheum.2015.15 Author: Nicholas J. Bernard Using data from the Eurofever registry, provisional evidence-based clinical classification criteria for the major monogenic autoinflammatory periodic fevers have been published in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases by the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO). Unlike previous criteria, “The size of the Eurofever registry
  • Bone: Anabolic Wnt/β-catenin signalling: osteocytes are key

    Jenny Buckland
    9 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Rheumatology 11, 128 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrrheum.2015.11 Author: Jenny Buckland “Activation of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signalling exclusively in osteocytes increases both osteoclasts and osteoblasts leading to bone gain, and is sufficient to activate the Notch pathway without affecting survival,” explains Teresita Bellido, lead author on a new Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences paper.
  • Osteoarthritis: Activate autophagy to prevent cartilage degeneration?

    Caroline Barranco
    9 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Rheumatology 11, 127 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrrheum.2015.12 Author: Caroline Barranco Pharmacological activation of autophagy might prevent age-related degenerative changes in cartilage that are associated with osteoarthritis (OA), according to researchers from La Coruña, Spain. Although defective autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction were known to coexist in mouse models of age-related and surgically induced OA, new findings
  • Clinical trials: Glucosamine–chondroitin combo improves knee OA pain

    Sarah Onuora
    2 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Rheumatology 11, 126 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrrheum.2015.9 Author: Sarah Onuora The efficacy of combined chondroitin sulphate plus glucosamine for knee osteoarthritis (OA) is debated, but the suggestion, from analysis of past clinical trials, that a subgroup of patients with moderate to severe pain might benefit from this therapy has now been further explored in the
 
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    Nature Reviews Urology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Neural reconstruction methods of restoring bladder function

    Sandra M. Gomez-Amaya
    9 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Urology 12, 100 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrurol.2015.4 Authors: Sandra M. Gomez-Amaya, Mary F. Barbe, William C. de Groat, Justin M. Brown, Gerald F. Tuite, Jacques Corcos, Susan B. Fecho, Alan S. Braverman & Michael R. Ruggieri During the past century, diverse studies have focused on the development of surgical strategies to restore function of a decentralized bladder after spinal cord or spinal root injury via repair of the original roots or by transferring new axonal sources. The techniques included end-to-end sacral
  • Prostate cancer: New imaging method to improve prostate cancer detection

    Rebecca Kelsey
    19 Jan 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Urology 12, 65 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrurol.2015.2 Author: Rebecca Kelsey A newly developed imaging technique might improve the detection and characterization of prostate cancer and spare some patients from prostate resection, according to a study by collaborators at the University of California San Diego and University of California Los Angeles.“Standard-of-care prostate MRI depends in
  • The microbiome of the urinary tract—a role beyond infection

    Samantha A. Whiteside
    19 Jan 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Urology 12, 81 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrurol.2014.361 Authors: Samantha A. Whiteside, Hassan Razvi, Sumit Dave, Gregor Reid & Jeremy P. Burton Urologists rarely need to consider bacteria beyond their role in infectious disease. However, emerging evidence shows that the microorganisms inhabiting many sites of the body, including the urinary tract—which has long been assumed sterile in healthy individuals—might have a role in maintaining urinary health. Studies
  • Prostate cancer in 2014: The year chemotherapy finally gets some respect!

    Fred Saad
    19 Jan 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Urology 12, 71 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrurol.2014.362 Author: Fred Saad The past 5 years have seen some of the most significant changes in the way we view and treat prostate cancer. 2014 continues in the same spirit and will be remembered as a landmark year for practice changing studies reporting their results in surgery, chemotherapy and novel medical therapies.
  • Kidney cancer in 2014: Key advances promise progress for kidney cancer patients

    Timothy Ito
    19 Jan 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Urology 12, 69 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrurol.2014.356 Authors: Timothy Ito & Alexander Kutikov Kidney cancer research in 2014 was characterized by a diverse array of studies. Advances were made in both the localized and the metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) arenas. Importantly, significant progress was also made in our understanding of the underpinnings of RCC tumorigenesis and progression.
 
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    Naturejobs - Search results

  • Senior Statistician, 6 Month Contract

    4 Mar 2015 | 3:53 am
    Senior Statistician, UK- 6 Month Contract An exciting and rare opportunity has arisen for a Senior Statistician to join the Biometrics team of a global Pharmaceutical company on a contract basis. My client is looking for someone with extensive submissions experience, to take on the challenge of leading multiple studies during clinical studies 0 -III Responsibilities: • Leading the submission process, including writing of documentation • Interaction with regulatory agencies • Defen…
  • Senior Statistician, 12 Month Contract

    4 Mar 2015 | 3:52 am
    Senior Statistician, 12 Month Contract – Netherlands My client, a global leader in Pharmaceuticals is looking for a Senior Statistician to join their team, on a 12 month contract. The role has sole responsibility for vaccine group statistics in clinical trials projects. In this role you will: • Development of clinical protocols, study reports and analysis plans • Product development and statistical analysis • Responsible for statistical and quantitative issues and lead consult…
  • Senior Research Physician

    4 Mar 2015 | 3:50 am
    Senior Research Physician, Netherlands My client, a global leader in Pharmaceutical industry, is looking for an experienced Senior Research Physician to join their Development, Vaccines and Diagnostics department on a permanent basis. This opportunity is based in the Netherlands. Within this role you will: • Be responsible for clinical program, such as key contributor/authorship of clinical documents to include safety and strategy, publications and reports and integrated clinical …
  • Research Associate (Telomeres and Genome Stability)

    4 Mar 2015 | 3:49 am
    Vacancy Number: 3123BR Research Associate (Telomeres and Genome Stability) Institute of Cancer and Genetics School of Medicine, Cardiff University Applications are invited for a Postdoctoral Research Associate position to work on telomeres and genome stability in the laboratory of Professor Duncan Baird based in the Institute of Cancer and Genetics at Cardiff University. The research in the laboratory focuses understanding the mechanistic basis of fusion between short dysfunctional telom…
  • Senior Research Physician – Contract

    4 Mar 2015 | 3:49 am
    Senior Research Physician – Contract, Netherlands My client, a global leader in Pharmaceutical industry, is looking for an experienced Senior Research Physician to join their Development, Vaccines and Diagnostics department on a temporary contract. This opportunity is based in the Netherlands. Within this role you will: • Be responsible for clinical program, such as key contributor/authorship of clinical documents to include safety and strategy, publications and reports and integr…
 
 
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    British Journal of Pharmacology

  • Seven novel modulators of the analgesic target NaV1.7 uncovered using a high-throughput venom-based discovery approach

    Julie K Klint, Jennifer J Smith, Irina Vetter, Darshani B Rupasinghe, Sing Yan Er, Sebastian Senff, Volker Herzig, Mehdi Mobli, Richard J Lewis, Frank Bosmans, Glenn F King
    4 Mar 2015 | 2:58 am
    Background and PurposeChronic pain is a serious worldwide health issue, with current analgesics having limited efficacy and dose-limiting side effects. Humans with loss-of-function mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 (hNaV1.7) are indifferent to pain, making hNaV1.7 a promising target for analgesic development. Since spider venoms are replete with NaV channel modulators, we examined their potential as a source of hNaV1.7 inhibitors. Experimental ApproachWe developed a high-throughput fluorescent-based assay to screen spider venoms against hNaV1.7 and isolate ‘hit’…
  • Divergent effects of the ‘biased’ 5-HT1A receptor agonists F15599 and F13714 in a novel object pattern separation task

    N P Goethem, R Schreiber, A Newman-Tancredi, M Varney, J Prickaerts
    27 Feb 2015 | 5:41 am
    Background and PurposePattern separation, that is, the formation of distinct representations from similar inputs, is an important hippocampal process implicated in cognitive domains like episodic memory. A deficit in pattern separation could lead to memory impairments in several psychiatric and neurological disorders. Hence, mechanisms by which pattern separation can be increased are of potential therapeutic interest. Experimental approach5-HT1A receptors are involved in spatial memory. Herein we tested the ‘biased’ 5-HT1A receptor agonists F15599, which preferentially activates…
  • Cryptotanshinone, an orally bioactive herbal compound from Danshen, attenuates atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice: role of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1)

    Zhiping Liu, Suowen Xu, Xiaoyang Huang, Jiaojiao Wang, Si Gao, Hong Li, Changhua Zhou, Jiantao Ye, Shaorui Chen, Zheng-Gen Jin, Peiqing Liu
    27 Feb 2015 | 5:41 am
    Background and PurposeCryptotanshinone (CTS) is a major bioactive diterpenoid isolated from Danshen, an eminent medicinal herb that is used to treat cardiovascular disorders in Asian medicine. However, it is not known whether CTS can prevent experimental atherosclerosis. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effects of CTS on atherosclerosis and its molecular mechanisms of action. Experimental ApproachApolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE) mice, fed an atherogenic diet, were dosed daily with CTS (15, 45 mg kg−1 day−1) by oral gavage. In vitro studies were carried out…
  • Molecular determinants of positive allosteric modulation of the human metabotropic glutamate receptor 2

    A Farinha, H Lavreysen, L Peeters, B Russo, S Masure, A A Trabanco, J Cid, G Tresadern
    27 Feb 2015 | 5:41 am
    Background and PurposeThe activation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 (mGlu2) reduces glutamatergic transmission in brain regions where excess excitatory signalling is implicated in disorders such as anxiety and schizophrenia. Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) can provide a fine-tuned potentiation of these receptors' function and are being investigated as a novel therapeutic approach. An extensive set of mutant human mGlu2 receptors were used to investigate the molecular determinants that are important for positive allosteric modulation at this receptor. Experimental…
  • Ischaemic conditioning: pitfalls on the path to clinical translation

    Karin Przyklenk
    27 Feb 2015 | 5:40 am
    The development of novel adjuvant strategies capable of attenuating myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion injury and reducing infarct size remains a major, unmet clinical need. A wealth of preclinical evidence has established that ischaemic ‘conditioning’ is profoundly cardioprotective, and has positioned the phenomenon (in particular, the paradigms of postconditioning and remote conditioning) as the most promising and potent candidate for clinical translation identified to date. However, despite this preclinical consensus, current phase II trials have been plagued by heterogeneity, and the…
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    Kidney International - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • The Author Replies:

    Jai Radhakrishnan
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    The Author Replies: Kidney International 87, 664 (March 2015). doi:10.1038/ki.2014.415 Author: Jai Radhakrishnan
  • A tribute to Hai-yan Wang (1937–2014)

    Ming-hui Zhao
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    A tribute to Hai-yan Wang (1937–2014) Kidney International 87, 489 (March 2015). doi:10.1038/ki.2015.1 Author: Ming-hui Zhao
  • Chronic kidney disease and intensive glycemic control increase cardiovascular risk in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Vasilios Papademetriou
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Chronic kidney disease and intensive glycemic control increase cardiovascular risk in patients with type 2 diabetes Kidney International 87, 649 (March 2015). doi:10.1038/ki.2014.296 Authors: Vasilios Papademetriou, Laura Lovato, Michael Doumas, Eric Nylen, Amy Mottl, Robert M Cohen, William B Applegate, Zubin Puntakee, Jean Francois Yale & William C Cushman
  • Journal Club

    26 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Journal Club Kidney International 87, 490 (March 2015). doi:10.1038/ki.2015.24
  • The urinary proteome and metabonome differ from normal in adults with mitochondrial disease

    Andrew M Hall
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    The urinary proteome and metabonome differ from normal in adults with mitochondrial disease Kidney International 87, 610 (March 2015). doi:10.1038/ki.2014.297 Authors: Andrew M Hall, Annalisa Vilasi, Isabel Garcia-Perez, Marta Lapsley, Charlotte L Alston, Robert D S Pitceathly, Robert McFarland, Andrew M Schaefer, Doug M Turnbull, Nick J Beaumont, Justin J Hsuan, Pedro R Cutillas, John C Lindon, Elaine Holmes, Robert J Unwin, Robert W Taylor, Grainne S Gorman, Shamima Rahman & Michael G Hanna
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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