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  • ESKAPEing the labyrinth of antibacterial discovery

    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery - AOP - nature.com science feeds
    Ruben Tommasi
    2 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery. doi:10.1038/nrd4572 Authors: Ruben Tommasi, Dean G. Brown, Grant K. Walkup, John I. Manchester & Alita A. Miller
  • SLC transporters as therapeutic targets: emerging opportunities

    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery - AOP - nature.com science feeds
    Lawrence Lin
    25 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery. doi:10.1038/nrd4626 Authors: Lawrence Lin, Sook Wah Yee, Richard B. Kim & Kathleen M. Giacomini
  • How BP’s $18.7-billion oil-spill settlement could help the Gulf of Mexico

    NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
    Richard Monastersky
    2 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Marine scientist Don Boesch on the fight to restore ecosystems damaged by the Deepwater Horizon disaster.Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2015.17911
  • Light detective

    Nature - Issue - nature.com science feeds
    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Light detective Nature 523, 7558 (2015). doi:10.1038/523006a Smartphone camera set to come to the aid of sleuths, scientists and wine lovers.
  • Lenalidomide induces ubiquitination and degradation of CK1α in del(5q) MDS

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    Jan Krönke
    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 01 July 2015. doi:10.1038/nature14610 Authors: Jan Krönke, Emma C. Fink, Paul W. Hollenbach, Kyle J. MacBeth, Slater N. Hurst, Namrata D. Udeshi, Philip P. Chamberlain, D. R. Mani, Hon Wah Man, Anita K. Gandhi, Tanya Svinkina, Rebekka K. Schneider, Marie McConkey, Marcus Järås, Elizabeth Griffiths, Meir Wetzler, Lars Bullinger, Brian E. Cathers, Steven A. Carr, Rajesh Chopra & Benjamin L. Ebert
 
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    Nature - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Light detective

    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Light detective Nature 523, 7558 (2015). doi:10.1038/523006a Smartphone camera set to come to the aid of sleuths, scientists and wine lovers.
  • Gene politics

    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Gene politics Nature 523, 7558 (2015). doi:10.1038/523005b US lawmakers are asserting their place in the human genetic-modification debate.
  • Be prepared: Europe needs Ebola outbreak consortium

    Alimuddin Zumla
    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Be prepared: Europe needs Ebola outbreak consortium Nature 523, 7558 (2015). doi:10.1038/523035b Authors: Alimuddin Zumla, David Heymann & Giuseppe Ippolito The European Commission (EC) has been criticized for failing to define specific research pathways for tackling the recent outbreak of Ebola virus in West Africa (J. M.Martin-Morenoet al. Lancet384, 1259; 2014). In our view, three changes would
  • Neuroscience: Male mice process pain differently

    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Neuroscience: Male mice process pain differently Nature 523, 7558 (2015). doi:10.1038/523009c Male and female mice use different types of immune cell to process chronic pain.Studies of male mice have shown that immune cells called microglia in the spinal cord have an important role in chronic pain. To see whether this is the same in female
  • Atmospheric science: Air pollution triggers floods

    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Atmospheric science: Air pollution triggers floods Nature 523, 7558 (2015). doi:10.1038/523008a A catastrophic 2013 flood in China was probably caused, in part, by air pollution.In July 2013, heavy rainfall resulted in a devastating flood in the mountains northwest of the Sichuan Basin in China (pictured). The basin has seen increasing industrial activity in the past
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  • Lenalidomide induces ubiquitination and degradation of CK1α in del(5q) MDS

    Jan Krönke
    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 01 July 2015. doi:10.1038/nature14610 Authors: Jan Krönke, Emma C. Fink, Paul W. Hollenbach, Kyle J. MacBeth, Slater N. Hurst, Namrata D. Udeshi, Philip P. Chamberlain, D. R. Mani, Hon Wah Man, Anita K. Gandhi, Tanya Svinkina, Rebekka K. Schneider, Marie McConkey, Marcus Järås, Elizabeth Griffiths, Meir Wetzler, Lars Bullinger, Brian E. Cathers, Steven A. Carr, Rajesh Chopra & Benjamin L. Ebert
  • Developmental biology: Nanotubes in the niche

    Thomas B. Kornberg
    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 01 July 2015. doi:10.1038/nature14631 Authors: Thomas B. Kornberg & Lilach Gilboa In fruit flies, protrusions can extend from stem cells in the testes to cells in a regulatory hub, mediating intercellular signalling and stem-cell maintenance. The implications of this finding are presented here from two angles.
  • Nanotubes mediate niche–stem-cell signalling in the Drosophila testis

    Mayu Inaba
    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 01 July 2015. doi:10.1038/nature14602 Authors: Mayu Inaba, Michael Buszczak & Yukiko M. Yamashita Stem cell niches provide resident stem cells with signals that specify their identity. Niche signals act over a short range such that only stem cells but not their differentiating progeny receive the self-renewing signals. However, the cellular mechanisms that limit niche signalling to stem cells remain poorly understood. Here we show that the Drosophila male germline stem cells form previously unrecognized structures, microtubule-based nanotubes, which…
  • Protistology: How to build a microbial eye

    Thomas A. Richards
    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 01 July 2015. doi:10.1038/nature14630 Authors: Thomas A. Richards & Suely L. Gomes Dissection of the subcellular eye of microorganisms called warnowiid dinoflagellates reveals that this structure is composed of elements of two cellular organelles — the plastid and the mitochondrion.
  • Eye-like ocelloids are built from different endosymbiotically acquired components

    Gregory S. Gavelis
    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature advance online publication 01 July 2015. doi:10.1038/nature14593 Authors: Gregory S. Gavelis, Shiho Hayakawa, Richard A. White III, Takashi Gojobori, Curtis A. Suttle, Patrick J. Keeling & Brian S. Leander Multicellularity is often considered a prerequisite for morphological complexity, as seen in the camera-type eyes found in several groups of animals. A notable exception exists in single-celled eukaryotes called dinoflagellates, some of which have an eye-like ‘ocelloid’ consisting of subcellular analogues to a cornea, lens, iris, and retina. These planktonic cells are…
 
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    Nature Biotechnology - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • Flexible guide-RNA design for CRISPR applications using Protospacer Workbench

    Cameron Ross MacPherson
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3291 Authors: Cameron Ross MacPherson & Artur Scherf
  • Chemically modified guide RNAs enhance CRISPR-Cas genome editing in human primary cells

    Ayal Hendel
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3290 Authors: Ayal Hendel, Rasmus O Bak, Joseph T Clark, Andrew B Kennedy, Daniel E Ryan, Subhadeep Roy, Israel Steinfeld, Benjamin D Lunstad, Robert J Kaiser, Alec B Wilkens, Rosa Bacchetta, Anya Tsalenko, Douglas Dellinger, Laurakay Bruhn & Matthew H Porteus CRISPR-Cas-mediated genome editing relies on guide RNAs that direct site-specific DNA cleavage facilitated by the Cas endonuclease. Here we report that chemical alterations to synthesized single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) enhance genome editing efficiency in human primary T cells and CD34+…
  • Kinetic fingerprinting to identify and count single nucleic acids

    Alexander Johnson-Buck
    21 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3246 Authors: Alexander Johnson-Buck, Xin Su, Maria D Giraldez, Meiping Zhao, Muneesh Tewari & Nils G Walter
  • Lineage conversion induced by pluripotency factors involves transient passage through an iPSC stage

    Ori Bar-Nur
    21 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3247 Authors: Ori Bar-Nur, Cassandra Verheul, Andreia G Sommer, Justin Brumbaugh, Benjamin A Schwarz, Inna Lipchina, Aaron J Huebner, Gustavo Mostoslavsky & Konrad Hochedlinger Brief expression of pluripotency-associated factors such as Oct4, Klf4, Sox2 and c-Myc (OKSM), in combination with differentiation-inducing signals, has been reported to trigger transdifferentiation of fibroblasts into other cell types. Here we show that OKSM expression in mouse fibroblasts gives rise to both induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and induced neural stem cells…
  • Optogenetics for in vivo cardiac pacing and resynchronization therapies

    Udi Nussinovitch
    21 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Biotechnology. doi:10.1038/nbt.3268 Authors: Udi Nussinovitch & Lior Gepstein Abnormalities in the specialized cardiac conduction system may result in slow heart rate or mechanical dyssynchrony. Here we apply optogenetics, widely used to modulate neuronal excitability, for cardiac pacing and resynchronization. We used adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9 to express the Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) transgene at one or more ventricular sites in rats. This allowed optogenetic pacing of the hearts at different beating frequencies with blue-light illumination both in vivo and in isolated…
 
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    Nature Cell Biology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Corrigenda: Kinetochore components are required for central spindle assembly

    Gilliane Maton
    29 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Cell Biology 17, 953 (2015). doi:10.1038/ncb3199 Author: Gilliane Maton, Frances Edwards, Benjamin Lacroix, Marine Stefanutti, Kimberley Laband, Tiffany Lieury, Taekyung Kim, Julien Espeut, Julie C. Canman & Julien Dumont
  • Super-resolution links vinculin localization to function in focal adhesions

    Grégory Giannone
    29 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Cell Biology 17, 845 (2015). doi:10.1038/ncb3196 Author: Grégory Giannone Integrin-based focal adhesions integrate biochemical and biomechanical signals from the extracellular matrix and the actin cytoskeleton. The combination of three-dimensional super-resolution imaging and loss- or gain-of-function protein mutants now links the nanoscale dynamic localization of proteins to their activation and function within focal adhesions.
  • Corrigenda: MCUR1 is an essential component of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake that regulates cellular metabolism

    Karthik Mallilankaraman
    29 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Cell Biology 17, 953 (2015). doi:10.1038/ncb3202 Author: Karthik Mallilankaraman, César Cárdenas, Patrick J. Doonan, Harish C. Chandramoorthy, Krishna M. Irrinki, Tünde Golenár, György Csordás, Priyanka Madireddi, Jun Yang, Marioly Müller, Russell Miller, Jill E. Kolesar, Jordi Molgó, Brett Kaufman, György Hajnóczky, J. Kevin Foskett & Muniswamy Madesh
  • Rubicon swaps autophagy for LAP

    Keith B. Boyle
    29 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Cell Biology 17, 843 (2015). doi:10.1038/ncb3197 Authors: Keith B. Boyle & Felix Randow Phagocytic cells engulf their prey into vesicular structures called phagosomes, of which a certain proportion becomes demarcated for enhanced maturation by a process called LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP). Light has now been shed on the molecular requirements of LAP, establishing a central role for the protein Rubicon in the immune response to Aspergillus fumigatus.
  • How cells coordinate waste removal through their major proteolytic pathways

    Sascha Martens
    29 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Cell Biology 17, 841 (2015). doi:10.1038/ncb3198 Authors: Sascha Martens & Andreas Bachmair The eukaryotic cell uses two complex machineries to degrade unwanted proteins. The first is the ubiquitin–proteasome system and the second is autophagy. A new study contributes to our understanding of how the two systems interconnect to coordinate protein degradation.
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    Nature Chemical Biology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Epigenomics: QC for ChIP

    Terry L. Sheppard
    16 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 11, 449 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1853 Author: Terry L. Sheppard
  • Antibiotic resistance mechanisms: WTAs get tailored

    Mirella Bucci
    16 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 11, 448 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1851 Author: Mirella Bucci
  • Iron-sulfur proteins hiding in plain sight

    Tracey A Rouault
    16 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 11, 442 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1843 Author: Tracey A Rouault Recent studies suggest that iron-sulfur (Fe-S) proteins may be unexpectedly abundant and functionally diverse in mammalian cells, but their identification still remains difficult. The use of informatics along with traditional spectroscopic analyses could be key to discovering new Fe-S proteins and validating their functional roles.
  • Interactomics: Connecting the dots

    Joshua M. Finkelstein
    16 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 11, 449 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1855 Author: Joshua M. Finkelstein
  • Voices of chemical biology

    16 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology 11, 446 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchembio.1845 We asked a collection of chemical biologists: “What would you say have been the most important historical contributions of chemical biology to broader areas of science”?
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    Nature Chemical Biology - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • Structural basis of enzymatic benzene ring reduction

    Tobias Weinert
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology. doi:10.1038/nchembio.1849 Authors: Tobias Weinert, Simona G Huwiler, Johannes W Kung, Sina Weidenweber, Petra Hellwig, Hans-Joachim Stärk, Till Biskup, Stefan Weber, Julien J H Cotelesage, Graham N George, Ulrich Ermler & Matthias Boll
  • 5-Formylcytosine can be a stable DNA modification in mammals

    Martin Bachman
    21 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology. doi:10.1038/nchembio.1848 Authors: Martin Bachman, Santiago Uribe-Lewis, Xiaoping Yang, Heather E Burgess, Mario Iurlaro, Wolf Reik, Adele Murrell & Shankar Balasubramanian 5-Formylcytosine (5fC) is a rare base found in mammalian DNA and thought to be involved in active DNA demethylation. Here, we show that developmental dynamics of 5fC levels in mouse DNA differ from those of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), and using stable isotope labeling in vivo, we show that 5fC can be a stable DNA modification. These results suggest that 5fC has functional roles in DNA that…
  • Structural analysis of leader peptide binding enables leader-free cyanobactin processing

    Jesko Koehnke
    21 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology. doi:10.1038/nchembio.1841 Authors: Jesko Koehnke, Greg Mann, Andrew F Bent, Hannes Ludewig, Sally Shirran, Catherine Botting, Tomas Lebl, Wael E Houssen, Marcel Jaspars & James H Naismith
  • Control of carotenoid biosynthesis through a heme-based cis-trans isomerase

    Jesús Beltrán
    14 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology. doi:10.1038/nchembio.1840 Authors: Jesús Beltrán, Brian Kloss, Jonathan P Hosler, Jiafeng Geng, Aimin Liu, Anuja Modi, John H Dawson, Masanori Sono, Maria Shumskaya, Charles Ampomah-Dwamena, James D Love & Eleanore T Wurtzel
  • Chemical pulldown reveals dynamic pseudouridylation of the mammalian transcriptome

    Xiaoyu Li
    14 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemical Biology. doi:10.1038/nchembio.1836 Authors: Xiaoyu Li, Ping Zhu, Shiqing Ma, Jinghui Song, Jinyi Bai, Fangfang Sun & Chengqi Yi
 
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    Nature Chemistry

  • Stereoselective synthesis: Molecular editing of carbohydrates

    Andrew McNally
    22 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry 7, 539 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchem.2289 Author: Andrew McNally Deoxygenation reactions have been used to convert biomass-derived carbohydrates into useful platform chemicals. Now, a method has been described that can selectively excise C–O bonds to produce valuable chiral synthons.
  • Dynamic covalent chemistry: Tales from the cryptates

    Stuart Cantrill
    22 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry 7, 536 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchem.2297 Author: Stuart Cantrill
  • Toxic thallium

    Anders Lennartson
    22 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry 7, 610 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchem.2286 Author: Anders Lennartson Anders Lennartson ponders on the contribution of thallium to society, since its main characteristic is its toxicity.
  • Polymer folding: A right tangle

    Claire Hansell
    22 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry 7, 536 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchem.2299 Author: Claire Hansell
  • Corrigendum: Orthogonal tandem catalysis

    Tracy L. Lohr
    22 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry 7, 608 (2015). doi:10.1038/nchem.2293 Author: Tracy L. Lohr & Tobin J. Marks
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    Nature Chemistry

  • Quantum interference between H + D2 quasiclassical reaction mechanisms

    Pablo G. Jambrina
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2295 Authors: Pablo G. Jambrina, Diego Herráez-Aguilar, F. Javier Aoiz, Mahima Sneha, Justinas Jankunas & Richard N. Zare Often reactions can be described by classical mechanics; however, this is prohibited in cases in which quantum phenomena emerge. Now angular distributions measured for the H + D2 reaction have been seen to display characteristic oscillation patterns in backward scattering — theory shows that they are caused by quantum interferences between classical mechanisms similar to those found in the double-slit experiment.
  • Enzymatic hydroxylation of an unactivated methylene C–H bond guided by molecular dynamics simulations

    Alison R. H. Narayan
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2285 Authors: Alison R. H. Narayan, Gonzalo Jiménez-Osés, Peng Liu, Solymar Negretti, Wanxiang Zhao, Michael M. Gilbert, Raghunath O. Ramabhadran, Yun-Fang Yang, Lawrence R. Furan, Zhe Li, Larissa M. Podust, John Montgomery, K. N. Houk & David H. Sherman The reactivity of a monooxygenase (P450 PikC) has been modified through protein and substrate engineering, and applied to the oxidation of unactivated methylene C–H bonds. The protein engineering was guided by using molecular dynamics and quantum mechanical calculations to develop a predictive model…
  • An oxazetidine amino acid for chemical protein synthesis by rapid, serine-forming ligations

    Ivano Pusterla
    21 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2282 Authors: Ivano Pusterla & Jeffrey W. Bode The total chemical synthesis of large proteins requires the development of methodology that rapidly couples unprotected peptide fragments. Here a highly strained four-membered-ring amino acid is described that enables such couplings by the formation of serine residues.
  • Diels–Alderase-free, bis-pericyclic, [4+2] dimerization in the biosynthesis of (±)-paracaseolide A

    Tao Wang
    21 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Chemistry. doi:10.1038/nchem.2281 Authors: Tao Wang & Thomas R. Hoye The facile, spontaneous dimerization of a simple alkenylbutenolide monomer is relevant to the biosynthesis of racemic paracaseolide A. As supported by computation, a fully (C2-)symmetric, bis-pericyclic Diels–Alder cycloaddition transition state structure is invoked to account for the atypical exo-selectivity and room-temperature reactivity.
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    Nature Genetics - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Sweet size control in tomato

    Andrew Fleming
    25 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 47, 698 (2015). doi:10.1038/ng.3345 Author: Andrew Fleming All cells of an adult plant are ultimately derived from divisions that occur in small groups of cells distributed throughout the plant, termed meristems. A new study shows that carbohydrate post-translational modification of a peptide signal influences meristem and, as a consequence, fruit size in tomato.
  • The European Genome-phenome Archive of human data consented for biomedical research

    Ilkka Lappalainen
    25 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 47, 692 (2015). doi:10.1038/ng.3312 Authors: Ilkka Lappalainen, Jeff Almeida-King, Vasudev Kumanduri, Alexander Senf, John Dylan Spalding, Saif ur-Rehman, Gary Saunders, Jag Kandasamy, Mario Caccamo, Rasko Leinonen, Brendan Vaughan, Thomas Laurent, Francis Rowland, Pablo Marin-Garcia, Jonathan Barker, Petteri Jokinen, Angel Carreño Torres, Jordi Rambla de Argila, Oscar Martinez Llobet, Ignacio Medina, Marc Sitges Puy, Mario Alberich, Sabela de la Torre, Arcadi Navarro, Justin Paschall & Paul Flicek
  • Double trouble in human aneuploidy

    Miguel A Brieño-Enríquez
    25 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 47, 696 (2015). doi:10.1038/ng.3344 Authors: Miguel A Brieño-Enríquez & Paula E Cohen Crossing over, or reciprocal recombination, is essential for accurate segregation of homologous chromosomes at the first meiotic division, resulting in gametes containing the correct chromosome number. A new study in human oocytes analyzes the genome-wide recombination and segregation patterns in all the products of female meiosis, providing experimental support for existing theories about the origin of human aneuploidies and highlighting a novel reverse segregation mechanism of…
  • Lipid transport and human brain development

    Christer Betsholtz
    25 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 47, 699 (2015). doi:10.1038/ng.3348 Author: Christer Betsholtz How the human brain rapidly builds up its lipid content during brain growth and maintains its lipids in adulthood has remained elusive. Two new studies show that inactivating mutations in MFSD2A, known to be expressed specifically at the blood-brain barrier, lead to microcephaly, thereby offering a simple and surprising solution to an old enigma.
  • Corrigendum: Induction, suppression and requirement of RNA silencing pathways in virulent Agrobacterium tumefaciens infections

    Patrice Dunoyer
    25 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics 47, 847 (2015). doi:10.1038/ng0715-847 Author: Patrice Dunoyer, Christophe Himber & Olivier Voinnet
 
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  • Relapsed neuroblastomas show frequent RAS-MAPK pathway mutations

    Thomas F Eleveld
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics. doi:10.1038/ng.3333 Authors: Thomas F Eleveld, Derek A Oldridge, Virginie Bernard, Jan Koster, Leo Colmet Daage, Sharon J Diskin, Linda Schild, Nadia Bessoltane Bentahar, Angela Bellini, Mathieu Chicard, Eve Lapouble, Valérie Combaret, Patricia Legoix-Né, Jean Michon, Trevor J Pugh, Lori S Hart, JulieAnn Rader, Edward F Attiyeh, Jun S Wei, Shile Zhang, Arlene Naranjo, Julie M Gastier-Foster, Michael D Hogarty, Shahab Asgharzadeh, Malcolm A Smith, Jaime M Guidry Auvil, Thomas B K Watkins, Danny A Zwijnenburg, Marli E Ebus, Peter van Sluis, Anne Hakkert, Esther van…
  • Rare A2ML1 variants confer susceptibility to otitis media

    Regie Lyn P Santos-Cortez
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics. doi:10.1038/ng.3347 Authors: Regie Lyn P Santos-Cortez, Charlotte M Chiong, Ma Rina T Reyes-Quintos, Ma Leah C Tantoco, Xin Wang, Anushree Acharya, Izoduwa Abbe, Arnaud P Giese, Joshua D Smith, E Kaitlynn Allen, Biao Li, Eva Maria Cutiongco-de la Paz, Marieflor Cristy Garcia, Erasmo Gonzalo D V Llanes, Patrick John Labra, Teresa Luisa I Gloria-Cruz, Abner L Chan, Gao T Wang, Kathleen A Daly, Jay Shendure, Michael J Bamshad, Deborah A Nickerson, Janak A Patel, Saima Riazuddin, Michele M Sale, Tasnee Chonmaitree, Zubair M Ahmed, Generoso T Abes & Suzanne M Leal A…
  • Mutational dynamics between primary and relapse neuroblastomas

    Alexander Schramm
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics. doi:10.1038/ng.3349 Authors: Alexander Schramm, Johannes Köster, Yassen Assenov, Kristina Althoff, Martin Peifer, Ellen Mahlow, Andrea Odersky, Daniela Beisser, Corinna Ernst, Anton G Henssen, Harald Stephan, Christopher Schröder, Lukas Heukamp, Anne Engesser, Yvonne Kahlert, Jessica Theissen, Barbara Hero, Frederik Roels, Janine Altmüller, Peter Nürnberg, Kathy Astrahantseff, Christian Gloeckner, Katleen De Preter, Christoph Plass, Sangkyun Lee, Holger N Lode, Kai-Oliver Henrich, Moritz Gartlgruber, Frank Speleman, Peter Schmezer, Frank Westermann, Sven…
  • The support of human genetic evidence for approved drug indications

    Matthew R Nelson
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics. doi:10.1038/ng.3314 Authors: Matthew R Nelson, Hannah Tipney, Jeffery L Painter, Judong Shen, Paola Nicoletti, Yufeng Shen, Aris Floratos, Pak Chung Sham, Mulin Jun Li, Junwen Wang, Lon R Cardon, John C Whittaker & Philippe Sanseau
  • Consistent in-frame internal tandem duplications of BCOR characterize clear cell sarcoma of the kidney

    Hitomi Ueno-Yokohata
    21 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Genetics. doi:10.1038/ng.3338 Authors: Hitomi Ueno-Yokohata, Hajime Okita, Keiko Nakasato, Shingo Akimoto, Jun-ichi Hata, Tsugumichi Koshinaga, Masahiro Fukuzawa & Nobutaka Kiyokawa Clear cell sarcoma of the kidney (CCSK) is one of the major pediatric renal neoplasms, but its associated genetic abnormalities are largely unknown. We identified internal tandem duplications in the BCOR gene (BCL6 corepressor) affecting the C terminus in 100% (20/20) of CCSK tumors but in none (0/193) of the other pediatric renal tumors. CCSK tumors expressed only an aberrant BCOR allele, indicating a…
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    Nature Geoscience - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • Carbon mobilized at shallow depths in subduction zones by carbonatitic liquids

    Stefano Poli
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2464 Author: Stefano Poli More than half a gigaton of CO2 is subducted into Earth’s interior each year. At least 40% of this CO2 is returned to the atmosphere by arc volcanism. Processes that are known to release carbon from subducting slabs—decarbonation or carbonate dissolution in fluids—can account for only a portion of the CO2 released at arc volcanoes. Carbonatitic liquids may form from the subducting crust, but are thought to form only at very high temperatures. Melting of carbonated rocks could restrict the subduction of carbon into…
  • Initiation of the Lusi mudflow disaster

    M. R. P. Tingay
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2472 Authors: M. R. P. Tingay, M. L. Rudolph, M. Manga, R. J. Davies & Chi-Yuen Wang
  • Marine biogeochemistry: A tropical hotspot

    Imke Grefe
    21 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2473 Author: Imke Grefe The ocean is an important source of the potent greenhouse gas N2O. Measurements in the tropical South Pacific have revealed a massive efflux of N2O from the coastal upwelling zone.
  • Earthquakes: The rise and fall of an island

    Aron J. Meltzner
    21 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2477 Author: Aron J. Meltzner Earth's crust was thought to deform uniformly over most of the seismic cycle. Analysis of two centuries of nautical surveys from Chile reveals temporal variability that complicates our view of time-dependent seismic hazards.
  • Geochemistry: Rise of the continents

    Cin-Ty A. Lee
    21 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2476 Authors: Cin-Ty A. Lee & N. Ryan McKenzie The continents are archives of Earth's evolution. Analysis of the isotopic signature of continental crust globally suggests that buoyant, silicic continents began to form 3 billion years ago, possibly linked to the onset of plate tectonics.
 
 
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    Nature Materials - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • In situ study of the initiation of hydrogen bubbles at the aluminium metal/oxide interface

    De-Gang Xie
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4336 Authors: De-Gang Xie, Zhang-Jie Wang, Jun Sun, Ju Li, Evan Ma & Zhi-Wei Shan The presence of excess hydrogen at the interface between a metal substrate and a protective oxide can cause blistering and spallation of the scale. However, it remains unclear how nanoscale bubbles manage to reach the critical size in the first place. Here, we perform in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy experiments of the aluminium metal/oxide interface under hydrogen exposure. It is found that once the interface is weakened by hydrogen segregation,…
  • A kirigami approach to engineering elasticity in nanocomposites through patterned defects

    Terry C. Shyu
    21 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4327 Authors: Terry C. Shyu, Pablo F. Damasceno, Paul M. Dodd, Aaron Lamoureux, Lizhi Xu, Matthew Shlian, Max Shtein, Sharon C. Glotzer & Nicholas A. Kotov Efforts to impart elasticity and multifunctionality in nanocomposites focus mainly on integrating polymeric and nanoscale components. Yet owing to the stochastic emergence and distribution of strain-concentrating defects and to the stiffening of nanoscale components at high strains, such composites often possess unpredictable strain–property relationships. Here, by taking inspiration from…
  • In situ NMR and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance techniques reveal the structure of the electrical double layer in supercapacitors

    John M. Griffin
    21 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4318 Authors: John M. Griffin, Alexander C. Forse, Wan-Yu Tsai, Pierre-Louis Taberna, Patrice Simon & Clare P. Grey
  • Dynamic polymer systems with self-regulated secretion for the control of surface properties and material healing

    Jiaxi Cui
    21 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4325 Authors: Jiaxi Cui, Daniel Daniel, Alison Grinthal, Kaixiang Lin & Joanna Aizenberg Approaches for regulated fluid secretion, which typically rely on fluid encapsulation and release from a shelled compartment, do not usually allow a fine continuous modulation of secretion, and can be difficult to adapt for monitoring or function-integration purposes. Here, we report self-regulated, self-reporting secretion systems consisting of liquid-storage compartments in a supramolecular polymer-gel matrix with a thin liquid layer on top, and demonstrate that…
  • Potential-dependent dynamic fracture of nanoporous gold

    Shaofeng Sun
    21 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Materials. doi:10.1038/nmat4335 Authors: Shaofeng Sun, Xiying Chen, Nilesh Badwe & Karl Sieradzki When metallic alloys are exposed to a corrosive environment, porous nanoscale morphologies spontaneously form that can adversely affect the mechanical integrity of engineered structures. This form of stress-corrosion cracking is responsible for the well-known ‘season cracking’ of brass and stainless steel components in nuclear power generating stations. One explanation for this is that a high-speed crack is nucleated within the porous layer, which subsequently injects…
 
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    Nature Methods - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • Protein structure determination by combining sparse NMR data with evolutionary couplings

    Yuefeng Tang
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3455 Authors: Yuefeng Tang, Yuanpeng Janet Huang, Thomas A Hopf, Chris Sander, Debora S Marks & Gaetano T Montelione Accurate determination of protein structure by NMR spectroscopy is challenging for larger proteins, for which experimental data are often incomplete and ambiguous. Evolutionary sequence information together with advances in maximum entropy statistical methods provide a rich complementary source of structural constraints. We have developed a hybrid approach (evolutionary coupling–NMR spectroscopy; EC-NMR) combining sparse NMR data with…
  • Assembly and diploid architecture of an individual human genome via single-molecule technologies

    Matthew Pendleton
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3454 Authors: Matthew Pendleton, Robert Sebra, Andy Wing Chun Pang, Ajay Ummat, Oscar Franzen, Tobias Rausch, Adrian M Stütz, William Stedman, Thomas Anantharaman, Alex Hastie, Heng Dai, Markus Hsi-Yang Fritz, Han Cao, Ariella Cohain, Gintaras Deikus, Russell E Durrett, Scott C Blanchard, Roger Altman, Chen-Shan Chin, Yan Guo, Ellen E Paxinos, Jan O Korbel, Robert B Darnell, W Richard McCombie, Pui-Yan Kwok, Christopher E Mason, Eric E Schadt & Ali Bashir
  • Assessment of a method to characterize antibody selectivity and specificity for use in immunoprecipitation

    Edyta Marcon
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3472 Authors: Edyta Marcon, Harshika Jain, Anandi Bhattacharya, Hongbo Guo, Sadhna Phanse, Shuye Pu, Gregory Byram, Ben C Collins, Evan Dowdell, Maria Fenner, Xinghua Guo, Ashley Hutchinson, Jacob J Kennedy, Bryan Krastins, Brett Larsen, Zhen-Yuan Lin, Mary F Lopez, Peter Loppnau, Shane Miersch, Tin Nguyen, Jonathan B Olsen, Marcin Paduch, Mani Ravichandran, Alma Seitova, Gouri Vadali, Maryann S Vogelsang, Jeffrey R Whiteaker, Guoqing Zhong, Nan Zhong, Lei Zhao, Ruedi Aebersold, Cheryl H Arrowsmith, Andrew Emili, Lori Frappier, Anne-Claude Gingras, Matthias…
  • Single-nucleotide-resolution mapping of m6A and m6Am throughout the transcriptome

    Bastian Linder
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3453 Authors: Bastian Linder, Anya V Grozhik, Anthony O Olarerin-George, Cem Meydan, Christopher E Mason & Samie R Jaffrey
  • Combining protein and mRNA quantification to decipher transcriptional regulation

    Heng Xu
    21 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3446 Authors: Heng Xu, Leonardo A Sepúlveda, Lauren Figard, Anna Marie Sokac & Ido Golding We combine immunofluorescence and single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH), followed by automated image analysis, to quantify the concentration of nuclear transcription factors, number of transcription factors bound, and number of nascent mRNAs synthesized at individual gene loci. A theoretical model is used to decipher how transcription factor binding modulates the stochastic kinetics of mRNA production. We demonstrate this approach by…
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    Nature Nanotechnology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • DNA nanotechnology: Measuring chloride in live cells

    Masayuki Endo
    2 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 10, 569 (2015). doi:10.1038/nnano.2015.142 Authors: Masayuki Endo & Hiroshi Sugiyama A nucleic acid-based chloride sensor is used to image and quantify spatiotemporal chloride transport in the living cell.
  • Quick lessons on environmental nanotech

    Chris Toumey
    2 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 10, 566 (2015). doi:10.1038/nnano.2015.144 Author: Chris Toumey The use of silver nanoparticles to clean clothes and the use of magnetite nanoparticles to clean water provide contrasting illustrations of the potential environmental consequences of nanotechnology, as Chris Toumey explains.
  • Our choice from the recent literature

    2 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 10, 568 (2015). doi:10.1038/nnano.2015.150
  • Spintronics: Skyrmions under strain

    Robert Ritz
    2 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 10, 573 (2015). doi:10.1038/nnano.2015.146 Author: Robert Ritz The high sensitivity of magnetic skyrmions to mechanical deformation of the underlying crystal lattice provides a new tuning parameter for potential applications of these nanosized spin whirls.
  • Catalysis by clusters with precise numbers of atoms

    Eric C. Tyo
    2 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Nanotechnology 10, 577 (2015). doi:10.1038/nnano.2015.140 Authors: Eric C. Tyo & Stefan Vajda
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    Nature Neuroscience - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Go with your gut: microbiota meet microglia

    Kira Irving Mosher
    24 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 18, 930 (2015). doi:10.1038/nn.4051 Authors: Kira Irving Mosher & Tony Wyss-Coray Discovering the environmental factors that control microglia is key to understanding and managing brain health. A new study finds that microbiota in the gut are essential to the regulation of microglial maturation and activation.
  • How amyloid, sleep and memory connect

    Brendan P Lucey
    24 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 18, 933 (2015). doi:10.1038/nn.4048 Authors: Brendan P Lucey & David M Holtzman In a bidirectional relationship, the sleep/wake cycle regulates amyloid-β (Aβ) levels and Aβ accumulation then disrupts sleep. A quantitative three-way model now suggests that Aβ impairs memory via its effect on sleep.
  • Genetic variation links creativity to psychiatric disorders

    Matthew C Keller
    24 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 18, 928 (2015). doi:10.1038/nn.4047 Authors: Matthew C Keller & Peter M Visscher Epidemiological studies and anecdotal evidence show overlap between psychiatric disorders and creativity, but why? A new study uses genome-wide association data from schizophrenia and bipolar disorder to show that genetics are part of the explanation.
  • MIR137: big impacts from small changes

    Jinju Han
    24 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 18, 931 (2015). doi:10.1038/nn.4045 Authors: Jinju Han, Anindita Sarkar & Fred H Gage Schizophrenia-linked single nucleotide polymorphisms in MIR137 alter expression of miR-137 in neurons. Abnormal expression of miR-137 affects vesicle release at presynaptic terminals and in turn alters hippocampal functioning.
  • Molecular mechanisms governing Ca2+ regulation of evoked and spontaneous release

    Ralf Schneggenburger
    24 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Neuroscience 18, 935 (2015). doi:10.1038/nn.4044 Authors: Ralf Schneggenburger & Christian Rosenmund
 
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    Nature Photonics - AOP - nature.com science feeds

  • Room-temperature lasing in a single nanowire with quantum dots

    Jun Tatebayashi
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Photonics. doi:10.1038/nphoton.2015.111 Authors: Jun Tatebayashi, Satoshi Kako, Jinfa Ho, Yasutomo Ota, Satoshi Iwamoto & Yasuhiko Arakawa Semiconductor nanowire lasers are promising as ultrasmall, highly efficient coherent light emitters in the fields of nanophotonics, nano-optics and nanobiotechnology. Although there have been several demonstrations of nanowire lasers using homogeneous bulk gain materials or multi-quantum-wells/disks, it is crucial to incorporate lower-dimensional quantum nanostructures into the nanowire to achieve superior device performance in relation to…
  • Harnessing high-dimensional hyperentanglement through a biphoton frequency comb

    Zhenda Xie
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Photonics. doi:10.1038/nphoton.2015.110 Authors: Zhenda Xie, Tian Zhong, Sajan Shrestha, XinAn Xu, Junlin Liang, Yan-Xiao Gong, Joshua C. Bienfang, Alessandro Restelli, Jeffrey H. Shapiro, Franco N. C. Wong & Chee Wei Wong
  • Spatial Kramers–Kronig relations and the reflection of waves

    S. A. R. Horsley
    21 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Photonics. doi:10.1038/nphoton.2015.106 Authors: S. A. R. Horsley, M. Artoni & G. C. La Rocca When a planar dielectric medium has a permittivity profile that is an analytic function in the upper or lower half of the complex position plane x = x′ + ix″ then the real and imaginary parts of its permittivity are related by the spatial Kramers–Kronig relations. We find that such a medium will not reflect radiation incident from one side, whatever the angle of incidence. Using the spatial Kramers–Kronig relations, one can derive a real part of a permittivity profile from…
  • Computational high-resolution optical imaging of the living human retina

    Nathan D. Shemonski
    21 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Photonics. doi:10.1038/nphoton.2015.102 Authors: Nathan D. Shemonski, Fredrick A. South, Yuan-Zhi Liu, Steven G. Adie, P. Scott Carney & Stephen A. Boppart High-resolution in vivo imaging is of great importance for the fields of biology and medicine. The introduction of hardware-based adaptive optics (HAO) has pushed the limits of optical imaging, enabling high-resolution near diffraction-limited imaging of previously unresolvable structures. In ophthalmology, when combined with optical coherence tomography, HAO has enabled a detailed three-dimensional visualization of…
  • Macroscopic and direct light propulsion of bulk graphene material

    Tengfei Zhang
    14 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Photonics. doi:10.1038/nphoton.2015.105 Authors: Tengfei Zhang, Huicong Chang, Yingpeng Wu, Peishuang Xiao, Ningbo Yi, Yanhong Lu, Yanfeng Ma, Yi Huang, Kai Zhao, Xiao-Qing Yan, Zhi-Bo Liu, Jian-Guo Tian & Yongsheng Chen
 
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    Nature Physics - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Topological superconductivity: Edging closer

    Luke Fleet
    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics 11, 523 (2015). doi:10.1038/nphys3399 Author: Luke Fleet
  • The truth phalanx

    Milena Wazeck
    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics 11, 518 (2015). doi:10.1038/nphys3317 Author: Milena Wazeck The history of the fierce opposition met by Einstein's theory of relativity in the 1920s teaches us that public controversies about science are not necessarily settled by sound scientific reasoning.
  • Supernovae: Lone star states

    May Chiao
    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics 11, 523 (2015). doi:10.1038/nphys3397 Author: May Chiao
  • Anthropic attitudes

    Mark Buchanan
    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics 11, 520 (2015). doi:10.1038/nphys3388 Author: Mark Buchanan
  • Exhibition: Patterns in the dark

    Iulia Georgescu
    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics 11, 522 (2015). doi:10.1038/nphys3391 Author: Iulia Georgescu & Federico Levi
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  • High-harmonic generation: Drive round the twist

    Minhaeng Cho
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3395 Author: Minhaeng Cho Light has long been used to detect the chirality of molecules but high-order harmonic generation now provides access to these chiral interactions on ultrafast timescales.
  • Multiple scattering: Unravelling the tangle

    Jacopo Bertolotti
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3389 Author: Jacopo Bertolotti The discovery of a new correlation between the incident field and the laser speckle created by multiple scattering takes us a step closer to imaging in turbid media.
  • Probing molecular chirality on a sub-femtosecond timescale

    R. Cireasa
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3369 Authors: R. Cireasa, A. E. Boguslavskiy, B. Pons, M. C. H. Wong, D. Descamps, S. Petit, H. Ruf, N. Thiré, A. Ferré, J. Suarez, J. Higuet, B. E. Schmidt, A. F. Alharbi, F. Légaré, V. Blanchet, B. Fabre, S. Patchkovskii, O. Smirnova, Y. Mairesse & V. R. Bhardwaj Chiral molecules that are non-superimposable mirror images of each other, known as enantiomers, have identical chemical and physical properties unless they interact with another chiral entity, such as chiral light. Chiroptical effects arising from such interactions are used…
  • Translation correlations in anisotropically scattering media

    Benjamin Judkewitz
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3373 Authors: Benjamin Judkewitz, Roarke Horstmeyer, Ivo M. Vellekoop, Ioannis N. Papadopoulos & Changhuei Yang
  • Pressure is not a state function for generic active fluids

    A. P. Solon
    28 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Physics. doi:10.1038/nphys3377 Authors: A. P. Solon, Y. Fily, A. Baskaran, M. E. Cates, Y. Kafri, M. Kardar & J. Tailleur
 
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    Nature Reviews Cancer - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Probing for a deeper understanding of rhabdomyosarcoma: insights from complementary model systems

    Venkatesh P. Kashi
    23 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 15, 426 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrc3961 Authors: Venkatesh P. Kashi, Mark E. Hatley & Rene L. Galindo Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a mesenchymal malignancy composed of neoplastic primitive precursor cells that exhibit histological features of myogenic differentiation. Despite intensive conventional multimodal therapy, patients with high-risk RMS typically suffer from aggressive disease. The lack of directed therapies against RMS emphasizes the need to further
  • The tumour microenvironment after radiotherapy: mechanisms of resistance and recurrence

    Holly E. Barker
    23 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 15, 409 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrc3958 Authors: Holly E. Barker, James T. E. Paget, Aadil A. Khan & Kevin J. Harrington Radiotherapy plays a central part in curing cancer. For decades, most research on improving treatment outcomes has focused on modulating radiation-induced biological effects on cancer cells. Recently, we have better understood that components within the tumour microenvironment have pivotal roles in determining treatment outcomes. In
  • Haematological malignancies: Splicing the MDS genome

    Gemma K. Alderton
    23 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 15, 393 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrc3975 Author: Gemma K. Alderton Three papers now present different aspects of a similar story: altered splicing can lead to myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and even to progression to acute myeloid leukaemia (AML).
  • Forging a signature of in vivo senescence

    Norman E. Sharpless
    23 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 15, 397 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrc3960 Authors: Norman E. Sharpless & Charles J. Sherr 'Cellular senescence', a term originally defining the characteristics of cultured cells that exceed their replicative limit, has been broadened to describe durable states of proliferative arrest induced by disparate stress factors. Proposed relationships between cellular senescence, tumour suppression, loss of tissue regenerative capacity and ageing
  • RNA splicing: MYC maintains high-fidelity splicing

    Sarah Seton-Rogers
    17 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cancer 15, 385 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrc3977 Author: Sarah Seton-Rogers One way that MYC promotes lymphomagenesis is through maintaining correct pre-mRNA splicing.
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    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Should the FDA disclose complete response letters?

    Asher Mullard
    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 14, 449 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrd4686 Author: Asher Mullard Companies rarely adequately disclose the rationale for drug rejections, shows a US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) analysis of complete response letters. Press releases not only often omit key details about rejections — such as the need for more clinical trials or increased mortality in
  • A β-lactamase inhibitor revival provides new hope for old antibiotics

    Ken Garber
    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 14, 445 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrd4666 Author: Ken Garber Novel inhibitors of bacterial β-lactamases should restore activity to old antibiotics and hold back the tide of drug-resistant infections.
  • FDA approves two IBS drugs

    Asher Mullard
    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 14, 449 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrd4688 Author: Asher Mullard In May, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved two drugs for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhoea.One approval went to eluxadoline, which was developed by Actavis (which last month rebranded itself as Allergan). Eluxadoline is a mixed opioid receptor agonist that acts
  • The NASH drug dash

    Kelly Rae Chi
    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 14, 447 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrd4667 Author: Kelly Rae Chi Intercept Pharmaceuticals has announced plans for the first ever pivotal trial in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), setting a high bar for a growing pipeline of drugs against the liver disease.
  • Robust biotech sector increases R&D spend

    Asher Mullard
    30 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 14, 449 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrd4687 Author: Asher Mullard The biotech sector increased its research and development (R&D) spending to US$35.4 billion in 2014, up 14% from $29.4 million in 2013, shows the latest Ernst & Young Biotechnology Industry Report. This increase brings biotech R&D spending back above spending levels in 2008, before
 
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    Nature Reviews Genetics - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Pathogen genetics: Rapid typing of S. Enteritidis clinical isolates

    Orli G. Bahcall
    17 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 377 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg3975 Author: Orli G. Bahcall Quick et al. demonstrate the benefits of rapidly available and accurate prospective typing results during the course of an outbreak of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) in Birmingham, United Kingdom, in June 2014. The authors obtained 43
  • Genome stability: Chromothripsis and micronucleus formation

    Denise Waldron
    17 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 376 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg3970 Author: Denise Waldron It has generally been assumed that cancers arise through the accumulation of individual mutations over time; however, recent cancer genome sequence analyses suggest that multiple mutations can arise simultaneously during a single event such as chromothripsis, which results in extensive genomic rearrangements that are usually
  • Genetic testing: Clinical whole-genome sequencing

    Orli G. Bahcall
    17 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 377 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg3973 Author: Orli G. Bahcall Taylor et al. consider the utility of whole-genome sequencing for diagnosis of genetic disorders in routine clinical practice as part of the WGS500 project to sequence the whole genomes of 500 patients. The authors examine whole-genome sequencing data from 217 individuals (including 156 independent
  • Marine microbiology: Deep sequencing of the global oceans

    Cláudio Nunes-Alves
    17 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 378 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg3971 Author: Cláudio Nunes-Alves Microorganisms have central roles in biogeochemical processes in marine environments, but our understanding of the composition of these communities and the ecological factors that determine community structure on a global scale is limited. Now, 5 studies report the initial findings of the international Tara Oceans
  • Human evolution: Out-of-Africa migration routes

    Orli G. Bahcall
    17 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Genetics 16, 377 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrg3974 Author: Orli G. Bahcall The migration route of modern humans out of Africa into Europe and Asia 50,000–100,000 years ago has remained an unresolved question, with conflicting historical, archaeological and genetic evidence for either a Northern (via Egypt and Sinai) or Southern (via Ethiopia and the Arabian Peninsula) route.
 
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    Nature Reviews Immunology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Immunological memory: γδ T cells reach out

    Elisabeth Kugelberg
    24 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 15, 403 (2015). doi:10.1038/nri3883 Author: Elisabeth Kugelberg In this study, Cyster and colleagues investigated whether a population of migratory mouse dermal γδ T cells that produce interleukin-17 (IL-17) and express the T cell receptor Vγ4 can develop immune memory. Following local imiquimod treatment — which induces skin inflammation — the authors found
  • Monocytes: Pre-emptive regulation

    Lucy Bird
    24 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 15, 403 (2015). doi:10.1038/nri3881 Author: Lucy Bird The current paradigm suggests that monocyte fate and function are dictated by local signals at the site of infection. However, new data indicate that monocyte education begins in the bone marrow. Askenase et al. noted that as early as 4 days after an acute
  • Genetic susceptibility to invasive Salmonella disease

    James J. Gilchrist
    24 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 15, 452 (2015). doi:10.1038/nri3858 Authors: James J. Gilchrist, Calman A. MacLennan & Adrian V. S. Hill Invasive Salmonella disease, in the form of enteric fever and invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease, causes substantial morbidity and mortality in children and adults in the developing world. The study of genetic variations in humans and mice that influence susceptibility of the host
  • B cells: Mediators of central tolerance

    Olive Leavy
    24 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 15, 404 (2015). doi:10.1038/nri3879 Author: Olive Leavy Thymic B cells directly present self-antigen for T cell negative selection.
  • Innate immunity: New PAMP discovered

    Olive Leavy
    24 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Immunology 15, 402 (2015). doi:10.1038/nri3880 Author: Olive Leavy HBP is a pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) from Gram-negative bacteria that promotes immunity following cytosolic detection.
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    Nature Reviews Microbiology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Viral evolution: Global patterns of influenza circulation

    Christina Tobin Kåhrström
    14 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 399 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3518 Author: Christina Tobin Kåhrström Understanding the factors that influence the circulation of seasonal influenza viruses is a major public health challenge. By analysing 9,604 viral haemagglutinin (HA) sequences from the 2 influenza A subtypes H1N1 and H3N2, and the 2 influenza B viruses Yamagata and Victoria (all of which
  • Broad-spectrum antivirals against viral fusion

    Frederic Vigant
    14 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 426 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3475 Authors: Frederic Vigant, Nuno C. Santos & Benhur Lee Effective antivirals have been developed against specific viruses, such as HIV, Hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. This 'one bug–one drug' approach to antiviral drug development can be successful, but it may be inadequate for responding to an increasing diversity of viruses that cause significant
  • Microbiome: Gut bacteria feed a healthy brain

    Denise Waldron
    14 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 399 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3516 Author: Denise Waldron The tissue macrophages of the central nervous system (CNS), known as microglia, are essential for normal brain development and maintenance of the innate immune response of the CNS; however, the factors that control their maturation and activation have been unclear. Now, Erny et al.
  • Bacterial gene import and mesophilic adaptation in archaea

    Purificación López-García
    14 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 447 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3485 Authors: Purificación López-García, Yvan Zivanovic, Philippe Deschamps & David Moreira It is widely believed that the archaeal ancestor was hyperthermophilic, but during archaeal evolution, several lineages — including haloarchaea and their sister methanogens, the Thaumarchaeota, and the uncultured Marine Group II and Marine Group III Euryarchaeota (MGII/III) — independently adapted to lower temperatures. Recent phylogenomic
  • Genome watch: Adaptation: it's a bug's race

    Arporn Wangwiwatsin
    14 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Microbiology 13, 401 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrmicro3514 Authors: Arporn Wangwiwatsin & Anna V. Protasio This month's Genome Watch highlights studies that investigate links between Wolbachia genotypes and their phenotypes, and explore how Wolbachia adapts to new host environments.
 
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    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Chromosomes: Finding the right size

    Kim Baumann
    22 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 16, 390 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrm4020 Author: Kim Baumann Cell and nucleus size vary dramatically between developmental stages, cell types and species. During metazoan early development, embryos do not increase in volume, and cell divisions result in smaller cells. Mitotic spindle length, centrosome size and nuclear size are known to scale with cell size.
  • RNA metabolism: Methyladenosine promotes translation

    Eytan Zlotorynski
    22 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 16, 390 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrm4018 Author: Eytan Zlotorynski N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is the most common eukaryotic internal mRNA modification. Wang et al. show that the m6A reader YTHDF1 promotes the translation of methylated mRNAs in human cells. Transcriptome-wide analyses indicated that YTHDF1 recognizes m6A on
  • Splicing: Unmasking exitrons

    Eytan Zlotorynski
    22 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 16, 390 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrm4019 Author: Eytan Zlotorynski Kalyna and colleagues characterized protein-coding exonic sequences that can undergo alternative splicing, which they termed exonic introns (exitrons; previously termed cryptic introns). They defined >1,000 exitrons in >3% of Arabidopsis thaliana coding genes, including in many genes annotated as intron-less, and found that they
  • Techniques: microRNA switches to isolate specific cells

    Kim Baumann
    22 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 16, 391 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrm4022 Author: Kim Baumann For many cell types, no specific cell-surface markers that would facilitate their isolation have been identified. In this study, Miki et al. describe a method to isolate specific cell types on the basis of their endogenous microRNA (miRNA) activity. The authors designed 'miRNA switches',
  • Cell adhesion: Sticking three cells together

    Kim Baumann
    22 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 16, 391 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrm4021 Author: Kim Baumann Luschnig and colleagues have identified a new component of Drosophila melanogaster tricellular junctions (TCJs), Anakonda (Aka), which is specifically required for TCJ assembly. TCJs connect epithelial cells where the corners of three adjacent cells meet and are important for cytoskeletal organization and epithelial barrier
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    Nature Reviews Neuroscience - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • The neuroscience of placebo effects: connecting context, learning and health

    Tor D. Wager
    18 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 403 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrn3976 Authors: Tor D. Wager & Lauren Y. Atlas Placebo effects are beneficial effects that are attributable to the brain–mind responses to the context in which a treatment is delivered rather than to the specific actions of the drug. They are mediated by diverse processes — including learning, expectations and social cognition — and
  • Crosstalk between the nociceptive and immune systems in host defence and disease

    Stephen B. McMahon
    18 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 389 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrn3946 Authors: Stephen B. McMahon, Federica La Russa & David L. H. Bennett Nociceptors and immune cells both protect the host from potential threats to homeostasis. There is growing evidence for bidirectional signalling between these two systems, and the underlying mechanisms are beginning to be elucidated. An understanding is emerging of how both the adaptive and innate immune
  • Stress-related synaptic plasticity in the hypothalamus

    Jaideep S. Bains
    18 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 377 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrn3881 Authors: Jaideep S. Bains, Jaclyn I. Wamsteeker Cusulin & Wataru Inoue Stress necessitates an immediate engagement of multiple neural and endocrine systems. However, exposure to a single stressor causes adaptive changes that modify responses to subsequent stressors. Recent studies examining synapses onto neuroendocrine cells in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus demonstrate that stressful experiences leave
  • Synaptic plasticity: Micro-level disruption

    Darran Yates
    18 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 373 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrn3989 Author: Darran Yates A study shows that elevated levels of the microRNA encoded by the schizophrenia-linked gene mir-137 impair presynaptic plasticity and hippocampus-dependent learning and memory in mice.
  • Depression: A receptor for resilience

    Fiona Carr
    16 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 376 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrn3985 Author: Fiona Carr The role of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) in depression-like behaviour is unclear, as pro-depressive and antidepressive functions for this receptor have been described. Shin et al. found that mice lacking mGluR5 were more susceptible to depression-like behaviour after stress. Targeted re-expression of mGluR5
 
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    Nature Reviews Cardiology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Device therapy: Where next in cardiogenic shock owing to myocardial infarction?

    Daniel Burkhoff
    8 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 12, 383 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2015.81 Author: Daniel Burkhoff Intra-aortic balloon pumping has recently been shown to be ineffective in treating cardiogenic shock due to myocardial infarction. Other, more potent percutaneous pumps have been developed, and their use is growing substantially, but they have not been studied in randomized trials. Two new reports provide provocative information about these devices.
  • Device therapy: Remote monitoring—the benefits of keeping in touch

    Robert Phillips
    1 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 12, 380 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2015.85 Author: Robert Phillips Technological developments now enable wireless, automated data collection and transmission from cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs), reducing the need for intrusive in-person evaluations (IPEs). Communication of information relating to device function and cardiovascular parameters can potentially enable more-effective interventions by health-care providers. However, these benefits
  • Risk factors: Hand grip strength predicts cardiovascular risk

    Bryony M. Mearns
    1 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 12, 379 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2015.84 Author: Bryony M. Mearns Grip strength—the force exerted when an individual squeezes an object as tightly as possible with their hands—is an easy, quick, and cheap way to measure muscle strength. In an analysis of data for almost 140,000 individuals enrolled in the multinational Prospective Urban-Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study,
  • Atrial fibrillation: Uninterrupted oral anticoagulation in patients undergoing catheter ablation

    Bryony M. Mearns
    1 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 12, 381 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2015.86 Author: Bryony M. Mearns Historically, oral vitamin K antagonist (VKA) treatment has been interrupted in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who are undergoing catheter ablation, and heparin has been used to bridge the gap. However, studies published over the past 5 years have indicated that uninterrupted oral VKA-mediated anticoagulation
  • Coronary artery disease: Complex association between height and CHD—size matters

    Pekka J. Karhunen
    25 May 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Cardiology 12, 385 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrcardio.2015.80 Authors: Pekka J. Karhunen & Tuula Meinander Meta-analyses and large population-based studies have linked shorter body height with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). This complex association is now confirmed at the gene level, indicating that genetic variants affecting body height and associated with short stature seem to have independent roles as risk factors for CHD.
 
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    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Advances in targeted therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma in the genomic era

    Josep M. Llovet
    8 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 12, 408 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2015.103 Authors: Josep M. Llovet, Augusto Villanueva, Anja Lachenmayer & Richard S. Finn Mortality owing to liver cancer has increased in the past 20 years, and the latest estimates indicate that the global health burden of this disease will continue to grow. Most patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are still diagnosed at intermediate or advanced disease stages, where
  • Cervical cancer: Squamocolumnar junction ablation—tying up loose ends?

    Michael Herfs
    1 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 12, 378 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2015.104 Authors: Michael Herfs & Christopher P. Crum Despite the commercialization of HPV vaccines, cervical cancer remains a major cause of death, especially in developing countries. Recent data implicate a discrete population of cells within the cervical squamocolumnar junction in the pathogenesis of cervical precancerous lesions, indicating that ablation of these cells might reduce the rate of cervical cancer in high-risk populations.
  • Haematological cancer: Bortezomib in MCL—new standard of care or just another option?

    Martin Dreyling
    25 May 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 12, 376 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2015.101 Author: Martin Dreyling In a recent international phase III trial, addition of bortezomib to a R-CHOP-like immunochemotherapy regimen for the first-line treatment of mantle-cell lymphoma resulted in a clinically meaningful extension of median progression-free survival. This finding emphasizes the role of targeted therapies in a relatively chemotherapy-refractory disease; however, therapeutic recommendations have to consider the observed haematotoxicity of this combination.
  • Surgery: Green light given for laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer

    Steven D. Wexner
    25 May 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 12, 375 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2015.100 Author: Steven D. Wexner Randomized trial data support the use of laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer; however, such evidence was lacking for rectal cancer. Now, the COLOR II randomized trial gives minimally invasive resection of rectal cancer the 'green light', answering the question 'should laparoscopic surgery be used?' The new key question is 'who should be performing laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer?'
  • Colorectal cancer: POLR2A deletion with TP53 opens a window of opportunity for therapy

    Alessia Errico
    18 May 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 12, 374 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2015.94 Author: Alessia Errico Inactivation of the guardian of the genome, the tumour suppressor protein p53, is common in most human tumours. Despite tremendous efforts, no effective therapy aimed at restoring p53 activity has been successfully translated into the clinic. Now, Xiongbin Lu and colleagues highlight that co-depletion of
 
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    Nature Reviews Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Hepatitis: After HCV cure, HBV cure?

    Julie Lucifora
    22 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology 12, 376 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrgastro.2015.103 Authors: Julie Lucifora & Christian Trepo Current treatments efficiently control chronic HBV infection but they do not lead to its elimination. Now, Ebert and colleagues have shown that cellular inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (cIAPs) prevent TNF-mediated killing of infected hepatocytes and that cIAP antagonists might lead to HBV cure by promoting death of infected cells.
  • Colorectal cancer: Liquid biopsy enables real-time monitoring of molecular alterations in CRC

    Katrina Ray
    15 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology 12, 372 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrgastro.2015.105 Author: Katrina Ray Liquid biopsy—tracking circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) in blood samples—can be used to genotype and monitor the molecular evolution of colorectal cancer (CRC), according to a new study. The approach can be used to monitor patients with CRC in real-time, enabling the identification of drug resistance
  • Motility: Is 'ICC-opathy' present in gastroparesis-like syndrome?

    Mohammad Bashashati
    15 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology 12, 375 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrgastro.2015.96 Authors: Mohammad Bashashati & Richard W. McCallum The impact of chronic nausea and vomiting on quality of life and economic burden are substantial. New findings show that interstitial cells of Cajal are depleted or have ultrastructural changes in patients with chronic nausea and vomiting who have normal gastric emptying. Abnormalities of the gastric slow waves were also observed.
  • IBD: Indication extrapolation for anti-TNF biosimilars

    Niels Vande Casteele
    15 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology 12, 373 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrgastro.2015.104 Authors: Niels Vande Casteele & William J. Sandborn Biosimilar monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to TNF are being developed that are highly similar, but not identical to the innovator molecules. CT-P13, a biosimilar of infliximab, is the first anti-TNF mAb to get approval in South Korea, Europe and Canada. However, uncertainties remain about indication extrapolation and interchangeability.
  • Colorectal cancer: Combination treatment for refractory colorectal cancer

    8 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology 12, 370 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrgastro.2015.102 In a phase III randomized placebo-controlled trial, it has been found that TAS-102 improves overall survival in patients with refractory metastatic colorectal cancer. TAS-102 consists of trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride. In total, 800 patients were assigned to receive either TAS-102 or placebo at a 2:1
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    Nature Reviews Nephrology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Cardiovascular disease: Cholesterol absorption and statin effectiveness

    8 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Nephrology 11, 386 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrneph.2015.91 Variations in cholesterol absorption rates affect the ability of atorvastatin to reduce cardiovascular risk in patients on haemodialysis, according to new research. In a post hoc analysis of 1,030 participants from the 4D study, Silbernagel and colleagues stratified patients by their cholestanol-to-cholesterol ratio—a biomarker
  • Anaemia in kidney disease: harnessing hypoxia responses for therapy

    Mark J. Koury
    8 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Nephrology 11, 394 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrneph.2015.82 Authors: Mark J. Koury & Volker H. Haase Improved understanding of the oxygen-dependent regulation of erythropoiesis has provided new insights into the pathogenesis of anaemia associated with renal failure and has led to the development of novel therapeutic agents for its treatment. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2 is a key regulator of erythropoiesis and iron
  • Acute kidney injury: PLA2 and cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury

    8 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Nephrology 11, 386 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrneph.2015.93 Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) ameliorates cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury by modulating inflammatory responses, say researchers. Kim et al. found that administration of PLA2 to mice increased the population of T regulatory cells and secretion of IL-10 in the kidney. Importantly, the anticancer effects of
  • Nephrotoxicity: Effects of lithium on renal and thyroid function

    8 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Nephrology 11, 386 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrneph.2015.90 Patients who are to start lithium treatment should have baseline measures of renal, thyroid and parathyroid function as well as regular long-term monitoring, conclude the authors of a new study. In their retrospective analysis, Shine et al. found that lithium use was associated
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus: Analysis of antibody-secreting cells in SLE

    8 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Nephrology 11, 386 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrneph.2015.92 The properties of antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) and the contribution of these cells to serum autoantibodies during flares of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) activity are unknown. New findings by Tipton et al. show that circulating ASCs that are present during SLE flares are highly
 
 
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    Nature Reviews Rheumatology - Issue - nature.com science feeds

  • Connective tissue diseases: Large intergenic noncoding RNA linked to disease activity and organ damage in SLE

    João H. Duarte
    8 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Rheumatology 11, 384 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrrheum.2015.82 Author: João H. Duarte Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), including large intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs), are mRNA-like molecules with no functional open reading frames that can regulate immunological processes. Wu et al. now show that linc0949 expression is inversely associated with disease activity and organ damage in
  • Rheumatoid arthritis: Manipulating the FLS 'proteoglycan switch' could offer a new approach to RA therapy

    Sarah Onuora
    8 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Rheumatology 11, 381 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrrheum.2015.78 Author: Sarah Onuora The invasiveness and migration of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) in arthritis is regulated by a phosphatase-dependent 'proteoglycan switch', and pharmacological manipulation of this mechanism could offer a way to directly target these important effector cells, according to new research reported in Science Translational Medicine. The
  • Spondyloarthropathies: EULAR recommendations reflect advances in imaging

    John D. Reveille
    8 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Rheumatology 11, 388 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrrheum.2015.80 Author: John D. Reveille Substantial advances have been made in the field of imaging in spondyloarthritis, with respect to both the techniques themselves and their applications, but how should clinicians and radiologists make the most of these developments? New recommendations from EULAR could provide valuable guidance.
  • Connective tissue diseases: Watchful waiting strategy for patients with SSc-ILD

    1 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Rheumatology 11, 382 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrrheum.2015.76 A retrospective cohort study (n = 151) has found that a watch-and-wait strategy can be an effective approach for deciding when to start immunosuppressive therapy in patients newly diagnosed with systemic sclerosis-associated interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD). Patients treated or not treated with immunosuppressive
  • Rheumatoid arthritis: Link between RA and cardiovascular disease risk

    1 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Nature Reviews Rheumatology 11, 382 (2015). doi:10.1038/nrrheum.2015.77 Data from >160,000 postmenopausal women included in the Women's Health Initiative indicate that women with RA are at 1.5–2.5-fold higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality over 10 years compared with women without RA (outcomes assessed included coronary heart disease, stroke, CVD, fatal
 
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    Naturejobs - Search results

  • Research Technician – Biophysical Characterization

    4 Jul 2015 | 12:15 am
    Job Description The European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) is one of the highest ranked scientific research organisations in the world. The Headquarters Laboratory is located in Heidelberg (Germany), with additional sites in Grenoble (France), Hamburg (Germany), Hinxton (UK) and Monterotondo (Italy). The European Molecular Biology Laboratory’s Outstation in Hamburg offers an international and stimulating environment for structural molecular biology research. It operates three highly ...
  • Postdoctoral Fellow - Svergun Group

    4 Jul 2015 | 12:15 am
    Job Description The European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) is one of the highest ranked scientific research organisations in the world. The Headquarters Laboratory is located in Heidelberg (Germany), with additional sites in Grenoble (France), Hamburg (Germany), Hinxton (UK) and Monterotondo (Italy). The EMBL Hamburg Outstation at the DESY campus performs research in structural biology with specific emphasis on the use of synchrotron radiation. EMBL Hamburg runs two macromolecular cr...
  • ESPOD Fellowship - Project 1

    4 Jul 2015 | 12:15 am
    Position Details EMBL-EBI and Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute share the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus. This proximity fosters close collaborations and contributes to an international and vibrant campus environment. Researchers are supported by easy access to scientific expertise, well-equipped facilities and an active seminar programme. The EMBL-EBI–Sanger Postdoctoral (ESPOD) Programme builds on the strong collaborative relationship between the two institutes, offering projects which combin...
  • Database Biocurator

    4 Jul 2015 | 12:15 am
    Job Description We are seeking an expert Database Biocurator to join the Protein Families team on the Rfam project (http://rfam.xfam.org) at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBI-EBI) which is located on the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus near Cambridge in the UK on a part-time basis (20 hours per week). The Rfam database is the world leading compendium of non-coding RNA families, which is run from within the Protein Families Team, led by Rob Finn.  The Database Curator will be expecte...
  • ESPOD Fellowship - Project 2

    4 Jul 2015 | 12:15 am
    Position Details EMBL-EBI and Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute share the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus. This proximity fosters close collaborations and contributes to an international and vibrant campus environment. Researchers are supported by easy access to scientific expertise, well-equipped facilities and an active seminar programme. The EMBL-EBI–Sanger Postdoctoral (ESPOD) Programme builds on the strong collaborative relationship between the two institutes, offering projects which combin...
 
 
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    British Journal of Pharmacology

  • Tissue-specific up-regulation of arginase I and II induced by p38 MAPK mediates endothelial dysfunction in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    J Pernow, A Kiss, Y Tratsiakovich, B Climent
    3 Jul 2015 | 4:08 am
    Abstract Background and purposeEmerging evidence suggests a selective up-regulation of arginase I in diabetes causing coronary artery disease; however the mechanisms behind this up-regulation are still unknown. Activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) has been reported to increase arginase II in various cardiovascular diseases. We therefore tested the role of p38 MAPK in the regulation of arginase I and II expression and its impact on endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. Experimental approachEndothelial function was determined in septal coronary (SCA), left anterior…
  • Dysregulated post-transcriptional control of COX-2 gene expression in gestational diabetic endothelial cells

    Luigia Di Francesco, Melania Dovizio, Annalisa Trenti, Emanuela Marcantoni, Ashleigh Moore, Peadar O′ Gaora, Cathal McCarthy, Stefania Tacconelli, Annalisa Bruno, Sara Alberti, Salvatore Gizzo, Giovanni Battista Nardelli, Genny Orso, Orina Belton, Lucia Trevisi, Dan A. Dixon, Paola Patrignani
    3 Jul 2015 | 4:07 am
    Abstract Background and purposeHyperglycemic memory describes the progression of diabetic complications during subsequent periods of improved glycemia.We addressed the hypothesis that transient hyperglycemia causes aberrant cyclooxygenase(COX)-2 expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells(HUVEC) in response to interleukin(IL)-1β through the induction of long-lasting epigenetic changes involving microRNA-16(miR-16), a post-transcriptional modulator of COX-2 expression. Experimental approach and key resultsStudies were performed in HUVEC collected from gestational diabetes…
  • Synergistic effect of targeting epidermal growth factor receptor and hyaluronan synthesis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells

    I Kretschmer, T Freudenberger, S Twarock, J W Fischer
    3 Jul 2015 | 4:04 am
    Abstract Background and PurposeWorldwide, esophageal cancer is the eighth most common cancer and has a very poor survival rate. In order to identify new tolerable treatment options for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), erlotinib was tested with moderate efficacy in phase I and II studies. As 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU), an hyaluronan (HA) synthesis inhibitor showed anti-cancer effects in vitro and in ESCC xenograft tumors, we investigated if the effects of erlotinib and 4-MU could be augmented by combination. Experimental ApproachESCC cell lines were treated with erlotinib or…
  • Enantioselective inhibition of D-serine transport by (S)-ketamine

    Nagendra S. Singh, Michel Bernier, Simonetta Camandola, Mohammed A. Khadeer, Ruin Moaddel, Mark P. Mattson, Irving W. Wainer
    3 Jul 2015 | 4:04 am
    Abstract Background and purposePatients with major depressive disorder receiving racemic ketamine, (R,S)-ketamine, experience transient increases in Clinician-Administered Dissociative States Scale (CADDS) scores and coincident drop in plasma D-serine levels. The results suggest that (R,S)-ketamine produces an immediate, concentration-dependent pharmacological effect on D-serine plasma concentrations. One potential source of this effect is the (R,S)-ketamine-induced inhibition of the alanine-serine-cysteine transporter (ASCT2), which regulates intracellular D-serine concentrations. In this…
  • The novel PAR2 ligand C391 blocks multiple PAR2 signaling pathways in vitro and in vivo

    Scott Boitano, Justin Hoffman, Andrea N. Flynn, Marina N. Asiedu, Dipti V. Tillu, Zhenyu Zhang, Cara L. Sherwood, Candy M. Rivas, Kathryn DeFea, Josef Vagner, Theodore J. Price
    3 Jul 2015 | 4:04 am
    Abstract BACKGROUND AND PURPOSEProteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) is a G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR) linked to diverse pathologies including acute and chronic pain. PAR2 is one of four PARs that are activated by proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular amino terminus resulting in an exposed, tethered peptide agonist. Several high potency and efficacious peptide and peptidomimetic agonists have been developed to probe PAR2 function in vitro and in vivo. However, few similarly potent and efficacious antagonists have been described. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACHWe modified the peptidomimetic…
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    Journal of Human Genetics

  • Genetic mutations in human rectal cancers detected by targeted sequencing

    Jun Bai
    1 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Genetic mutations in human rectal cancers detected by targeted sequencing Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, July 2 2015. doi:10.1038/jhg.2015.71 Authors: Jun Bai, Jinglong Gao, Zhijun Mao, Jianhua Wang, Jianhui Li, Wensheng Li, Yu Lei, Shuaishuai Li, Zhuo Wu, Chuanning Tang, Lindsey Jones, Hua Ye, Feng Lou, Zhiyuan Liu, Zhishou Dong, Baishuai Guo, Xue F Huang, Si-Yi Chen & Enke Zhang
  • Molecular genetics of coronary artery disease

    Kouichi Ozaki
    1 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Molecular genetics of coronary artery disease Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, July 2 2015. doi:10.1038/jhg.2015.70 Authors: Kouichi Ozaki & Toshihiro Tanaka
  • A commentary on fine mapping and resequencing of the PARK16 locus in Parkinson’s disease

    Joanne Trinh
    1 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    A commentary on fine mapping and resequencing of the PARK16 locus in Parkinson’s disease Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, July 2 2015. doi:10.1038/jhg.2015.76 Authors: Joanne Trinh, Carles Vilariño-Güell & Owen A Ross
  • GIGYF2 mutation in late-onset Parkinson’s disease with cognitive impairment

    Javier Ruiz-Martinez
    1 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    GIGYF2 mutation in late-onset Parkinson’s disease with cognitive impairment Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, July 2 2015. doi:10.1038/jhg.2015.69 Authors: Javier Ruiz-Martinez, Catharine E Krebs, Vladimir Makarov, Ana Gorostidi, Jose Félix Martí-Massó & Coro Paisán-Ruiz
  • Novel compound heterozygous LIAS mutations cause glycine encephalopathy

    Yoshinori Tsurusaki
    24 Jun 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Novel compound heterozygous LIAS mutations cause glycine encephalopathy Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, June 25 2015. doi:10.1038/jhg.2015.72 Authors: Yoshinori Tsurusaki, Ryuta Tanaka, Shino Shimada, Keiko Shimojima, Masaaki Shiina, Mitsuko Nakashima, Hirotomo Saitsu, Noriko Miyake, Kazuhiro Ogata, Toshiyuki Yamamoto & Naomichi Matsumoto
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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